Eastern Wyoming to Yellowstone: Cowboy Country, Buffaloes and more

Buffalo Bill Reservoir
Buffalo Bill Reservoir

On June 2, 2013 I continued my trip westward from Lexington thru South Dakota and into Wyoming.  On this leg I started in Gillette, Wyoming and made my way to Rexburg with a trip through Yellowstone National Park.

Welcome to Gillette, WY
Welcome to Gillette, WY

Gillette, Wyoming is the first large town in Wyoming on the western end of I-90.  It was incorporated in 1892 and is now called the “Energy Capital of the Nation” due to the high grade coal reserves as well as nearly 13,000 oil wells.

Cowboy Mural
Downtown Cowboy Mural by Harvey Jackson

Downtown Gillette is not too large, but, along the main street there are a number of sculptures and a great wall mural.  The mural above was done by Gillette artist Harvey Jackson, who has murals throughout Wyoming including a giant mural on the side of L &H Industrial in Gillette called “Campbell County Industrial Mural“, which is twice as large as Mt. Rushmore.

Poco a Poco Se Va Lejos by Pokey Park
Poco a Poco Se Va Lejos by Pokey Park

Gillette has a Mayor’s Art Council which features an “Avenue of the Arts” annually.  They have a number of pieces made and display them on the Main Street through town and then auction them.  Here are a few that I took while driving through town.

Abraham Lincoln - by Gary Lee Price
Abraham Lincoln – by Gary Lee Price

This Abraham Lincoln bronze work by Gary Lee Price is a duplicate of a piece in Jackson, Wyoming, which I visited a couple of months ago.

Talvez Manana by Pokey Park
Talvez Manana by Pokey Park

Pokey Park is a sculptor from Georgia.  She has the two turtles on display.

Belle - Jeannine Young
Belle – Jeannine Young

“Belle” is a work by Jeannine Young of Salt Lake City.

Cowboy - artist unknown
Cowboy – artist unknown
Feeding the geese
Feeding the ducks

Gillette is also home to the “Rockpile Museum.” This Campbell County Museum focuses on general, regional, and local history with an emphasis on the culture and people of Campbell County.  It was opened in 1974 at the site of the historic natural rockpile, which has been a piece of Gillette history since the 1890s.

Rockpile Museum - Gillette, Wyoming
Rockpile Museum – Gillette, Wyoming
Gillette's Rockpile
Gillette’s famous Rockpile

From Gillette I headed west towards Buffalo, Wyoming on I-90.   It was a beautiful day heading into the mountains of Wyoming.  There were some nice views and I also saw some antelope.

Mountains near Buffalo, WY
The Bighorn Mountains near Buffalo, WY
Heading West on I-90 in Wyoming
Heading West on I-90 in Wyoming towards the Bighorn Mountains
Antelope grazing near Buffalo, Wyoming
Antelope grazing near Buffalo, Wyoming
Welcome to Buffalo, WY
Welcome to Buffalo, WY

Buffalo, Wyoming is a nice small town in the foothills of the Bighorn Mountains.

Horse Sculpture - Buffalo, Wyoming
Cool Water – Buffalo, Wyoming

The sculpture above is called “Cool Water” and was done by Buffalo artist D. Michael Thomas, who has been sculpting cowboy themed pieces for over 30 years.

Nate Champion's Last Run - D. Michael Thomas
Nate Champion’s Last Run – D. Michael Thomas
Buffalo by Lyndon Fayne Pomeroy
Buffalo by Lyndon Fayne Pomeroy

Havre, Montana artist Lyndon Pomeroy did the unique bronze buffalo above.  I noted some of his work in Havre on a previous post.

Mountain Wildflowers - east of Buffalo on US 16
Mountain Wildflowers in a Mountain Meadow – east of Buffalo on US 16

The road from Buffalo, WY to Cody, WY has mountain majesties, wondrous wildflowers and amazing canyons.  Following is some of what I was able to see along US Route 16.

Mountain Scene on US 16 east of Buffalo, WY
Mountain Scene on US 16 east of Buffalo, WY

There are lots of wildflowers in bloom.  The yellow ones closeup look like this

Yellow Wildflowers in Bighorn National Forest
Arrow Leafed Balsamroot in Bighorn National Forest
Lupine in Big Horn National Forest
Lupine in Big Horn National Forest
Meadowlark Lake in Bighorn National Forest on US 16
Meadowlark Lake in Bighorn National Forest on US 16
Tensleep Canyon on US 16
Ten Sleep Canyon on US 16
US Route 16 into Worland, WY from Ten Sleep, WY
US Route 16 into Worland, WY from Ten Sleep, WY

Worland, Wyoming is also home to the Washakie Museum which features exhibits that portrays the history of the Big Horn Basin.  It is also home to a giant Mammoth Bronze statue.  The statue is 25 feet tall and weighs 6000 pounds.  It is the work of Casper, Wyoming (and Sedona, AZ) artist Chris Navarro.

Mammoth Bronze Statue by Chris Navarro in Worland, WY
Mammoth Bronze Statue by Chris Navarro in Worland, WY

From Worland I headed north on US 20 towards Greybull and then west on US 14/16/20 towards Cody.  This provided some great scenes of the mountains of Yellowstone.

Heading west on US 14/16/20 out of Worland
Heading west on US 14/16/20 out of Worland
Another view of the Rocky Mountains near Yellowstone
Another view of the Rocky Mountains near Yellowstone

I eventually arrived in Cody, Wyoming by late morning.  Named after William “Buffalo Bill” Cody who was one of the founders of the town. There is plenty in town of you are a Buffalo Bill (and I don’t mean football) fan!

Welcome to Cody, Wyoming
Welcome to Cody, Wyoming
Painted Grizzly on a corner in Cody
Painted Grizzly on a corner in Cody

The grizzly above is part of a Cody fundraising program called “The Grizzly Gathering“, which was created to raise funds for their library.  Many towns are doing similar things.  We had the horses in Lexington (“Horse Mania“) and I have seen buffaloes (“Buffalo Roam” project in West Yellowstone, WY), birds, etc., as I go through some towns.

Large mural in Cody, Wyoming
Large mural by Austin Kuck in Cody, Wyoming

The mural above is on the wall of Seidel’s Saddlery in Cody.  It was painted by Colorado Austin Kuck.

Cody Theatre - Cody, Wyoming
Cody Theatre – Cody, Wyoming

Of course, like many older towns in the west, there is still plenty of neon….

Irma Restaurant, Cody, WY
Irma Restaurant, Cody, WY
Irma Hotel, Cody, WY
Irma Hotel, Cody, WY

Then, of course, there are the many Buffalo Bill items in town…

Buffalo Bill Historical Center, Cody, WY
Buffalo Bill Historical Center, Cody, WY
The Scout by Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney
The Scout by Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney
Alternate view of the The Scout - Buffalo Bill statue
Alternate view of the The Scout – Buffalo Bill statue

The Scout is a bronze statue of a mounted rider outside the Buffalo Bill Historical Center in Cody. It was placed in 1924 to commemorate the town’s most famous resident, Buffalo Bill Cody. Originally in open land on the western outskirts of town, the statue today stands at the end of Sheridan Avenue. The project was initiated by Cody’s niece, Mary Jester Allen, who had established the basis of what would become the Buffalo Bill Historical Center. A New Yorker, she persuaded heiress and artist Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney to sculpt the piece.

"Hard and Fast All the Way" - Buffalo Bill sculpture by Peter M. Fillerup
“Hard and Fast All the Way” – Buffalo Bill sculpture by Peter Fillerup

The above bronze was done by Peter Fillerup of Heber, Utah.  It represents a younger Buffalo Bill as a Pony Express Rider.

Old Indian Woman -m Cody, Wyoming
Indian Woman, Cody, Wyoming
Indian Chief, Cody, Wyoming
Indian Chief, Cody, Wyoming

From Cody I was next on my way to Yellowstone, continuing along the same highway.  As I got closer there were more spectacular views of the Rocky Mountains and other unique things as well.

Buffalo Bill Reservoir
Buffalo Bill Reservoir
Highway to Wapiti, WY
Highway to Wapiti, WY
Cliffs near Wapiti, WY as seen from US 14/16/20
Cliffs near Wapiti, WY as seen from US 14/16/20

Then there is the famously unique Smith Mansion high up on a hill in Wapiti. This 40 year old structure was the brainchild of Wyoming artist Lee Smith. Smith spent his life, and eventually tragically ended it building this unique house for his family.  He fell to his death at the age of 48 in 1992.  The home is 5 stories tall, has numerous staircases and rooms and hidden entrances.  There is a great deal written about this odd place.  Unfortunately, I didn’t have time to venture up there, but I did get a good shot from below.

Smith Mansion - Wapiti, WY
Smith Mansion (The Crazy House) – Wapiti, WY
A Black Billed Magpie on a fencepost in Wapiti
A Black Billed Magpie on a fencepost in Wapiti
View towards mountains in Wapiti
View towards mountains in Wapiti
Giant stack of Antlers and Skulls in Wapiti
Giant stack of Antlers and Skulls in Wapiti
Closeup with skulls
Closeup with skulls

From Wapiti the road winds slowly into the East Gate of Yellowstone National Park.

Unique Formations west of Wapiti
Unique Formations west of Wapiti
Sandstone Cliffs and Mountains west of Wapiti
Sandstone Cliffs and Mountains west of Wapiti
The Approach to Yellowtone
The Approach to Yellowstone

The last time I visited Yellowstone National Park was in 1973 while my family lived in Bozeman, Montana.  So, it has been about 40 years since then.  Much has changed, but much has remained the same (or at least appears to have – we all know that geology is also ever changing).

Sumoflam at Yellowstone - First time in 40 years
Sumoflam at Yellowstone – First time in 40 years

In the lower 48 states there are many magnificent National Parks including my personal Big Five of Yellowstone (WY), the Grand Canyon (AZ), Glacier National Park (MT), Zions National Park (UT) and Grand Teton National Park (WY).  There are many others ( I probably would have included Yosemite, but I have not been there yet).  Indeed, I may be known for my visiting offbeat and quirky sites, but don’t let that fool you.  I am enamored by the amazing geographic and historical diversity of this country.  But, I  have only made it to 22 of the nation’s 59 national parks thus far.  I dream of getting to Denali in Alaska and the North Cascades in Washington, along with Yosemite. (Here is a complete list of the National Parks)

Snowy Mountains in Yellowstone
Snowy Mountains in Yellowstone

Unfortunately, I did not have a lot of time on this trip, so I tried to hit the highlights I could on the Grand Loop Road through the park to West Yellowstone.  Here are a few scenes from the drive, some without any captions.

SCENES OF YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK

Yellowstone National Park
Yellowstone National Park
Yellowstone National Park
Yellowstone National Park
Yellowstone National Park
Yellowstone National Park
Sylvan Lake - Yellowstone National Park
Sylvan Lake – Yellowstone National Park
Yellowstone National Park
Yellowstone National Park
Sylvan Pass - Yellowstone National Park
Sylvan Pass – Yellowstone National Park
Burned trees - Yellowstone National Park
Burned trees – Yellowstone National Park
A survivor - Yellowstone National Park
A survivor – Yellowstone National Park
Yellowstone National Park
Yellowstone National Park
Steam from Hot Springs - Yellowstone National Park
Steam from Hot Springs – Yellowstone National Park
Upper Falls of Yellowstone River from Artist's Point
Upper Falls of Yellowstone River from Artist’s Point
Sumoflam at Yellowstone Upper Falls
Sumoflam at Yellowstone Upper Falls

Buffalo and Elk in Yellowstone Park

Buffalo in Yellowstone Park
Buffalo in Yellowstone Park

Of course, everyone knows that wild buffalo roam Yellowstone National Park, as elk as do deer, elk, moose, antelope, mountain goats, bears and more.  Unfortunately, all I saw were the buffalo (and almost hit one too!!).  I saw a couple of elk as well.  I heard from a few other tourists that they saw some bears hanging around the rivers, but I didn’t see any.

Buffalo in Yellowstone Park
Buffalo in Yellowstone Park
A solitary elk bull relaxes in the meadow at Yellowstone
A solitary elk bull relaxes in the meadow at Yellowstone
Buffalo in Yellowstone Park
Buffalo in Yellowstone Park
Buffalo in Yellowstone Park
Buffalo in Yellowstone Park
Another bull elk meanders into a field
Another bull elk meanders into a field
Buffalo in Yellowstone Park
Buffalo in Yellowstone Park

As I noted above, I almost ran into a HUGE buffalo while driving through the park.  I rounded a corner and there he was crossing into the road almost in front of me.  This guy was taller than my car and could care less about me rounding the corner. He just kept meandering across the road casually.

Buffalo in Yellowstone Park
Buffalo in Yellowstone Park
Huge buffalo right next to my car
Huge buffalo right next to my car

Alas, I eventually made my way to the road out towards West Yellowstone and into Montana.

Heading west out of Yellowstone National Park
Heading west out of Yellowstone National Park
Welcome to Montana
Welcome to Montana

West Yellowstone still has some of the old motels from ages past.  Here are a few of the Ho-Hum Du

Ho-Hum Motel - West Yellowstone
Ho-Hum Motel – West Yellowstone
Dude Motel - West Yellowstone
Dude Motel – West Yellowstone
Westward Motel - West Yellowstone
Westward Motel – West Yellowstone
Leaving Yellowstone for Idaho
Leaving Yellowstone for Idaho

I finally made it into Rexburg late that evening…what a fantastic day this was!!

(2079)

South Dakota Backroads: Prairie Dogs and Badlands

Badlands National Park
Badlands National Park

On my previous post I covered my travels from Omaha to Kadoka, South Dakota along the Oyate Trail. This post covers the second part of that day, basically, my visit to the hauntingly wondrous Badlands National Park in western South Dakota.

Scrappy the Scrap Metal Buck by Brett Prang
Scrappy the Scrap Metal Buck by Brett Prang

Before I get into the Badlands visit, one more final comment about Kadoka.  While at a gas station off if I-90 I came across this giant scrap metal buck.  I did some research and found out that it’s name is “Scrappy” and it is the creation of metal artist Brett Prang, who resides in the Badlands area and runs Incredible Metal from his Guest House and their Frying Pan Ranch. I wish I would have known about his scrap metal art while I was in the area…..  He also has an amazing 37 foot tall metal cross that I would love to have seen.  (See article about Prangs here)

Closeup of Scrappy
Closeup of Scrappy

Scrappy was originally created as the mascot of Tivy High School (The Antlers) in Kerrville, Texas.  It was auctioned in 2005 to raise funds for the school.  It has now returned to its South Dakota birthplace.

Another closeup of Scrappy
Another closeup of Scrappy

Now, off to the Badlands!!

Welcome to the Badlands
Welcome to the Badlands

From Kadoka on I-90, I took Exit 131 and headed south on South Dakota Hwy 240 which passes by a big trading post and the Minuteman Missile National Historic Site which I did not visit.  Another couple of miles south on 240 is “The Ranch Store” which is a tourist stop for Badlands and Prairie Dog mementos, but is also home to the Giant Prairie Dog statue and about a gazillion little prairie dogs.  If you make a visit to the Badlands, this is a must stop, especially if you have children and a camera.

Giant Prairie Dog - Cactus Flats, SD
Giant Prairie Dog – Cactus Flats, SD
Sumoflam with the Giant Prairie Dog - Cactus Flats
Sumoflam with the Giant Prairie Dog – Cactus Flats
Here's Looking at You - Giant Prairie Dog
Here’s Looking at You – Giant Prairie Dog

According to the Ranch Store’s website, they got their start in Kadoka in the 1950s, but once I-90 was completed their location was no longer viable.  So, they moved their store and their 6 ton pink prairie dog statue to its current location in 1971.  Not only can you get your souvenirs and ice cream, but you can also feed the prairie dogs that reside in their own huge underground village on the side of the store.  I got some nice shots of some of these cuddly looking little guys….

Prairie Dog - Cactus Flats, SD
Prairie Dog – Cactus Flats, SD

These little Prairie Dogs have great personality!!

Prairie Dog -- standing watch in Cactus Flats
Prairie Dog — standing watch in Cactus Flats

I saw this mother prairie dog cuddling her two babies.  It was absolutely darling and almost human. Had to put three of the photos together to give a better feeling of her care.

Mama Doggie - Cactus Flats, SD
Mama Doggie (kissing, comforting and hugging)  – Cactus Flats, SD

And just one more fond farewell….

Fond Farewell - Cactus Flats, SD
Fond Farewell – Cactus Flats, SD

Rather than drive the full loop from Cactus Flats, I decided to head back up to I-90 and then take the exit for Wall Drug to head south to Badlands National Park at the Pinnacles Entrance.  It had been a long day’s drive from Omaha and across southern South Dakota, so the sun was beginning to set in the west and shadows were beginning to fall on the Badlands, which, in my opinion, was a great time to view the park.  Following are a few of the nearly 300 photos I shot in the Badlands.

The Badlands as seen from Sage Creek Rim Road
The Badlands as seen from Sage Creek Rim Road
The Badlands
The Badlands
The Badlands
The Badlands
Badlands and Grasslands in Badlands N.P.
Badlands and Grasslands in Badlands N.P.
A lonely buffalo grazes in the valley near Sage Creek
A lonely buffalo grazes in the valley near Sage Creek
More Badlands as seen from the Pinnacles Drive
More Badlands as seen from the Pinnacles Drive
Rolling prairie grasslands as you look north from The Badlands
Rolling prairie grasslands as you look north from The Badlands
A Mountain Bluebird perched on a fencepost in the Badlands
A Mountain Bluebird perched on a fencepost in the Badlands
Shadows in the Badlands
Shadows in the Badlands
Sage Creek Valley in the Badlands
Sage Creek Valley in the Badlands
Mountain Goats relax at sunset in the Badlands
Mountain Goats relax at sunset in the Badlands
Sunset at the Badlands
Sunset at the Badlands
Turkey Vultures take a rest
Turkey Vultures take a rest

Of course, the park has herds of mountain goats.  As I drive down into a valley a couple of them appeared on the side of the road grazing.  Unfettered by my stopping and shooting, they continued.  Here are a couple of shots of them.

Mountain Goat in the Badlands
Mountain Goat in the Badlands
Mountain Goat in the Badlands
Mountain Goat in the Badlands
Mountain Goat in the Badlands
Mountain Goat in the Badlands

The Badlands offered many amazing views.  I will devote a photo gallery to this trip later on.  But, I don’t think there could be a better time to visit than at sunset…

Badlands at Sunset
Badlands at Sunset

As the sun began its descent, I headed back to I-90 and then west towards my eventual overnight stay in Gillette, Wyoming.  My next day would take me west though Cody and into Yellowstone National Park.  That will be another a post in a few days.

A lonely cabin in the prairie
A lonely cabin in the prairie
Heading West towards Wyoming on I-90
Heading West towards Wyoming on I-90
Heading into the Sunset as I crossed into Wyoming on I-90
Heading into the Sunset as I crossed into Wyoming on I-90

(2658)

Road Trip Home from Idaho – Day 5: Des Moines, IA to Springfield, IL – Dutch, American Pickers and Cozy Dogs

Antique Archaeology
Antique Archaeology

April 3, 2013: Yet another day on the road home as Julianne and I take our time to see a few of the sites on the way.  This day we drove from Des Moines to a couple places in Iowa and eventually into Illinois. Here is our route:


View Larger Map – Des Moines, IA to Springfield, MO

First thing we did was head to Pella, Iowa, which is not too far from Des Moines.  Pella prides itself as being a “Touch of Holland” and indeed is very Dutch.  Home of the largest working Dutch windmill in the United States.  Pella was originally settled in 1847 by about 800 Dutch immigrants.  They named the town Pella, which in Dutch means City of Refuge, due to the fact that these immigrants were fleeing religious persecution in their home country of the Netherlands.  Pella is also the birthplace of Wyatt Earp, the famed sheriff of the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral.

Downtown Pella
Downtown Pella
Welcome to Pella
Welcome to Pella

We had been advised by friends to definitely try the “Dutch Letters” while here.  Dutch Letters are a flaky almond paste filled pastry.  Shaped like an S, they were apparently a traditional Christmas pastry in Holland.  We stopped at the Jaarsma Bakery on Franklin Street in Pella to have some of these.  They would be our breakfast.  Turns out they have a lot of other goodies!!

Jaarsma Bakery - Pella, Iowa
Jaarsma Bakery – Pella, Iowa
Yummy Goodies at Jaarsma Bakery
Yummy Goodies at Jaarsma Bakery
Almond Pies at Jaarsma Bakery
Almond Pies at Jaarsma Bakery
Famous "Dutch Letters" from Jaarsma Bakery
Famous “Dutch Letters” from Jaarsma Bakery

Another treat we were advised to try was Pella Ring Bologna. There are two well known places to get this ring bologna in Pella and we stopped at Ulrich’s Meat Market which is a couple doors down from the Jaarsma Bakery.  Not onl is the ring bologna good — the meat sticks were fabulous!!

Try smoking Pella Bologna
Try smoking Pella Bologna
Pella Ring Bologna
Pella Ring Bologna

The town of Pella is quaint and picturesque.  It was a pleasure to walk around and see some of the scenery, including a few smaller windmills and the larger one.  Here are a few scenes from Pella.

Daffodils in Bloom - Pella, IA
Daffodils in Bloom – Pella, IA

Pella is famed for its tulips, but we were too early for them.  But, daffodils are another Dutch bulb plant.  And they were in full bloom.

Buildings fronts in Pella, IA
Colorful building fronts in Pella, IA
Unique building corner in Pella, IA
Unique building corner turret in Pella, IA
Small Clock Tower in Pella
Small Clock Tower in Pella
Old Brick Wall Advertisement in Pella
Old Brick Wall Advertisement in Pella
Dutch-style Tiled Walls in Pella
Dutch-style Tiled Walls in Pella
Dutch Wooden Shoes - Pella, IA
Dutch Wooden Shoes – Pella, IA

Of course, perhaps the most famous thing in Pella (besides the famed Pella window factory) is the huge authentic working Dutch Windmill.  The Vermeer Mill, as it is called, is an 1850s style working windmill.  It is 124 feet tall and is the largest working windmill of its kind in the United States.  The mill is totally wind powered and is actually used like the windmills of old to grind wheat into flour.  It was built in Holland and assembled in Pella in 2002.

Sumoflam and the Vermeer Windmill
Sumoflam and the Vermeer Windmill
Vermeer Windmill - Pella, Iowa
Vermeer Windmill – Pella, Iowa
Vermeer Windmill towers above Pella to catch the wind
Vermeer Windmill towers above Pella to catch the wind

There is a Dutch Interpretive Center and small Dutch Village attached to the Windmill.  Within its confines are a number of Dutch style buildings , including Wyatt Earp’s birthplace.  We didn’t go into the village since admission was $10 per person, which we though was rather pricy.

After a pleasant time in Pella, we were back on the road.  With my penchant for going to strange named towns, I wanted to make our way down some back roads to What Cheer, Iowa. Originally named Petersburg in 1865 but was renamed What Cheer in 1879 after the Postal Service declined the name of Petersburg.  The Wikipedia article linked here has some details as to the origin of the name What Cheer.

Welcome to What Cheer, Iowa
Welcome to What Cheer, Iowa

Ironically, as we drive through town, I exclaimed to my wife that the town name should be “What Cheer?” as the small town looks like it is falling apart and many of the businesses have been abandoned. There were a little over 600 people in this small town according to the 2010 census.

Back road to What Cheer, IA.... a six mile long dirt road
Back road to What Cheer, IA…. a six mile long dirt road.  My GPS took us this route!!
Downtown What Cheer - many abandoned buildings
Downtown What Cheer – many abandoned buildings

Reminiscent of downtown Pella, there is one nicely kept building in What Cheer, with the nice corner turret.  It used to be a bank, but is apparently now a residence.

Corner Tower on building in What Cheer, IA
Corner Turret on building in What Cheer, IA
What Cheer
What Cheer
What Cheer Post Office - even this sign is becoming illegible and run down
What Cheer Post Office – even this sign is becoming illegible and run down
What Cheer, Iowa
What Cheer, Iowa

There was one other refreshing site in town.  One home had some unique artwork surrounding the yard.

Bunnie's House in What Cheer, IA
Bonnie’s House in What Cheer, IA
Wheel Fence at Bonnie's house in What Cheer
Wheel Fence at Bonnie’s house in What Cheer
A "Flower Bed" in What Cheer, Iowa
A “Flower Bed” in What Cheer, Iowa

From What Cheer we made our way northeast to I-80 and then into Le Clair, Iowa, a small touristy town along the Mississippi River.  This was my second visit to Le Claire as I had been here before to visit Antique Archaeology,  home of the “American Pickers” TV show on History Channel.  On my previous visit back in June 2012 I even got to meet Danielle and get a shot with her.

Sumoflam with Danielle Colby Cushman - June 20, 2012
Sumoflam with American Pickers star Danielle Colby – June 2012

When I visited in June last year Danielle had a shop in Le Claire across the street from Antique Archaeology called 4 Miles 2 Memphis.  She is actually well known for “up-cycling” things and making them into clothing, jewelry, etc.  The shop has since moved to Chicago.

Antique Archaeology, home of American Pickers
Antique Archaeology, home of American Pickers
Antique Archaeology's famous old car
Antique Archaeology’s famous old car
Antique Archaeology
Antique Archaeology
Sumoflam at Antique Archaeology
Sumoflam at Antique Archaeology

There are lots of unique things for sale at the shop, many which had been picked from shows past.  Here is a small sample of some of the things in the shop.  Recognize anything?

Old boots and stuff - Antique Archaeology
Old boots and stuff – Antique Archaeology
Motorcycle Goggles and Hat - Antique Archaeology
Motorcycle Goggles and Hat – Antique Archaeology
Mike's favorite subject - Indian Motorcycles - Antique Archaeology
Mike’s favorite subject – Indian Motorcycles – Antique Archaeology
Yucky Mask - Antique Archaeology
Yucky Mask – Antique Archaeology
Old Motorcycle - Antique Archaeology
Old Motorcycle – Antique Archaeology
Laurel and Hardy and Sumoflam
Laurel and Hardy and Sumoflam

A video clip of the American Pickers episode with the Laurel and Hardy masks.

You would be mistaken if you think that Antique Archaeology is the center piece of Le Claire.  This unique little town is chock full of personality, antique shops and more.

Old neon for Pelo's Sundries
Old neon for Pelo’s Sundries
Old back porch behind Pelo's in Le Claire
Old back porch behind Pelo’s in Le Claire

 

Pelo’s is your typical old sundry and fountain type shop, except that it now has a coffee shop, open mike nites and more.

River Boats in Le Claire, IA
River Boats in Le Claire, IA
Wooden Flag in Le Claire, IA
Wooden Flag in Le Claire, IA
More Antiques - Mike and Frank are not the only pickers in town
More Antiques – Mike and Frank are not the only pickers in town
The Auction Center
The Auction Center
Old Milk Cans - Le Claire, IA
Old Milk Cans – Le Claire, IA
Lots of stuff - Le Claire, IA
Lots of stuff – Le Claire, IA
More stuff - Le Claire, IA
More stuff – Le Claire, IA
Whimsy in Le Claire
Whimsy in Le Claire

Julianne was thrilled to visit some of the shops, but her biggest thrill was being able to “pick” a 1930s quilt from a shop in Le Claire.  This hand pieced and hand sewn quilt was in a small shop along the river.  The gal in the shop obviously didn’t know quilts like Julianne does as she had this quilt for sale for $150!!  It was a splurge purchase for us, but, we believe that the value of this quilt is really closer to $800 or $1000 due to its age and almost pristine quality, along with all of the 1930s fabric.

Julianne all smiles after getting a steal of a deal on a quilt. She is a Real Picker!!
Julianne all smiles after getting a steal of a deal on a quilt. She is a Real Picker!!
Le Claire was fun
Le Claire was fun

We could have spent more time in Le Claire, but had to move on.  My ultimate goal stop for the day was to get to Cozy Dog in Springfield, Illinois.

Illinois Route 66
Illinois Route 66

Springfield is one of those iconic Route 66 towns and along this road is the Cozy Dog Drive In, which claims to be the home of the all-American famed Corn Dog!  Though there is some dispute as to the true origin of the corn dog, the Cozy Dog story is that Ed Walmire and his friend Don Strand invented the deep fried battered hot dog on a stick while stationed in Amarillo, Texas during World War II. They called them crusty curs, but, upon Ed’s return to Springfield, Ed and his wife decided on the name “Cozy Dog” and began selling them from their house and at the Illinois State Fair in 1946.  Ed’s wife designed the “hot dogs in a loving embrace logo” for the drive in. In 1996 they moved their Drive In a bit up the road to its current location and gave it a decidedly Route 66 theme.

Cozy Drive In - Home of the famous Hot Dog on a Stick
Cozy Drive In – Home of the famous Hot Dog on a Stick
Route 66 Memorabilia in Cozy Drive In
Route 66 Memorabilia in Cozy Drive In
Cozy Drive In - Springfield, Illinois
Cozy Drive In – Springfield, Illinois
Typical Table Top at Cozy Drive In - Springfield, Illinois
Typical Table Top at Cozy Drive In – Springfield, Illinois
Cozy Drive In is an official Route 66 attraction
Cozy Drive In is an official Route 66 attraction

And of course, this is why we come to Cozy Dog – not healthy at all, but sure Yummiferous!!

Cozy Dogs and Homemade Fries - Cozy Dog - Springfield, IL
Cozy Dogs and Homemade Fries – Cozy Dog – Springfield, IL
We got our kicks with a Cozy Dog!!
We got our kicks with a Cozy Dog!!
Sumoflam and Cozy Dog
Sumoflam and Cozy Dog

This was officially our final stop on the way home so it was a perfect place to “cozy up” with my sweetheart….

Cozying up at Cozy Dog
Cozying up at Cozy Dog

After spending the night in Springfield, Julianne and I booked it back to our old Kentucky Home in Lexington.  It was a long trip, almost 2,800 miles (including side trips into towns, etc.) and over 55 hours of driving time.  We traveled from Rexburg, ID to Shelby, MT (to see the grandkids) and then across northern Montana, south into North and South Dakota, east thru Iowa, Illinois, Indiana and finally home.  This was Julianne’s longest road trip ever (her previous one was when we moved from Mesa, AZ to Frankfort, KY in 1991 — that was about 2100 miles).

Map of our entire road trip - April 2013
Map of our entire road trip – April 2013 – over 2800 miles

Now that is how you ENJOY THE RIDE!!

Some roadside assistance provided by friends at……


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