Roadside America Celebrates 20 Years on the Web today

My friends at Roadside America (www.roadsideamerica.com) are celebrating 20 years on the World Wide Web today (September 1, 2016.)

Home page from 1996 kickoff of Roadside America website
Home page from 1996 kickoff of Roadside America website

I have actually been using their site since the beginning and over the years have submitted stories, updates and photographs from my travels to the 50 United States and parts of Canada.

Sumoflam and Big Fish in Bena, MN, one of the 1000s of sites covered
Sumoflam and Big Fish in Bena, MN, one of the 1000s of sites covered

There are many travel sites on the web, but this, in my opinion, tops them all!! If there is a quirky, offbeat, unique roadside attraction on the back roads of America, chances are you can read about it and see photos on its site.

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I am honored to know one of the founders and to work with these guys!

check out the whole story at http://www.roadsideamerica.com/story/54539

 

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Bike Trails: Ohio Erie Towpath Trail, Cuyahoga Valley National Park, OH

This is the second in a continuing series of Bike Trail posts.  Like the back roads of America, the recent interest in bike paths and rails-to-trails paths provides a new insight on “back roads”.  Each Bike Path post will include surrounding information, vehicle support info and trail ratings as provided by my wife Julianne.  One bike pump equals a “poor” rating while five pumps equals an “excellent” rating.  We’ll also provide links to the RTC TrailLinks overview of the trail. Complete Trails Overview Post is HERE
OhioErieCanalway
BlackPump3Ohio and Erie Canal Towpath Trail – Cuyahoga Valley N.P., OH

Click here for RTC TrailLink Details

Towpath Trail in Cuyahoga Valley NP, Ohio
Towpath Trail in Cuyahoga Valley NP, Ohio

The Ohio Erie Towpath Trail runs along the old Erie canal towpath and covers approximately 85 miles. It has trailheads in Cleveland and continues south through the Cuyahoga Valley Valley National Park and further south than that.

Towpath Trail as seen from the Boston Visitor's Center
Towpath Trail as seen from the Boston Visitor’s Center

There are portions of the trail that are paved and many other portions that are crushed limestone or hard packed, dirt making this accessible for most bikers.

Take the Train to a trailhead
Take the Train to a trailhead

This trail is also unique in that when you’re in the National Park, there is actually a train that can run you to a number of trailhead stops up the road with your bikes on the train and then you can ride back.  This allows one to park and have transportation to the trailhead. From April through October, you can bicycle one way and return by train for $3 using Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad’s Bike Aboard! service. Runners and hikers pay $9. You can catch the train at any boarding station. There are no guaranteed seats. Schedules are available at boarding stations, visitor centers, and online at www.CVSR.com.

Hanging around at the Boston Visitor's Center in Cuyahoga Valley National Park
Hanging around at the Boston Visitor’s Center in Cuyahoga Valley National Park

If you are following the riders along this trail as a support driver, there are plenty of places to stop and, of course, the National Park has some wonderful places including the visitor center in Boston. Across the street from the visitors center is a very nice snack shop that sells some local granola and treats and also some locally made drinks. They also have ice cream, which is a common amenity among many bike trails nowadays.

Julianne and Laura after their bike ride on the Towpath Trail
Julianne and Laura after their bike ride on the Towpath Trail

Julianne and her sister Laura rode about 15 miles of this trail during our visit to the National Park in May 2016. But they did enjoy the ride immensely and hope to make a trip back and take on more of the trail in the future.

Typical signage on the Miami Trail in Ohio
Typical signage on the Miami Trail in Ohio

Ohio is a state that has made great strides in creating nice bike trails and to promote bicycling as a major activity for families and others. In future  posts you will see info about the Greater Miami Bike Trail, the Little Miami Scenic Trail, theTri-County Triangle trail and more.

The Hunt House in Cuyahoga Valley National Park
The Stanford House in Cuyahoga Valley National Park
Trail Mix Shop
Trail Mix Shop

A visit to the Canal Exploration Center, the Boston Store Visitor Center, Peninsula Depot Visitor Center, or Staford House can make your outing on the Ohio & Erie Canal Towpath Trail even more enjoyable. At these stops you can talk to a park ranger, see exhibits, and get information.

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An Afternoon in Pittsburgh

Welcome to Pittsburgh
Welcome to Pittsburgh
Fort Pitt Tunnel in Pittsburgh
Fort Pitt Tunnel in Pittsburgh

As noted in my previous post about Prosperity/Canonsburg/Washington areas of Pennsylvania (see post HERE), we took an afternoon with my wife’s sister and her family to take a drive around Pittsburgh.  Obviously, an afternoon does no justice to a large beautiful city like this, but that was all the time we had. Fortunately, I have been to Pittsburgh before and have knocked out a few places worth visiting (see my post which includes some Pittsburgh sites HERE).

Bridges in Pittsburgh
Bridges in Pittsburgh
Crossing into Pittsburgh
Crossing into Pittsburgh

 

The PPG Glass Castle in downtown Pittsburgh
The PPG Glass Castle (One PPG Place) in downtown Pittsburgh

Our drive took us past the amazing glass structure built by PPG — their headquarters.  Some call it the “Glass Castle” and indeed, it looks like one.

Actually named PPG Place,  this amazing building is one of six structures designed by architects Philip Johnson and  John Burgee and completed in 1984.  The six buildings cover three city blocks and five and a half acres. All of the buildings are of matching glass design consisting of 19,750 pieces of glass. The complex centers on One PPG Place, a 40-story office building.

A view from below One PPG Place
A view from below One PPG Place
Artistic view of One PPG Place
Artistic view of One PPG Place
Roberto Clemente Bridge in Pittsburgh
Roberto Clemente Bridge in Pittsburgh

We also crossed over the famed Roberto Clemente Bridge, named for the 60’s era Pittsburgh Pirates outfielder. We passed by the Andy Warhol Museum (but didn’t stop to visit).

A study in 2006 noted that there were 446 bridges in Pittsburgh thus giving the town the nickname “The City of Bridges.” Of course, not all of them are the massive structures crossing the three major rivers.  There are nine or ten prominent bridges, including the Clemente, which is one of the “Three Siblings,” which are three parallel, nearly identical self-anchored suspension bridges that cross the Allegheny River at 6th, 7th, and 9th streets. They were named for prominent Pittsburgh residents: Roberto Clemente Bridge, Andy Warhol Bridge, and Rachel Carson Bridge.

Bridges across Pittsburgh
Bridges across Pittsburgh
Crossing the Smithfield Street Bridge in Pittsburgh
Crossing the Smithfield Street Bridge in Pittsburgh
Crossing the Andy Warhol Bridge in Pittsburgh
Crossing the Andy Warhol Bridge in Pittsburgh
The Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh
The Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh
Old Wall Sign in downtown Pittsburgh
Old Wall Sign in downtown Pittsburgh
Old Byham Theater in Pittsburgh - built in 1903
Old Byham Theater in Pittsburgh – built in 1903
Welcome to the Monongahela Incline
Welcome to the Monongahela Incline

After driving around a bit, we headed to the Monongahela Incline to take a ride up Mt. Washington, a hill that provides amazing panoramic views of Pittsburgh. This proved to be the highlight of this trip.

Monongahela Incline
Monongahela Incline

The Monongahela Incline is the oldest continuously operating funicular railway in the U.S. It opened on May 28, 1870, and has since then transported millions of passengers.  Built at a cost of $50,000, the incline opened up Mount Washington to development, enabling people to live 600 feet above the city and still have easy access to factories and businesses along the river.

Monongahela Incline
Monongahela Incline
Heading down on the Mongahela Incline
Heading down on the Mongahela Incline

At one time Pittsburgh had 15 inclines. Today the Monongahela and its younger sister the Duquesne (about a mile away) are the only ones that remain.  The cars are not self-powered, and do not even have operators on board. Instead, they are pulled up and down the inclined track by a cable driven by an engine in the upper station, where the operator works. The cars operate in pairs, permanently attached to opposite ends of a single cable, with one going uphill and the other going downhill simultaneously. The cars therefore counterbalance each other, so the engine needs to provide only enough power to overcome friction and the difference in the weight of the passengers in the two cars.

Monongahela Incline
Monongahela Incline
View of the city form the car on the Monongahela Incline
View of the city form the car on the Monongahela Incline
Riding down
Riding down

The ride up the hill is about 635 feet and climbs a little over 365 feet in altitude at a grade of about 35 degrees. At its max speed of 6 miles per hour, the ride takes about three or four minutes. There is no air conditioning in the buildings or on the actual trains.  So, on a hot day like we experienced, it was a warm wait.

 

Enjoying the Ride!
Enjoying the Ride!

Each car holds about 23 people, with room for about 8 persons in each section of the car.  It is certainly something I would want to sit down on rather than stand in.  The view from the window can be kind of scary.

 

Monongahela Incline going up
Monongahela Incline going up
Panoramic View of Pittsburgh from atop Mt. Washington
Panoramic View of Pittsburgh from atop Mt. Washington
Mount Washington
Mount Washington

Once atop Mt. Washington, the view is breathtaking with expansive views of the three rivers (the Allegheny, Monongahela and Ohio) and the many bridges over these rivers.

While at the top, we took in the view, walked over to DiFiore’s for an ice cream treat and a rest.  From there I caught sight of an amazing wall mural.  Titled “Bloom,” this giant mural was painted by Gerard Tonti in October 2007. This is one of a number of large Art Murals funded by the Sprout Public Art project of Pittsburgh.  According to the website Pittsburgh Murals and Public Art, there were 32 original Sprout murals, but there are many more throughout the 90 Pittsburgh neighborhoods.  Looks like my next trip may be a mural hunt!!! (Pittsburgh Murals has created a great spreadsheet for the mural/public art seeker HERE.)

Family shot from Mt. Washington
Family shot from Mt. Washington
Pittsburgh from Mt. Washington
Pittsburgh from Mt. Washington
Fort Bridge with stadium in background
Fort Pitt Bridge with stadium in background
Another Bridge
Smithfield Street Bridge as seen from the top of Mt. Washington
Ice Cream anyone?
Ice Cream anyone? DiFiore’s on Mt. Washington
Bloom by Gerard
“Bloom” by Gerard Tonti
Detail of old Pittsburgh on Tonti's "Bloom"
Detail of old Pittsburgh on Tonti’s “Bloom”
Point of View by
“Point of View” by James A. West

Also while driving along the top of Mt. Washington we came across a lovely statue sitting on the edge of the hill (at Greenbriar Avenue and Sweetbriar Street).  Titled “Point of View,” this 2006 bronze sculpture by James A. West depicts George Washington and the Seneca leader Guyasuta, with their weapons down, in a face-to-face meeting in October 1770, when the two men met while Washington was in the area examining land for future settlement along the Ohio River.

Overlooking Pittsburgh with wife Julianne
Overlooking Pittsburgh with wife Julianne

That pretty much ended the day trip to Pittsburgh for us.  It was fun, but certainly warrants another visit in the near future.

 

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