Staycation Mini-Roadtrip: Kentucky Highway 89

Kentucky Scenic Byway Highway 89
Kentucky Scenic Byway Highway 89

Oftimes when we think of a road trip, we typically think of some far off location with fun sites and unique places to visit.  Indeed, we may often overlook what is right in our backyard.  Thus the word “Staycation” was born.  A staycation is typically defined as a period in which an individual or family stays home and participates in leisure activities within driving distance, sleeping in their own beds at night. Most of the time it involves dining out more frequently than usual. Staycations achieved popularity in the US during the financial crisis of 2007–2010.

Map of my May 9 trip on KY 89
Map of my May 9 trip on KY 89
Kentucky Highway 89 south out of Winchester
Kentucky Highway 89 south out of Winchester

I personally have taken a few of these in my own home town of Lexington and in surrounding areas around Kentucky.  Last Monday was one of those days that I wanted to get out on the road, so I took a mini-roadtrip to travel along part of Kentucky’s Scenic Byway Highway 89 from Winchester through Irvine and into McKee.   I had received inspiration to take this trip from a friend’s posting on Facebook about a small drive-in restaurant in Ravenna, KY called The Wigwam Drive-In. (I posted about that yesterday) Though only a four hour trip, it was well worth it both in beauty and in the refreshment of just getting out on the road and seeing the beautiful hills of the Bluegrass.

Kentucky Scenic Byway sign on KY 89
Kentucky Scenic Byway sign on KY 89
Typical Hardwood forest along KY 89
Typical Hardwood forest along KY 89

From Lexington I took US 60 to the lovely historic town of Winchester (which I’ll cover in another Staycation post in the future).  From there I took Kentucky Highway 89 south towards Irvine, which begins on East Washington St. in Winchester.   This drive weaves its way through farmland and hardwood forests passing through a few sparsely populated communities and their small churches.

Watch out! It's a Trapp!
Watch out! It’s a Trapp!

The first community along the way is Trapp.  Originally called Round Tree, the town had a school, post office and other stores. Trappers would visit the community’s stores, which is how the school was dubbed Trapp in the early 1900s.   Nowadays the town has a few homes and a small grocery store called Fox’s General Store,  which is advertised on the side of a building with a nice wall advertisement.

Advertisement for Fox's General Store in Trapp, KY
Advertisement for Fox’s General Store in Trapp, KY
Old Log Lick Road in Trapp, KY. Love the name!!
Old Log Lick Road in Trapp, KY. Love the name!!
The Red River Bridge on KY 89 south of Trapp, KY
The Red River Bridge on KY 89 south of Trapp, KY

From there 89 crosses a bridge over the Red River into Estill County and the small community of Palmer. It is there that the Welcome to Estill County sign can be seen.  I like its catchphrase “Where the Bluegrass Kisses the Mountains.”  And indeed, this is where the mountains of eastern Kentucky really get started.  From this point southward the drive is a natural wonderland of forest, wildflowers and rolling hills.

Welcome to Estill County, KY
Welcome to Estill County, KY
Hargett, KY
Hargett, KY

Soon I was driving into the community of Hargett which welcomes the driver with a rare sighting of an old Mail Pouch Barn, one of only six or seven I have seen in Kentucky.  Originally known as Woodwards Creek, a post office opened in 1879 and was renamed Sams for a local store owner in 1886. It later moved to the nearby Louisville and Nashville Railroad’s Harg Station and was renamed Harg in 1914, just before closing.  A Hargett post office opened in 1915 and closed in 1943.  It is now a small unincorporated community with an old auto repair place that has a number of really old cars.  There is also a fire department.

A rare Mail Pouch barn sighting in Hargett, KY
A rare Mail Pouch barn sighting in Hargett, KY
Old Cars in Hargett, KY
Old Cars in Hargett, KY
This one has some personality!!
This one has some personality!!
Price Less Foods in Irvine, KY
Price Less Foods in Irvine, KY

About five miles down the road I entered Irvine and was welcomed by a Priceless Foods store (actually I think it is Price Less, but I like the Priceless better–HA!!).  Irvine is the home to locally famous Mountain Mushroom Festival at the end of April.  Irvine and nearby Ravenna are known within Estill County as the “Twin Cities.”  It is also the home of the famed Backstreet Boys Kevin Richardson and actor Harry Dean Stanton, who has appeared in a number of films including Cool Hand Luke, Alien, Red Dawn, Pretty in Pink and the Green Mile, among a myriad of others.

Welcome to Irvine, KY
Welcome to Irvine, KY
Irvine Clock
Irvine Clock
A large wooden carving of a mountain mushroom in downtown Irvine, KY
A large wooden carving of a mountain mushroom in downtown Irvine, KY
Welcome to Irvine, KY
A large mural on the side of River Place Antiques in Irvine welcomes visitors from the north on KY 89
Another large mural can be seen as one crosses the Kentucky River on KY 89 coming from the south into Irvine. It features a red geode, something else that Irvine is famous for.
Another large mural can be seen as one crosses the Kentucky River on KY 89 coming from the south into Irvine. It features a red geode, something else that Irvine is famous for.
The old Mack Theatre. Not sure if this is in use anymore
The old Mack Theatre. Not sure if this is in use anymore
A large mural of a train welcomes visitors to Ravenna, KY
A large mural of a train welcomes visitors to Ravenna, KY

As noted above, the driving force for taking this mini-roadtrip to was to find my into Ravenna and visit the Wigwam Drive-In Restaurant.  Ravenna is a twin city to Irvine and is accessed via KY Highway 52, which in town used to be affectionately called “The Wam.”

A large VFW mural in Ravenna
A large VFW mural in Ravenna
Downtown Ravenna, KY
Downtown Ravenna, KY
Another Ravenna Mural
Another Ravenna Mural depicting the Employee Safety Bridge

DSC_3128Before it was incorporated, Ravenna was apparently known only as “The Village”.  The Louisville & Nashville Railroad was responsible for the name of Ravenna, the building of the shops, yard, office building, passenger and freight station, and many other things that were built for the establishment of a railroad terminal in Estill County just east of Irvine.  After the completion of the terminal in 1915, the county decided it would call it “Ravenna”, which stems from the word “ravine”. Some early railroad officials reported that an Italian foreman and interpreter, with a construction crew of approximately 60 Italian men building the railroad yards, requested that the railroad officials name the station in honor of his birthplace, Ravenna, Italy, and it was so granted by the railroad officials in charge of such matter.

Sumoflam at the Wigwam Drive-In in Ravenna, KY
Sumoflam at the Wigwam Drive-In in Ravenna, KY

Just around the corner is the 60 year old Wigwam Drive-In Restaurant, famous for its Country Boy Burger (see my post about this place HERE).  A unique little diner, this place is loved by many residents, many Kentuckians and others.  I loved the old style diner feel of the place!

A collection of old soda bottles sits in a window of a store front in Ravenna
A collection of old soda bottles sits in a window of a store front in Ravenna
An Old Pharmacy sign in downtown Ravenna. I love old signs like this.
An Old Pharmacy sign in downtown Ravenna. I love old signs like this.
Kentucky River bridge on KY 52/KY 89 in Irvine, KY
Kentucky River bridge on KY 52/KY 89 in Irvine, KY

After leaving Ravenna, I got back onto KY 89 and crossed over the Kentucky River on the old bridge, which was built around 1940.  Once across the bridge I continued my trek down KY 89 towards the mountain town of McKee, KY.

Heading into the mountains along KY 89 S out of Irvine.
Heading into the mountains along KY 89 S out of Irvine.
Owl Heads Grocery in South Irvine. Love the sign!
Owl Heads Grocery in South Irvine. Love the sign!
A quilt Block Barn and Gourd Houses for purple martins
A quilt Block Barn and Gourd Houses for purple martins

Along the entire drive there are barns with quilt blocks on the side.  These are commonly seen in Kentucky, Tennessee and Ohio, and perhaps other states.  Estill County has its own Quilt Trail.  There are a number of them in Kentucky, some of which I have visited in the past but not yet documented on my blog.

DSC_3143Purple Martins are North American birds that nest in colonies of 2 to 200 pairs.  They like communal living and return to their gourd abodes annually.  These communities can be seen all over the southeast and look nice as well as serving a purpose.  Learn more about the gourds and the birds HERE.

Forested road on KY 89. Much of the drive south of Irvine is like this
Forested road on KY 89. Much of the drive south of Irvine is like this
Wildflowers along the highway
Wildflowers along the highway

KY Highway 89 turns into a windy, sometimes switchbacked, highway through the Daniel Boone National Forest.  It is a beautiful drive this time of year as wildflowers dot the highway, as well as old beautiful barns.

Russell Flat Holiness Church
Russell Flat Holiness Church

There are many small community churches along this stretch of highway.  The buildings are typically non-descript, but I love seeing the signs.  Russell Flat was one of these.

There are quite a few others, many off of side roads.

Miniature horse spotting on Highway 89 by the side of the Russell Flat Church
Miniature horse spotting on Highway 89 by the side of the Russell Flat Church
An old barn on the side of the highway. There are dozens of these.
An old barn on the side of the highway. There are dozens of these.
A rustic old house along the road...looks like someone still lives there
A rustic old house along the road…looks like someone still lives there
KY 89 north of McKee, KY
KY 89 north of McKee, KY
Another church sign...just north of McKee
Another church sign…just north of McKee
Welcome to McKee, KY
Welcome to McKee, KY

I made my way into McKee, KY, another small town located in the heart of Jackson County, Kentucky.  It is home to bluegrass festivals and more.  I will visit there again and provide a more detailed report on this cute little place.

Old fire engine sign in Sand Gap, KY
Old fire engine sign in Sand Gap, KY

Highway 89 does continue south on to London, KY, but due to time constraints, I returned to Lexington via Richmond on US Highway 421, which is itself a beautiful drive through places like Sand Gap and Big Hill.  It was a great trip!!

Welcome to Sand Gap, KY
Welcome to Sand Gap, KY
An old Frosty-ette Drive in in Sand Gap, KY. I love these old places
An old Frosty-ette Drive in in Sand Gap, KY. I love these old places
Welcome to Big Hill, KY
Welcome to Big Hill, KY
The Big Hill north of Big Hill, KY on US Hwy 421. Goes down through limestone cliffs, often called Palisades
The Big Hill north of Big Hill, KY on US Hwy 421. Goes down through limestone cliffs, often called Palisades

And, one last road sign….sometimes they can be pretty silly….

DSC_3164

ENJOY THE RIDE!!  Take a staycation near your home, wherever it may be.  You never know what you may see.

 

 

 

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A to Z Challenge: The V Towns #atozchallenge

During the month of April I am participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge. The challenge has each blogger select a theme and then do a post thematically from A to Z during each day of April , except Sundays. My blog is number 1337 out of 1670 participating blogs. This year my A to Z posts will take you across the back roads of America to many unique towns. To see what other bloggers will be posting about, check out the link: A to Z Theme Reveal List for 2016

VThe V Towns

Vulcan, Alberta

Welcome to Vulcan Plaque
Welcome to Vulcan Plaque
Welcome to Vulcan in Klingon
Welcome to Vulcan in Klingon
At the Starship Enterprise in Vulcan, Alberta 2007
At the Starship Enterprise in Vulcan, Alberta 2007
Vulcan Public Library Sign
Vulcan Public Library Sign
Enterprise Family Restaurant - Vulcan, Alberta
Enterprise Family Restaurant – Vulcan, Alberta
Vulcan Visitor Center
Vulcan Visitor Center
Star Trek Wall Mural in Vulcan, Alberta
Star Trek Wall Mural in Vulcan, Alberta

Back in 2007 I had occasion to visit a friend of mine in Alberta, Canada.  One of the side trips we tool was to the town of Vulcan, which has taken full advantage of its name and the association with the TV show Star Trek.  Vulcan is a town located midway between the cities of Calgary and Lethbridge inthe prairies of Southern Alberta, Canada.  The population of the town was 1,940 in 2006, and the population of the county, which is also named Vulcan. See more about my Vulcan visit HERE. Live long and prosper!!

Valier, Montana

Welcome to Valier, Montana
Welcome to Valier, Montana
Rock City Rd. and Dean Rd., north of Valier, MT
Rock City Rd. and Dean Rd., north of Valier, MT
Sumoflam at Rock City north of Valier, Montana
Sumoflam at Rock City north of Valier, Montana
Rock City near Valier, Montana
Rock City near Valier, Montana
Two Medicine River north of Valier, Montana
Two Medicine River north of Valier, Montana

Last week I posted about a place near Sweet Grass, Montana called Jerusalem Rocks.  About 70 south of there is a town called Valier.  It is a small town of about 700 and really does not have a whole lot there. But, just outside of town is another outcropping of hoodoos and formations in a place called Rock City.  I wrote about this and other similar places in a post HERE.  But, you may also want to check out my complete post on my Montana US Highway 89 adventure HERE.

Vernal, Utah

Welcome to Vernal, UT
Welcome to Vernal, UT
Dinosaur National Monument, Vernal, UT
Dinosaur National Monument, Vernal, UT
DinoHead
Dinosaur Head Fossil at Dinosaur National Monument
DinNatMon1
Dinosaur bones embedded at Dinosaur National Monument
DaveDinLeg
Sumoflam with a dinosaur Leg Bone Fossil at Dinosaur National Monument
Flaming Gorge, near Vernal, UT (photo from utah.com)
Flaming Gorge, near Vernal, UT (photo from utah.com)

In 1975 I made weekly trips from Salt Lake City to Vernal, Utah for work as a record/tape distributor.  I loved the drive and Vernal was actually a nice place to visit every week.  In the early 2000s I once again visited with my family as we ventured to the Dinosaur National Monument.  Along with my trips, I would drive the switchbacks form Vernal and over the area known as Flaming Gorge.  This is beautiful country and well worth the visit.  It has been many years since I have been there, and I hope to get there again soon!

Vandalia, Illinois

Vandalia Water Tower with Lincoln on it
Vandalia Water Tower with Lincoln on it
Vandalia State House in Vandalia, IL
Vandalia State House in Vandalia, IL
Breathing Fire in Vandalia
Breathing Fire in Vandalia
Sumoflam and the Fire Breathing Dragon of Kaskaskia in Vandalia, IL
Sumoflam and the Fire Breathing Dragon of Kaskaskia in Vandalia, IL

On a family trip in 2014, we drove through the town of Vandalia, Illinois as part of our return trip home.  Our main reason for coming here was to see a fire breathing dragon…made from metal. But, Vandalia is so much more.  This is where Abraham Lincoln kicked off his career as a politician.  It was the western terminus of the National Road, one of America’s first highways.  The Kaskaskia Dragon was a load of fun for the grandkids too!! Check out my full trip report with lots of photos HERE.

Vicksburg, Mississippi

Sumoflam and Cannons at Vicksburg National Military Park
Sumoflam and Cannons at Vicksburg National Military Park
Entry arch at Vicksburg
Entry arch at Vicksburg
Cannon line the grounds of Vicksburg National Military park in Vicksburg, MS
Cannon line the grounds of Vicksburg National Military park in Vicksburg, MS
Sculpture at Vicksburg
Sculpture at Vicksburg
Sculpture at Vicksburg
Sculpture at Vicksburg

In the summer of 2014 I cruised down the Blues Highway and ended up spending the night in Vicksburg, Mississippi. I woke up early the next day to visit the Vicksburg National Military Park before heading further south on Highway 61. The park preserves the site of the American Civil War Battle of Vicksburg, waged from May 18 to July 4, 1863 and also commemorates the greater Vicksburg Campaign, which preceded the battle. The expansive park includes 1,340 historic monuments and markers, 20 miles of historic trenches and earthworks, a 16-mile tour road, 144 emplaced cannons, a restored gunboat, and more. A must see for Civil War enthusiasts, but also a great place to learn about a facet of American history.  Besides the park, the town has a great Coca Cola memorabilia museum and a number of murals along the river wall.  You can see many more photos and a more detailed writeup about my visit in 2014 HERE.

Versailles, Kentucky (Honorable Mention)

A mural on a water tower in Versailles, Kentucky
A mural on a water tower in Versailles, Kentucky
Scrap Metal Horse at Woodford Reserve near Versailles, Kentucky
Scrap Metal Horse at Woodford Reserve near Versailles, Kentucky
Horses graze in the fall on a Woodford County farm near Versailles.
Horses graze in the fall on a Woodford County farm near Versailles.
One of many amazing Horse Farm barns that can be seen in the Versailles area
One of many amazing Horse Farm barns that can be seen in the Versailles area
Versailles is in the heart of the Horse Capital of the World
Versailles is in the heart of the Horse Capital of the World

Living in Lexington, Kentucky offers many wonderful opportunities for “Staycations.”  One great place to visit nearby is the lovely and historic town of Versailles (pronounced Ver-sales) which is on US Highway 62 west of Lexington. Versailles is well-known for its quaint, small-town beauty, beautiful horse farms and Kentucky’s famed bourbon distilleries, including the famed Woodford Reserve.  Many of the famed Bluegrass Horse Farms are in Woodford County and near Versailles.   I have never written a blog post about Versailles, but I would highly recommend a visit there if you come to Kentucky.  Plan the trip in April and go to the races at nearby Keeneland Racetrack then take the Bourbon Trail.  Check out my 2013 blog post about Horse Farm Country with many photos about horses, horse farms and the Horse Capital of the World — right HERE.

Vincennes, Indiana (Honorable Mention)

Family at the George Rogers Clark National Historic Park in Vincennes, Indiana Summer 2001
Family at the George Rogers Clark National Historic Park in Vincennes, Indiana Summer 2001
Family inside the Clark Memorial with George Rogers Clark and the seven murals, Summer 2001
Family inside the Clark Memorial with George Rogers Clark and the seven murals, Summer 2001

In the summer of 2001 my family took a trip westward to Utah (including the trip to Vernal noted above).  Early in the trip we went through Vincennes, Indiana to visit the George Rogers Clark National Historical Park. Founded in 1732 by French fur traders, Vincennes is the oldest continually inhabited European settlement in Indiana and one of the oldest settlements west of the Appalachians. It sits at the intersection of US Highway 41 and US Highway 50. George Rogers Clark (November 19, 1752 – February 13, 1818) was a surveyor, soldier, and militia officer from Virginia and the highest ranking American military officer on the northwestern frontier during the American Revolutionary War. He served as leader of the Kentucky (then part of Virginia) militia throughout much of the war. Clark is best known for his celebrated captures of Kaskaskia (1778) (Way before the fiery dragon noted above!!) and Vincennes (1779) during the Illinois Campaign, which greatly weakened British influence in the Northwest Territory. Because the British ceded the entire Northwest Territory to the United States in the 1783 Treaty of Paris, Clark has often been hailed as the “Conqueror of the Old Northwest”.  his younger brother William was the “Clark” in the Lewis and Clark expeditions.  This trip was well before my travel blogging days, but the Memorial was definitely one of our more memorable experiences on a trip across the country to see history.

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Wall Art in Lexington 2014: PRHBTN & more

IMG_9871
Sumoflam with the newly designed PRHBTN truck

Lexington again has new art covering some of its formerly barren walls around town as the Street Art promoting organization PRHBTN brought in four new world renown street artists to enhance the growing collection of unique murals that dot the town.

prhbtnThe contributing artists this year included How and Nosm (twin brothers Raoul & Davide Perre  originally from Spain), ROA (from Ghent, Belgium), Andrew Hem (a Cambodian immigrant currently from Los Angeles) and MTO (a French born graffiti artist currently from Berlin). Each of these four artists have very unique styles and techniques as can be seen from their photos in this post.

The enormous "I Am MO" mural in the Lexington Distillery District
The enormous “I Am MO” mural in the Lexington Distillery District

Perhaps the most amazing (and controversial) is the behemoth 75 foot tall by 270 feet wide mural by MTO on the side of the Pepper Distillery Warehouse on Manchester. Titled “My Name is MO,” this piece of Street Art is stunning in its accuracy and complexity.  Though MTO is more well known for painting giant murals of famous celebrities, this particular character is not one. Rather, he created a complex story that explains the creation and it is artistically presented in a video that MTO produced.

http://vimeo.com/111310990

This particular massive mural has been accused of using gang symbolism. The neighboring garden center has complained that they don’t like being stared down at be this monster mural. But, ultimately was painted on private property and went through the appropriate approvals before a drop of paint made its way onto the brick and mortar canvas.

Detail of "I am MO"
Detail of “I am MO”
Detail of "I am MO"
Detail of “I am MO”
Sumoflam visits "I am MO"
Sumoflam visits “I am MO”

In a nutshell, this MTO mural epitomizes what PRHBTN is all about. PRHBTN is short for Prohibition, which is what many graffiti and street artists face. PRHBTN was started by John and Jessica Winters in 2011 to encourage the growth of street art in Lexington. They have invited well-known international artists to town to create new mural works on vacant downtown walls, getting support from private donors, local business and community organizations (including me through Kickstarter). They work with property owners to secure the brick and mortar “canvases.” Their goal to highlight this new genre of art is turning Lexington into a living street art gallery, as more than 25 large murals and a number of minor ones adorn many of the formerly bare walls of the community. Indeed, one of last year’s pieces, “Abraham Lincoln” by Brazilian street artist Eduardo Kobra, has drawn national attention and is a new drawing card for tourism downtown.

Sumoflam at Eduardo Kobra's Lincoln mural in downtown Lexington
Sumoflam at Eduardo Kobra’s Lincoln mural in downtown Lexington

Adding to the collection this year is the huge mural entitled “Moonshine” by Twin brothers How and Nosm. They are known for their black, white, red and pink color schemes as well as their whimsical work. This mural does not disappoint. Painted on the four story side of the LexPark parking structure in Short Street, it is sure to be missed by those driving down the street. But, for those walking to the garage from Mill St., it is difficult to miss. Try as I might, I have not been able to track down the story behind this giant masterpiece of whimsy.

"Moonshine" by HOW and NOSM, on the side of the Short Street LePark garage in downtown Lexington
“Moonshine” by HOW and NOSM, on the side of the Short Street LePark garage in downtown Lexington

Just down Short Street, about three blocks from “Moonshine,” is another new work on the side of a building, this one by Los Angeles artist Andrew Hem. Titled “The Night Watchers,” it is the latest creation by Hem, a 2006 graduate of Art Center College of Design (Pasadena, CA), and an internationally recognized muralist. Andrew has created public artworks most recently in the Arctic, as well as Los Angeles, Chicago, Seattle, New York and London and now Lexington.

"The Night Watchers" by Andrew Hem in downtown Lexington
“The Night Watchers” by Andrew Hem in downtown Lexington
Detail of Night Watchers by Andrew Hem
Detail of Night Watchers by Andrew Hem
Detail of Night Watchers by Andrew Hem
Detail of Night Watchers by Andrew Hem

The fourth artist, ROA, was commissioned to do his mural on the side of building just off of North Limestone in his trademark monochromatic style. His dying bison is about three stories tall and is well worth a ponderous peek.

ROA Giant Bison
Giant buffalo (bison) waiting to die, by Street Artist ROA
Sumoflam with ROA's Bison in Lexington
Sumoflam with ROA’s Bison in Lexington

And, while in Lexington, ROA added a second piece in the Lexington Distillery District on the side of an old water tank. This giant bee appears as if it had rolled over and died.

Bee on its back by ROA, located in the Lexington Distillery District
Bee on its back by ROA, located in the Lexington Distillery District

The annual PRHBTN commissions and party typically happen in October. Apparently, another well-known Chicago-based street artist with a defined style, named Left Handed Wave, just happened to sneak into town and left his mark on the front of the same building that 2013 PRHBTN artist Odeith had painted horses on the side of. His iconic style is a signature in and of itself.

Left Handed Wave work on the front door of the old Bazaar on Bryan location
Left Handed Wave work on the front door of the old Bazaar on Bryan location

But PRHBTN was not the only group commissioning work this year. LexPark, in conjunction with the Saul Good Restaurants and a couple of other companies, brought in Appalachian artist Lacy Hale, with her brother Seth, painted a wonderfully colorful Tulip Poplar mural at the stairwell entrance to the LexPark garage near the corner of Main St. and Broadway (118 North Broadway). The Tulip Poplar is the state tree of Kentucky.

"Tulip Poplar" by Lacy Hale, located at LexPark garage entrance near Broadway and Main
“Tulip Poplar” by Lacy Hale, located at LexPark garage entrance near Broadway and Main
Detail of "Tulip Poplar" by Lacy Hale
Detail of “Tulip Poplar” by Lacy Hale

While on my quest to discover more art work in town, I came across two 2013 pieces by Dronex, Inc., a collaborative of artists headed by Myke Dronez, of Lexington, perhaps the most well known street artist from Kentucky. They have two wonderfully whimsical pieces in town (and perhaps more). The first is of a train hauling bourbon barrels and can be found in the Lexington Distillery District by Buster’s. The other is on the side of a building on Lisle Industrial Ave and is called “Stockyard Commons.” Both have the Dronex drones dotting the work.

2013 Lexington Distillery District mural, by Dronex Inc.
2013 Lexington Distillery District mural, by Dronex Inc.
Dronex "Cowboy drone", detail of Lexington Distillery District Mural
Dronex “Cowboy drone”, detail of Lexington Distillery District Mural
Another Dronex drone on the Lexington Distillery District mural
Another Dronex drone on the Lexington Distillery District mural
Stockyard Commons mural by Dronex Inc., located on Lisle Industrial
Stockyard Commons mural by Dronex Inc., located on Lisle Industrial
Dronex drone riding a bull, detail of "Stockyard Commons" mural
Dronex drone riding a bull, detail of “Stockyard Commons” mural

Another fun discovery was just off North Broadway past Loudon Ave., on Washington St., which is home to the BroCoLoco Agency.  They have painted a flock of migratory origami titled “Origami Tsunami” on the side of a building., apparently completed in early July 2014.

Detail of "Origami Tsunami" by BroCoLoco in Lexington
Detail of “Origami Tsunami” by BroCoLoco in Lexington

UPDATED DEC. 1, 2014

Sumoflam at the mural of some strange characters on the side of Progress Market
Sumoflam at the mural of some strange characters on the side of Progress Market

I heard a rumor that there were a couple of murals I missed in my recent whirlwind tour of Lexington.  The one above is at 600 N. Limestone on the side of Progress Market.  No idea who painted it and can’t locate any info.  Here are a couple more pics.

Long View of mural at Progress Market
Long View of mural at Progress Market
Another view of Progress Market mural
Another view of Progress Market mural

Just down the street a couple of blocks is a small shop called Vintage Creations on Lime. The BroCoLoco Agency recently completed the wall art on the side (facing True Alley).  I really like this one!

Mural on Vintage Creations on Lime painted by BroCoLoco in 2014
Mural on Vintage Creations on Lime painted by BroCoLoco in 2014

In fact, on that coolish day in November I actually made a whirlwind trip around Lexington to do a selfie at as many of these as I could find and get to. I managed most of them. I have created a slideshow of my “Selfie Tour” and posted it HERE. You can also see my posts from last year PART I and PART II for more details.

Custom map of locations for all of the murals and street art works in Lexington is below:

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