A Grab Bag from America’s Back Roads – The H Things #AtoZChallenge

In 2018 I  will feature a random (yet alphabetical) selection of photos I have taken from my nearly 20 years of back roads travel in the United States and Canada.  I may even throw in a few random shots from other trips to Japan, Mexico and the Philippines. My theme is called America’s Back Roads: A Grab Bag of Places in Pictures.

 

Home on the Range, North Dakota

Home on the Range sign in North Dakota

Hammering Man – Seattle, Washington

The Hammering Man by Jonathan Borofsky

Ho-Hum Motel – West Yellowstone, Montana

Ho-Hum Motel in West Yellowstone, Montana

Hillybilly Hot Dogs – Lesage, West Virginia

Yes, they do have a Website!!
Order Rite Cheer at Hillbilly Hot Dogs in Lesage, WV

Happy, Kentucky

Happy in Happy, KY

Hell, Michigan

Direction to Hell from Pickney, MI
Welcome to Hell

The Great Hodag – Rhinelander, Wisconsin

With the famed Hodag in Rhinelander, WI

Himeji Castle – Himeji, Japan

Visiting the famed Himeji Castle in 1987

Harlan Sanders Cafe – Corbin, Kentucky

Sanders Cafe in Corbin, KY. Birthplace of the KFC Special Recipe
The Colonel and Me at Sanders Cafe

Hipp Nursery – Haubstadt, Indiana

Martini bearing pink and white elephant pair at Hipp Nursery in Haubstadt, IN

Harry Truman Mural – Independence, Missouri

A mural of Harry Truman on a Law Office in Independence, MO painted by David McClain. Truman was born in Independence

Horsetail Falls – Multnomah County, Oregon

Horsetail Falls in Oregon

Hung Dong Supermarket – Houston, Texas

Of course, you can always come across unique shop names, like this one in Houston. I hear they have great sausages!!

Apple Valley Hillbilly Garden and Toyland – Calvert City, Kentucky

Hillbilly Garden Car – Calvert City, KY
Signs at Hillbilly Garden

Henry’s Rabbit Ranch – Staunton, Illinois

Henry’s Rabbit Ranch – Staunton, Illinois
Rich Henry and Sumoflam with their rabbit at Henry’s Ra66it Ranch in Staunton, IL

Hiawatha Statue – Ironwood, Michigan

Hiawatha Stands 50 feet tall in Ironwood, MI

Heini’s Cheese Shop – Charm, Ohio

Heini’s Cheese Shop – Charm, Ohio

Home of Sliced Bread – Chillicothe, Missouri

Chillicothe, Missouri – The Home of Sliced Bread

Hell’s Half-Acre – Powder River, Wyoming

Hell’s Half Acre Sign in Wyoming off of US Route 20/26
Hell’s Half Acre in Wyoming

Sam Houston Statue – Huntsville, Texas

77 Foot Tall Sam Houston Statue in Huntsville, Texas

Hope, Arkansas

Made it to Hope, AR

Horse Farm Country – Central Kentucky

Horses graze in the fall on a Woodford County farm near Versailles.
Mare and foal jaunt on a farm in Lexington, KY

Hurts Donut – Frisco, Texas

Hurts Donut in Frisco, Texas
Wanna Hurts Donut?

Hyak Ferry – Bremerton, Washington

Riding the Hyak from Bremerton Terminal in Washington
A flock of seagulls on the deck of the Hyak

Harvey Jackson Mural – Kemmerer, Wyoming

Harvey Jackson mural on a corner in Kemmerer, WY

Hershey, Pennsylvania

My children at Hershey Chocolate World in 1990s
Granddaughter Joselyn gives Grampz a Hershey Kiss at Hershey’s Chocolate World

Hung Far Low Chinese – Portland, Oregon

Hung Far Low – Famous Chop Suey and Famous name – Portland, Oregon

Hurricane, West Virginia

Hurricane, West Virginia
A Wall Mural in Hurricane, WV

Horse Capital of the World – Versailles, Kentucky

A mural on a water tower in Versailles, Kentucky

Hamtramck Disneyland – Hamtramck, Michigan

Windmills and Whirlygigs at Hamtramck Disneyland in Detroit
A menagerie of oddball and offbeat things all over the roof, side of the house and the yard – Hamtramck Disneyland

Hutch’s on the Beach – Hamilton, Ontario

Hutch’s on the Beach – Hamilton, Ontario

Hopi Indian Reservation – Walpi, Arizona

While working in Arizona I made over 100 trips to Walpi on the Hopi Indian Reservation in Northern Arizona

Hippos of Hutto, Texas

Greetings from Hutto, home of the Hippos
One of the many Hippos in Hutto, TX

Hells Canyon – Oregon

Hells Canyon Scenic Byway, Oregon
Hells Canyon in northeast Oregon is actually wider and deeper than the Grand Canyon

Hippie Joe’s Gas – Upper Lake, California

Hippie Joe’s Gas in Upper Lake, CA

History of the Niagara Peninsula – Welland, Ontario

A portion of a massive mural on the side of a shopping mall. Entitled “History of the Niagara Peninsula” by Heinz Gaugel

Hi-Line Theatre – Rudyard, Montana

Hi-Line Theatre in Rudyard, Montana – operating since 1949

Hatch, New Mexico

A&W Family in Hatch, NM
A fiberglass Uncle Sam in Hatch, NM with a famous Hatch Green Chile in hand

Hop Bottom, West Virginia

Hop Bottom, WV

Hot Box Cafe – Toronto, Ontario

Hot Box Cafe – Toronto, Ontario

Hugo, Oklahoma

Welcome to Historic Hugo, OK
A building made of petrified wood in Hugo

If you like what you see, you may want to check out my book: Less Beaten Paths of America: Unique Town Names, available on Amazon.  My second book, Less Beaten Paths of America: Quirky and Offbeat Roadside Attractions, will be available in late April or early May 2018. Click on the photo below for more details or to get a copy of the book.

Books 1 & 2

 

(15)

Apple Valley Hillbilly Garden and Toyland – Calvert City, KY

Apple Valley Hillbilly Garden

Down in southwestern Kentucky, Calvert City (near Paducah) there’s a little back road (actually US Highway 68) that takes you to a place called Apple Valley Hillbilly Garden and Toyland. It is not necessarily what you would think of as a “garden,” but it is certainly hillbilly fun. And the toyland is amazing!

I visited there in early February 2018 and had a real good time with the proprietor Keith Holt who, ironically, looks like a hillbilly!

Hanging with the fascinating Keith Holt
Signs at Hillbilly Garden

I will tell you upfront, this place is not for everyone. Some people may look at it is a big junkyard. Others, like myself, look at it as a large folk art gallery. And, along with that is a fabulous toy collection and some smaller collections of things such as soda cans and beer cans, among other things.

When I arrived, I was met by Keith. In his late 50s or early 60s, Keith has shoulder length hair and a penchant for puns! Right down my alley!

A bottle tree (he has a better name — I forgot…)

But Keith is also a folk artist. He has taken all those bottles, old tires, old furniture in computer monitors and wires and cords and any other items it some people might consider trash and then turn those into a fun “garden.“ And he is built it at one level more for creativity by making sure that each story about each piece is some sort of a pun or play on words.

Keith has created at least 40 or 50 different “pieces“ that are stretched over what is probably a good acre of land. He is more than willing to take you on the grand tour and walk you around and tell you the stories behind each of the pieces of art did he is created.

Thronehenge in the Hillbilly Garden
He has a “Bumper Crop” in the garden
Love the “Sorry, We’re Open” sign!!
Flamingos are really tired.
Keith Holt giving his PUNishiing tour of the garden

I got my biggest chuckle out of a large circle of old toilets which I adoringly called “thronehenge. (see above photo)” He has another place with a couple of old mattresses and box springs and, of course, calls them his hillbilly springs or something like that. He has a Christmas tree that has a number of cans hanging from it. The tree is adorned with “Bud lights.“ How Christmas trees have to have lights, right?

I also got a kick out of a display right near the front that had four or five computer monitors including one on a snowboard. This display was called “surfing the web.“ Ha ha Ha ha ha!

Folk Art at Hillbilly Garden
Lawnmower Ranch (an homage to Cadillac Ranch in Texas)
Peace love and Jesus made out of bottles and things
These parishioners are pinned to their seats and bowled over by the preacher apparently
Ooh la la

Keith was throwing out stories to me left and right and puns front and backward. But, as a good blogger and a promoter of sites like this, I don’t want to ruin everything for you, the possible visitor, so you can make your own  visit and enjoy the PUNishment directly from Keith’s mouth! That is definitely the best way to go!

Back Side of Grandpa Oral Wallace’s original building

Keith’s Grandpa Oral Wallace bought an apple orchard and a two room house on 6 acres in November 6, 1928. According to Keith’s website:

“He started making apple cider and selling it at his new produce stand called “Shady Nock”. Then he built an under-ground still hidden in the barn and open up an auto camp with small zoo. He was a musician, so he performed for the guest. In 1931 after hearing HWY 68 was going to be paved the house was added onto so there would be a room to rent. The wood that was left over from the house was used to build a small country store (14’x14′) called Apple Valley. In this small space they had a small barbers chair where Oral would cut hair and a four seat diner where they served chicken dinners.  March 24, 1939 Gulf gas was added. Store/gas station closed down when Oral died February 28, 1964. Grandma Myrtle Wallace went back to selling stuff on the produce stand until 1988. Then in 2005, a change blew in !”

Inside the small original building
Grandpa Wallace’s original geetars and fiddle
Vintage Sign
Kitschy knick knacks and stuff
Old newspaper articles about the place
Fun stuff – even a Frog-a-lope
More knick knacks
Some of the can collections

That particular room is now filled with a lot of memorabilia about the early beginnings of Apple Valley. There is the old violin and guitar that belonged to Grandpa Oral.

There are hundreds of old soda and beer cans throughout the little building.  As a collector (when I was in junior high school), I was thrilled to see the old things, many of which are not around any more.

Can Collection
Old collector editions of RC Cans with baseball players
Old collector Falstaff Beer cans and a few others
And here is an oldie!
One of Keith’s many hand made puppets

Before moving from California to Kentucky, Keith was a puppeteer, actor and artist. He made and performed with puppets. Many of his puppets are also on display in this little building.

But, it’s a good proprietor and guide, Keith with sharp enough to leave the best for last. He walked me back to the yard and into a larger building in the backyard area and I was overwhelmed by the thousands of small toys and characters that he is a mast and put on display in this little place.

Keith with one of his creations
Puppets and other kitsch
Keith Holt is proud of his over 3000 piece Toyland, housed in a separate building on the property
A wide view of the Toyland room

In the Toyland there’s everything from Star Wars to the old little green soldiers that I used to collect as a young child. And anything in between that you can think of. Cars, trains and thousands of participants in the form of little creatures.

This is one of those places where you would need a few hours to actually see and identify all of the pieces.  So much!

A Panorama of the Toyland
Bobble heads galore (yes, that’s Ozzie!)

 

What can you see?
Hi Donald
A gathering of lost toy souls
There are hundreds of “action figures” protecting the Toyland

Keith told me that the collection in that room was only a portion of what he had and that he still has many others in boxes in a big semi truck to the side because he has no place to put them at this particular point.

The toy collection was not only amazing but lots of fun. Many of the toys I had seen do some part of my life and most thoroughly enjoyed reminiscing back about them. There were others that I had not seen. He made a point to show me numerous places where he had taken certain characters, dogs are action figures and put them together in scenarios, some of which you can see in the photos below. I honestly could not keep up with everything because my eyes were so full of eye candy.

Following are a few more scenes:

Hillbilly Garden Car
Who knows?
Whoa!
Scary (the one on the left of course)
Even found an old Roadside America book (no longer in print!!)

(53)

A visit to Damascus, Virginia

Welcome to Damascus
Welcome to Damascus

Last weekend we made a trip to Damascus, VA with the goal of Julianne and our daughter Marissa riding their bikes on the Virginia Creeper Trail, one of many wonderful Rails to Trails bike trails that can be found in this part of the country.

 

Virginia CreeperI will have a different post about the Virginia Creeper Trail as part of my Bike Trail Series, but I wanted to post an article about the non-bike portion of our trip to Damascus, Abingdon, and Bristol, VA.  Besides the bike trail, there is so much more to see and do on a  road trip down to this part of Appalachia.

Stay 3 or more nights & save up to 25% now! At participating hotels

We began our trip by leaving early in the morning on Saturday to drive to Damascus via the towns of Hazard and Whitesburg in Kentucky on US Highways 23 and 119. Once into Virginia, we passed through the small towns of Pound and Wise.

Fog in the Mountains of SE Kentucky near Whitesburg
Fog in the Mountains of SE Kentucky near Whitesburg
Fog in the Mountains south of Hazard, KY. The vegetation is covered with kudzu
Fog in the Mountains south of Hazard, KY. The vegetation is covered with kudzu
Beautiful Highway heading into Virginia
Beautiful Highway heading into Virginia at Pound Gap

The entire drive that morning was beautiful as we passed through the mountains of Kentucky and Virginia. The mountains were laced with fog and low clouds in this beautiful part of Appalachia.  Many of the plants and telephone lines were covered with the invasive Kudzu (also known as Japanese Arrowroot) plant…though obnoxious, it does have its own eerie beauty.

Pound Gap Historical Sign on the Virginia Border
Pound Gap Historical Sign on the Virginia Border
Welcome to Virginia
Welcome to Virginia
Saw this on Business 23 as we entered into Pound, VA. Tried to find a town named Donkey in VA, but couldn't find anything. Oh well...you have a photo of the sign
Saw this on Business 23 as we entered into Pound, VA. Tried to find a town named Donkey in VA, but couldn’t find anything. Oh well…you have a photo of the sign
Pound, VA
Pound, VA

Our first actual stop on the road was right as we entered the town of Pound. As we come down the hill there is a large mural painted on the side of a wall by the highway. As always, I stopped to grab a photo to add to my growing collection of wall murals from around the US and Canada. We then drove through the little village of Pound to see if there was anything interesting, which there wasn’t.  But, these small little towns always have a charm about them.

Pound Mural in Pound, VA
Pound Mural in Pound, VA – 105 feet wide and 25 feet tall painted by Kingsport, TN Tattoo Artist Ben Rigg and Simon Henry. Represents some history of the residents of the area.
The Crooked Road - Virginia Heritage Music Trail
The Crooked Road – Virginia’s Heritage Music Trail

Along US 23 after getting into Virginia, we came across signs that said we were on “The Crooked Road.”  The Crooked Road is Virginia’s Heritage Music Trail, a driving route through the Appalachian Mountains from the Blue Ridge to the Coalfields region, following U.S. Route 58, but also with parts on U.S. Route 23.

The road winds through over 333 miles of scenic terrain in southwest Virginia, including 19 counties, four cities, and 54 towns.  Famed Bluegrass musicians such as Ralph Stanley, Joe Wilson, the Carter Family Fold and others, all hailed from this area.

Crooked Road Historical Sign near the Virginia Border with Kentucky
Crooked Road Historical Sign near the Virginia Border with Kentucky
Welcome to Whitetop, VA
Welcome to Whitetop, VA

From Pound we made our way into Wise, VA on US 23 and just continued on the road to Damascus.  Our trip eventually took us into Abingdon and then on to Damascus. From there we then went up US Highway 58 to Mount Rogers National Recreation Area and near the top of Whitetop Mountain where there is a station called Whitetop Station where the bike trail begins (actually begins about a mile away in North Carolina).

Whitetop Station
Whitetop Station
Dropped off my wife and daughter at Whitetop Station.
Dropped off my wife and daughter at Whitetop Station.
Green Cove Station in Virginia
Green Cove Station in Virginia

It was a beautiful drive up there and they departed on their ride down the hill. Whitetop Station is about 3500′ in altitude and Damascus is at 1952′, so in a 17 mile stretch they would drop about 1600 feet. (I’ll cover that in a separate Bike Trail Post)  After dropping them off, I drove a few mile back to Green Cove Station, which is another stop along the Virginia Creeper Trail.  It was packed with bikers, but is also a very scenic part of the route.

Virginia Creeper Trail shirts for sale at Whitetop Station
Virginia Creeper Trail shirts for sale at Whitetop Station

Both Whitetop and Green Cove have snacks, drinks and also sell some t-shirts and hats, proceeds of which go to benefit the Creeper Trail Association that maintains the trail.

The stations also carry a few tools and some spare tires, etc., that have been donated by other riders.

Certainly worth a brief visit to see their offerings if you are up that way.

A pastoral scene from near the Green Cove Station on the Virginia Creeper Trail
A pastoral scene from near the Green Cove Station on the Virginia Creeper Trail
Unique sign posting on a church in Green Cove -- it is election season 2016
Unique sign posting on a church in Green Cove — it is election season 2016

This area near Green Cove is dotted with Christmas Tree farms and is a lusciously pastoral environment for both the bikers and those tat are driving the back roads. The scene above is indicative (and you can see the Christmas tree grove on the left side).

IMG_6760rev

At the Cross Roads of the Virginia Creeper and Appalachian Trails
At the Cross Roads of the Virginia Creeper and Appalachian Trails

From Green Cove I headed back down to the town of Damascus and drove around. Damascus touts itself as “Trail Town USA.” The reason for this is because many trails seem to converge into this town, most specifically the Appalachian Trail which is America’s most famous hiking trail and then the Virginia Creeper Bike Trail, which is one of the more well-known bike trails. There are apparently a few other trails that come through the area.

A hiker on the Appalachian Trail walks the trail into Damascus
A hiker on the Appalachian Trail walks the trail into Damascus
There is a constant stream of bikers on the Creeper Trail
There is a constant stream of bikers on the Creeper Trail
Damascus calls itself Trail Town USA for a reason. The Appalachian Trail, the Virginia Creeper Trail and others come to a crossroads here.
Damascus calls itself Trail Town USA for a reason. The Appalachian Trail, the Virginia Creeper Trail and others come to a crossroads here.

SunDog

Inside SunDog Outfitters in Damascus, one of many shops catering to the biking and hiking crowd
Inside Sundog Outfitters in Damascus, one of many shops catering to the biking and hiking crowd

The entire town is set up to handle this “trail traffic.” There are outdoor shops, a number of bike shops that sell and rent bikes, there are outfitters that provide the things needed for hiking and camping such as tents and sleeping bags. Many of the eateries in town also cater to this type of crowd, thus giving the town a very relaxed and very friendly atmosphere.  Sundog Outfitters was a great place for this and also has a large bike repair area with most of the items needed.  We know as we had to get a repair done  there during our visit.

A variety of t-shirts and other amenities at SunDog Outfitters
A variety of t-shirts and other amenities at SunDog Outfitters
Hiker painting on a restroom wall in Damascus
Hiker painting on a restroom wall in Damascus

Another thing I liked about the town was the murals. I am always looking for interesting murals and wall paintings. There are 4 or 5 murals including the Trail Town USA mural (shown above) which features a large compass and a life size mural poster of the Appalachian Trail with a pioneer on it.  The Town Park features some interesting murals on the Restroom Walls…one of them I took has become one of my more popular Instagram photos. Following are a couple more I came across.

A nice representation of an old hiker on the Appalachian Trail
A nice representation of an old hiker on the Appalachian Trail
A barber shop mural with the Appalachian Trail logo
A barber shop mural with the Appalachian Trail logo on the Barber Pole
A mural of mountain scenery on the side of a building in Damascus
A mural of mountain scenery on the side of a building in Damascus
One of a number of murals on the side of building along the trail
One of a number of murals on the side of building along the trail
The Inn on Creeper Way - one of many B&B places on the Creeper Trail in Damascus
The Inn on Creeper Way – one of many B&B places on the Creeper Trail in Damascus (see their site HERE)

Unfortunately, as I noted above, Julianne’s bike broke down along the first few miles of the trail and she and Marissa ended up being stranded.  They made their way to the Upbeet Cafe and the Creeper Trail Cafe, located along the trail on Taylor Valley Road, but really way out of the way for a car from Damascus.  Map is below.

CreeperTrailCafeMap
Map of road to get from Damascus to the Creeper Trail Cafe and Upbeet Cafe
Upbeet Cafe
Upbeet Cafe Sign – near Taylors Valley, VA
The Creeper Trail Cafe is along the trail in Taylors Valley...about 20 minutes from Damascus through Tennessee and then back into Virginia.
The Creeper Trail Cafe is along the trail in Taylors Valley…about 20 minutes from Damascus through Tennessee and then back into Virginia.

Actually, the Upbeet Cafe, where Julianne was stranded, is further north up VA 725.  Fortunately, a good Samaritan took her in a truck from the Upbeet to the famed Creeper Trail Cafe where I was able to find her and get the bike loaded.

As a result of the downed bike and the time required to drive to Taylors Valley and back to Damascus, we decided to call it a day and go again on the next day.  So, we drove back into Damascus, got the bike repaired at SunDog and then found our way to a place to eat.

At Damascus Old Mill Inn
At Damascus Old Mill Inn
Mural in Damascus advertising the Old Mill Inn
Mural in Damascus advertising the Old Mill Inn

I am always about eating at local places when on the road and had researched to find that the Old Mill Inn in Damascus was THE place to eat in town.  There are many other eateries, but this one is along the river and overlooks a scenic waterfall.

The view from our table
The view from our table

The thing about this unique eatery is that the menu is upscale and the dining experience is nice, but they cater to the casually dressed bikers and hikers. We were given great treatment by Kara Maguire, who is related to the owners.  And we got a special treat when the Head Chef, John King, came out personally to serve us our unique and tasty dishes.  All this while we sat at a table overlooking the waterfall behind the mill.

A unique duck in the river by Old Mill Inn
A unique Muscovy duck in the river by Old Mill Inn
Head Chef John King presents our dishes at the Old Mill Restaurant.
Head Chef John King presents our dishes at the Old Mill Restaurant.

The atmosphere was casual, but the dining experience was upscale. They first brought us some Asian inspired tacos as an appetizer. These were so good that they disappeared before I could even get a photo!  For dinner, Julianne got a vegan dish called Beet Risotto that included some root vegetables that had been steamed and spiced and were laid on top of the risotto. It was very tasty. I picked up a nice pulled-pork three cheese sandwich with their homemade “Mill Slaw.”  Marissa had a chicken curry sandwich which was also quite amazing.

Julianne had a Beet Risotto with spiced root vegetables. It was delectable
Julianne had a Beet Risotto with spiced root vegetables. It was delectable
David had a Reuben sandwich with three cheeses and their homemade "Mill Slaw". Their tomato dipping sauce was to die for
David had a Pulled Pork with three cheeses and their homemade “Mill Slaw”. Their tomato dipping sauce was to die for

After dinner, we  spent the night in Bristol, Virginia. I had earned a free night through my Choice Hotels points and stayed at Quality Inn and Suites.  It was a nice restful evening as prepared to get up early the next morning to return to Whitetop.

US Hwy 58 in Virginia, near Damascus
US Hwy 58 in Virginia, near Damascus

Our drive up to Whitetop Station on Sunday was phenomenal! Along the roadway there were many places where we saw sunbeams coming through the trees, such as the photos that I have included below.  Reminded me of a reference to Paul the Apostle in Acts 9:3 in the New Testament that says: “And as he journeyed, he came near Damascus: and suddenly there shined round about him a light from heaven.” Indeed, on US 58 near Damascus, we too enjoyed the lights from Heaven on that Sabbath morning.

The Ligfhts from Heaven on US 58 near Damascus
The Lights from Heaven on US 58 near Damascus, VA
More Lights from Heaven on US 58 near Damascus
More Lights from Heaven on US 58 near Damascus, VA
More Lights from Heaven as seen on US 58 near Damascus
More Lights from Heaven as seen on US 58 near Damascus, VA
Stopped at one of the bridges on the way back to Damascus
Stopped at one of the bridges on the way back to Damascus

After dropping them off on the trail,  I made my way back down the road and visited a couple of the bridges and then went on to Damascus and did more driving around town to find old buildings, little bed-and-breakfast places and ultimately a place for us to eat dinner.

At one of the steel bridges on the Virginia Creeper Trail
At one of the steel bridges on the Virginia Creeper Trail
Shuttle Shack - one of many business offering shuttles of bikes to the top of the mountain
Shuttle Shack – one of many business offering shuttles of bikes to the top of the mountain
In the Country Bakery and Eatery on the outskirts of Damascus
In the Country Bakery and Eatery on the outskirts of Damascus

On Sunday we stopped for lunch at a place along the trail called In the Country Bakery and Eatery. There are actually many places along the trail, some of which are actually a challenge to get to via automobile but have been built specifically to handle trail traffic. I

At In the Country Cafe
At In the Country Cafe

already mentioned the Upbeet Cafe and Creeper Cafe above. But on this day we stopped at In the Country which sit on the outskirts of Damascus. They offer sandwiches, baked goods and home made fudge. Their food was reasonable and they had indoor and outdoor seating with a view of the trail across US 58.

Bike Parking at In the Country - a popular place on the trail
Bike Parking at In the Country – a popular place on the trail
Reuben Sandwich and Sweet Potato Fries at In the Country
Reuben Sandwich and Sweet Potato Fries at In the Country
A Nice Salad Offering at In the Country
A Nice Salad Offering at In the Country
Off the Beaten Path Ice Cream in Damascus
Off the Beaten Path Ice Cream in Damascus

On the same site they have a great ice cream place called Off the Beaten Path Ice Cream Shoppe.  It so happened that July 17 was National Ice Cream Day so we all indulged in ice cream.

They offered about 20 different flavors and also had some sherbets so it was perfect for a very warm day.

Ice Cream
Ice Cream
Ice Cream offerings at Off the Beaten Path
Ice Cream offerings at Off the Beaten Path
Ice Cream Chart in Off the Beaten Path... LOL
Ice Cream Chart in Off the Beaten Path… LOL
Celebrating National Ice Cream Day with a nice ice cream cone at Off the Beaten Path
Celebrating National Ice Cream Day with a nice ice cream cone at Off the Beaten Path
Julianne and Marissa on the trail to Abingdon, VA
Julianne and Marissa on the trail to Abingdon, VA

After lunch and a little relaxing Julianne and Marissa took off for the remaining 13 or 14 miles of their trip to Abingdon, Virginia on the Creeper Trail. I too made my way to Abingdon via US Highway 58 and took a couple of detours to get photos of the trail with them riding on it.  I also found a couple of nice bridge shots along the way.

Apparently, the last few miles of the trail to Abingdon have a grueling gradual uphill climb, but not nearly the altitude change.  Indeed, Damascus sits at 1952′ while Abingdon is at 2087′, which means about a 100′ rise.  However, there was still some downhill from Damascus apparently.

Trestle #4 near Abingdon, VA - one of 47 trestles on the 32 mile trail
Trestle #4 near Abingdon, VA – one of 47 trestles on the 32 mile trail
For obvious reasons....no parking
For obvious reasons….no parking
This old Pepsi machine sits along the side of the Creeper Trail west of Damascus. Don't think it works anymore -- HA
This old Pepsi machine sits along the side of the Creeper Trail west of Damascus. Don’t think it works anymore — HA
An old house with License Plate Siding. This was seen along the trail
An old house with License Plate Siding. This was seen along the trail
Bridge Number 4 near Watauga Rd. close to Abingdon
Bridge Number 4 near Watauga Rd. close to Abingdon
Welcome to Abingdon, VA
Welcome to Abingdon, VA

I got to Abingdon much earlier than they did and was able to drive around the little town, which also caters to the biking crowd and to the hiking crowd.  I discovered a movie complex with great wall art so had to grab a couple of shots.  Always like fun Wall Art.

Main Street, including the large courthouse, in Abingdon, VA
Main Street, including the large courthouse, in Abingdon, VA
Street corner in Abingdon, VA
Street corner in Abingdon, VA
Wall Art at the Abingdon Cinemall
Wall Art at the Abingdon Cinemall
More art at Abingdon Cinemall
More art at Abingdon Cinemall
Virginia Creeper Welcome Center - Abingdon, VA
Virginia Creeper Welcome Center – Abingdon, VA

Abingdon has a Virginia Creeper Welcome Center at the end of the trail and it includes many old relics from the railroad and also has the last train engine to ride along that railroad from the 1980s. The final bridge, bridge number one, is the end of the trail and in that vicinity there are other little things to see.

The Old Engine of the Creeper - last train to run the rails in the 1980s
The Old Engine of the Creeper – last train to run the rails in the 1980s
Sumoflam with Virginia Creeper engine in Abingdon
Sumoflam with Virginia Creeper engine in Abingdon
Signage at the Abingdon Trailhead - Bridge Number 1
Signage at the Abingdon Trailhead – Bridge Number 1
Julianne and Marissa at the end of the trail in Abingdon
Julianne and Marissa at the end of the trail in Abingdon – after 37 miles

DSC_6819After we loaded the bikes, we departed for Kentucky via Bristol, VA where we had spent the night previously. Bristol, VA is one of those unique towns that actually is split into two states. The drive along State Street will feature flags of the United States and Virginia on one side of the highway and flags of Tennessee and the United States on the other side. There are theaters, and number of murals in the town and the fairly well known large archway that welcomes people to Bristol.

Welcome to Bristol. I took this from the Tennessee side of the road.
Welcome to Bristol. I took this from the Tennessee side of the road.
The Tennessee side of State Street in Bristol, VA
The Tennessee side of State Street in Bristol, VA
Part of a large mural in Bristol
Part of a large mural in Bristol
State Street in Bristol -- left side is Tennessee, right side is Virginia, yellow line is state border
State Street in Bristol — left side is Tennessee, right side is Virginia, yellow line is state border
Old Wall Advertisement in Bristol
Old Wall Advertisement in Bristol
Enter sign at Pal's Sudden Service
Enter sign at Pal’s Sudden Service

While driving through town we came across a fast food place called Pal’s Sudden Service.  We didn’t stop there to eat (we were already full), but I loved the unique building design — totally quirky.  And I really got a kick out of their  road sign — Exercise Daily.   The building only has drive thru windows and no other windows. But the giant hot dog and hamburger can’t be missed!  They apparently are located mainly in east Tennessee and southwest Virginia, with 28 shops dotting this region.  The company got its start in Kingsport, TN, where the original Pal’s still sits with its giant Burger Holding Muffler Man statue (looks like I need another trip!)

A Pal's Sudden Service building. Lots of fun and it looks like the food is great too.
A Pal’s Sudden Service building. Lots of fun and it looks like the food is great too.
After eating Pal's food make sure to Exercise Daily. Couldn't help but chuckle
After eating Pal’s food make sure to Exercise Daily. Couldn’t help but chuckle
Cumberland Gap Tunnel where Kentucky, Virginia and Tennessee meet
Cumberland Gap Tunnel where Kentucky, Virginia and Tennessee meet

Our Drive back to Lexington from Bristol took us through Cumberland Gap and we were able to take the famed Cumberland Gap Tunnel which brought us into the town of Middlesboro.

Originally completed in October 1996, the tunnels each carry two-lanes of traffic.  Each tunnel was bored through 4100-feet of solid rock. At the tallest point, the tunnels are 30-feet high. Cross passages, located every 300-feet, connect the two tunnels and are equipped with fire extinguishers and phones for emergency use.

Exiting the Cumberland Gap tunnel into Kentucky
Exiting the Cumberland Gap tunnel into Kentucky

Since the mountain releases approximately 450 gallons of water every minute, thick PVC liner around the tunnels ensures that the bores stay dry. Air quality is monitored constantly by electronic sensors, and ventilation fans are located every 600-feet to keep air circulating in the tunnel. Variable message board signs are located in the Cumberland Gap vicinity to warn drivers of impending hazardous traffic and weather conditions or to direct traffic flow. AM and FM radio stations can be overridden with emergency messages as well.

Welcome to Middlesboro, KY
Welcome to Middlesboro, KY

The town of Middlesboro, KY is one a few towns in the United States or perhaps even the world, that is built completely within the confines of a meteor crater. We stopped there for dinner at a Mexican restaurant and enjoyed some fairly good food. From there we zipped back up through Barbourville and Corbin and then back into Lexington.

Sunflower taken at the end of Virginia Creeper Trail in Abingdon, VA
Sunflower taken at the end of Virginia Creeper Trail in Abingdon, VA

It was a quick two day trip, but it was very fun and the scenery was amazing. The mountains of Appalachia especially in southeast Kentucky southwest Virginia and Northeast Tennessee are very beautiful. We look forward to taking another trip to the area in October when the colors should all be changed.   Needless to say, the summer brings its own variety of colors in the wildflowers, some of which I captured in digital form…another plus to a trip like this!

Flowers as seen along the Virginia Creeper Trail
Flowers as seen along the Virginia Creeper Trail
A field of Chicory wildflowers Virginia/Kentucky border
A field of Chicory wildflowers Virginia/Kentucky border
Bee on a Chicory Bloom
Bee on a Chicory Bloom
A pink hibiscus growing near a cafe in Damascus, VA
A pink hibiscus growing near a cafe in Damascus, VA

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