April 2018 Cross-Country Road Trip: The Overview – Kentucky to Washington

Sumoflam on the Road Again

In April 2018 I took a nice long road trip from my home in Lexington, Kentucky to my daughter’s home in Port Orchard, Washington and back.  Though I was gone for 15 days, I spent nine of them traveling more than 6000 miles through 14 states.  Many of my stops were in anticipation of my new book as I wanted some fresh content to add to it.

Lots of great two-lanes on this trip

In the past, I typically wrote one or two huge blog posts about long roadtrips, but, I have decided that a focus on some of the sites would be more apropos, so I am providing a general overview of my trip herein with maps and a few photos.  Following there will be a number of posts about many of the places I visited along the way.

Lexington to Storm Lake, Iowa – about 900 miles on Day 1 and 2

DAY 1/2 – Lexington to Storm Lake, Iowa

Stopped to see Peter Toth’s Whispering Giants

My first two days were quite eventful as I drove nearly 900 miles with an overnight stay in Bloomington, IL and then proceeded northwest to Storm Lake, Iowa for night two.  The weather was rainy and yucky most of the way and by the afternoon of Day 2, had turned into snow and, in some cases, blizzard-like conditions.  Not fun!

I had very few stops along the way, with the only planned stops being at four locations to see four of Peter Toth’s amazing Whispering Giants.  My next post will be all about the Whispering Giants I visited on this trip and also in past trips.

Stopped at Starved Rock State Park near Utica, Illinois and was pleasantly surprised
If driving through northeast Iowa, a stop at the home of American Pickers is always fun.
Storm Lake, Iowa to Belle Fourche, South Dakota – about 680 miles

 

Day 3 – Storm Lake, Iowa to Belle Fourche, South Dakota

Dignity is a stainless steel, 50-foot-tall statue was specifically designed by sculptor Dale Lamphere to honor the cultures of the Lakota and Dakota people.

Day 3 was really one of my typical road trip days with plenty of stops along the way, but it was slowed down considerably due to the snow and icy conditions.  Despite that, I visited places such as the Corn Palace (a required stop on a route like this as it changes each year), Wall Drug and a few in between.  The highlight of this day was seeing the amazing (and fairly new) fifty foot tall Dignity statue at a rest area overlooking Chamberlain and Oacoma, South Dakota.  The work was meticulous and lovely.

The Sunset Motel in Belle Fourche, SD

I decided to stay at a non-chain older Motel on this night and ended up at the cozy little Sunset Motel.  In fact, I got there about sunset and was even able to grab a photo of the sunset with the Sunset Motel sign.  This is the kind of motel that still has a real key on an old plastic diamond key holder.

Can’t skip the Corn Palace – a major roadside attraction. Changes every year.
Can’t skip the 80 foot tall Wall Drug Dino!!
Day 4 – Belle Fourche, SD to Wallace, Idaho

Day 4 – Belle Fourche, South Dakota to Wallace, Idaho

Snowy morning in Belle Fourche

I woke up to a cold, snowy morning in Belle Fourche on April 5. It was a concern as I knew I would need to be driving through a mountain range across southern Montana on US 212.  Fortunately, the roads weren’t bad until I got up on the pass and then they cleared up with occasional snow showers through Billings, Bozeman and Butte.  I was slowed down somewhat, so I ended up stopping in the small mountain town of Wallace, Idaho for the night.

Snow in Broadus, Montana
Stardust Motel in Wallace, Idaho

Once again, I stayed at a cool little motel called the Stardust Motel, ironically in the same room number I had the night before. In both cases, I did not request the room numbers.

Wallace is a really unique, touristy town nestled in the Idaho mountains.  I’ll have a blog post about this town over the next couple of weeks.

I did get to see some beautiful scenery on the trip and even visited my old high school in Bozeman, Montana as I made my way north towards Idaho.

Snow covered Teepees in Crow Agency, Montana
The interstate near Livingston, Montana
Men’s restroom door in Northern Cheyenne country – Ashland, Montana
Road Trip Day 5 – Wallace, Idaho to Port Orchard, Washington

Day 5 – Wallace, Idaho to Port Orchard, Washington

Sumoflam and Roger Vollmer, former boss from Nava-Hopi tours.

One of the highlights of my trip was visiting an old friend and former boss from my days as a tour guide for Nava-Hopi Tours in Flagstaff, AZ in the 1980s.  Roger Vollmer, who later purchased and then sold the company, now resides in upper Idaho and I was able to drop by Cracker Barrel in Coeur d’Alene and have a nice breakfast and a couple of hours of reminiscing.  Honestly, Roger really helped me lay the foundation in my work ethic and I had a blast working with him.  It was good to see him.

The US 2 Sign at Stevens Pass in Washington

Another great part of this portion of my road trip was hitting US Route 2 from Coeur d’Alene and traveling it all the way to the end in Everett, Washington.  I have now traveled that highway from Ironwood, Michigan all the way to Washington.  I still have a small portion from Eastern Michigan to Ironwood and about 450 miles from Maine to New York to be able to say have driven the entire length.  I have driven all of US 66 and all of US 89 at one time or another.

US 2 from Spokane west goes through Washington’s high desert and then eventually into the Cascades and up over Steven’s Pass, which still had snow on both sides of the highway, almost six feet deep in places.  It was spectacular!

A snowy stop sign at Steven’s Pass in Washington
The view of the Cascades as seen from the Skykomish / Gold Bar area of Washington, east of Everett.

Upon arrival in Port Orchard, I spent a week with my daughter and her family.  We took the ferry into Seattle, I traveled with grandchildren to see the rocky beaches and watch seagulls.  Following are just a couple of pics from the visit.

With some of the karvings at Kountry Krazy Kreatures in Kingston, WA
Seattle as seen from Manchester, WA
Granddaughter Livvy poses in the rocks
A seagull gathers clams in Sinclair Inlet near Port Orchard
Also saw this bald eagle flyover me at Sinclair Inlet
Some of the buildings of downtown Seattle
A beach scene in Manchester, WA

Finally, early on Saturday, April 14, I was back on the road, heading south towards Portland and eventually east, to spend the night in Bend, Oregon.

Port Orchard, WA to Bend, Oregon

Travel Day 6 – Port Orchard, Washington to Bend, Oregon

As with some of my other travel days, I had to deal with rain and fog for the first part of the trip.  I had hoped for a fun drive down part of US 101 and, despite the weather, I really had a great drive, even if I only drive about 450 miles.  Unlike some of the other drives, I enjoyed forests, mountains, snow, ocean scenes and eventually high desert scenes.  I also made a stop in Olympia, Washington’s state capital, and visited some friends for breakfast.  I’ll have separate posts about Olympia and its awesome wall art/murals.  I’ll also have a nice post about the town of Raymond, Washington.

One of many murals in Olympia, WA
Raymond, WA has an entire community of lifesize metal people
Zigzag, Oregon
US 101 near Allyn, WA
Ran into Bigfoot in Allyn, WA. At least he was smiling
Drove over Mt. Hood highway heading southeast out of Portland
The high deserts of central Oregon are lovely.

Travel Day 7 – Bend, Oregon to Murray, Utah

Day 7: Driving from Bend to Murray, UT thru Nevada

Day 7 of  my driving days was a long day through nearly 750 miles of high desert through Oregon and Nevada.  My destination was my old hometown of Murray, Utah.  The drive from Bend, OR to Denio, NV is pretty much through high desert.  I took the Frenchglen Highway, which was a beautiful drive on a beautiful day. really not many places to stop along the way.  I’ll have a separate post about the Frenchglen Highway (including Brothers, Frenchglen and Fields).  It had also been over 40 years since I had set foot in Nevada, so it was fun to get travel blog photos.  I spent the night at the home of one of my best friends and had dinner with some of my high school friends and their wives.  Great times!

Standing in the middle of the road…no cars..on the Frenchglen Highway in central Oregon
Another scene from SE Oregon
Finally back in Nevada…at Denio, NV
Downtown Winnemucca, NV
The Bonneville Salt Flats in Utah
Hanging with Friends

Travel Day 8 – Murray, Utah to Manitou Springs, Colorado

Travel Day 8 – Murray, UT to Manitou Springs, CO
Hitting the Colorado border

Day 8 of travel was another long  day as I drove nearly 600 miles from Murray, Utah to Manitou Springs, Colorado. This day once again took me through deserts, high deserts, mountain passes and into some beautiful country. I hit the town of Helper, UT which is nestled in a canyon and was a railroad and mining town.  Also passed through Price.  When working for a record and tape rack jobber back in 1974-75, I made weekly trips to Helper and Price.  Things have changed considerably. Crescent Junction had a unique place, Papa Joe’s, which I’ll write about separately.

Papa Joe’s in Crescent Junction – fun “tourist trap”
Soldier Summit, UT between Spanish Fork, UT and Price, UT on US Rt. 6. Elevation 7,477
Another Whispering Giant by Peter Toth, in Murray, UT

The drive from Grand Junction through Delta, Montrose, Gunnison and Buena Vista was absolutely beautiful (US Hwy 50), especially going over Monarch Pass at 11,312 feet in altitude. On the way down the hill towards Poncha Springs I even go to see a couple of mountain goats crossing the roads.

Once again, I stayed in a local motel.  Always interesting.

 

Monarch Pass – the Continental Divide at 11,312 feet in Colorado
Just barely was able to whip out the camera to catch this mountain goat
Old Hotel Neon in Helper, Utah
A scene from US 50 in Colorado near Cimarron
Mule deer taken near Poncha Springs, CO
US 50 East of Gunnison near Monarch, CO
Stayed at the Silver Saddle Motel in Manitou Springs

Travel Day 9 – Manitou Springs, Colorado to Kansas City, Missouri

Day 9 drive from Manitou Springs, CO to Kansas City, MO
Entering Kansas on US 40 near Weskan, Kansas

Talk about a long, straight drive.  Made the trip from Manitou Springs, after a visit to Garden of the Gods, (which I’ll write about in a separate post), and went through the deserts of eastern Colorado and Western Kansas on a super windy and dusty day.  Did catch a pretty amazing sunset as a result of the dust storms.  I decided to really go back roads on this leg of the trip by taking the straight as an arrow drive on Colorado Hwy 94 through Yoder, Rush and Punkin Center.  The highway eventually met US Hwy 287 near Wild Horse, CO. Basically, the highway was 85.5 miles long running almost perfectly west to east the entire length.

Garden of the Gods near Manitou Springs
Colorado Hwy 94 – 85 miles of straight highway in the middle of nowhere
Punkin Center, Colorado

I finally got to stop at a place to eat in Kit Carson, Colorado and then continued east on US 40 in Kansas through Cheyenne Wells, Sharon Springs and Oakley, where I got on to Interstate 70 to finish up the ride into Kansas City.   I was fortunate to stay with my good friend Brad Sweeten in KC.

Lunch at Kit Carson Trading Post
Kansas Sunset near Abilene, Kansas

Travel Day 10 – Kansas City, Missouri to home in Lexington, Kentucky

Travel Day 10 – the last leg. Kansas City, Missouri to Lexington, Kentucky
Driving with the windows open and the wind blowing through my hair

On the last day it was pretty much straight through driving. I enjoyed another beautiful sunrise east of Kansas City and then just made my way home with a couple of restroom and gas stops along the way.  What a long, wonderful trip it was!

Over 6000 miles, 14 states, 5 motels, lots of friends and time with family. I traveled through blizzards, rainstorms, snow covered mountain passes, high desert, long lonely highways. Enjoyed sunsets, sunrises, good meals at local places.  Saw eagles, mountain goats, mule deer, hawks and assortment of water fowl.  And, of course, a variety of roadside attractions along the way.

Back in Kentucky
The Shelbyville Horse at the Kentucky Welcome Center near Shelbyville

ENJOY THE RIDE!  CHOOSE HAPPY!

If you like what you see, you may want to check out my book: Less Beaten Paths of America: Unique Town Names, available on Amazon.  My second book, Less Beaten Paths of America: Quirky and Offbeat Roadside Attractions, is currently being worked on and I hope to make it available in late May or early June 2018. Click on the photo below for more details or to get a copy of the book.

Books 1 & 2

(78)

A to Z Challenge: The R Towns #atozchallenge

During the month of April I am participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge. The challenge has each blogger select a theme and then do a post thematically from A to Z during each day of April , except Sundays. My blog is number 1337 out of 1670 participating blogs. This year my A to Z posts will take you across the back roads of America to many unique what other bloggers will be posting about, check out the link: A to Z Theme Reveal List for 2016

RThe R Towns

Roswell, New Mexico

Let's Crash in Roswell wall art
Let’s Crash in Roswell wall art

Have a Coke and a Smile?? Coke machine in Roswell...
Have a Coke and a Smile?? Coke machine in Roswell…

UFOs in Roswell
UFOs in Roswell

Need some alien stuff? Plenty in Roswell
Need some alien stuff? Plenty in Roswell

King's Treasure World, Roswell
King’s Treasure World, Roswell

More Art in Roswell, NM
More Art in Roswell, NM

Alien Matador greets guests at El Toro Bravo Mexican Restaurant in Roswell, NM
Alien Matador greets guests at El Toro Bravo Mexican Restaurant in Roswell, NM
How can I do a post about towns that start with the letter R and NOT include Roswell, New Mexico?  I can’t!!  Roswell is perhaps the most out of this world town in the United States (I’ll cover Vulcan, Alberta as Canada’s out of this world town in the V Towns post next week). On a return trip from Arizona, my daughter, son and grandchildren drove through Roswell and then home through Texas.  I didn’t write a post about this trip though I do have a number of photos from the trip on my Pinterest and SmugMug pages.  Roswell is a fun place!

Regent, North Dakota

Welcome to Regent and Enchanted Highway Road Map
Welcome to Regent and Enchanted Highway Road Map

Sumoflam on the Enchanted Highway near Regent, ND
Sumoflam on the Enchanted Highway near Regent, ND

Enchanted Highway Gift Shop in Regent, ND - closed the day were there
Enchanted Highway Gift Shop in Regent, ND – closed the day were there

Enchanted Highway in North Dakota
Enchanted Highway in North Dakota

Enchanted Highway Stop #5 - Pheasants on the Prairie
Enchanted Highway Stop #5 – Pheasants on the Prairie

Fisherman's Dream, one of the many Ginormous scrap metal sculptures on the Enchanted Highway
Fisherman’s Dream, one of the many Ginormous scrap metal sculptures on the Enchanted Highway
Regent, North Dakota is the southern Gateway to the Enchanted Highway, one of the most amazing offbeat and quirky drives in the United States. The 32 mile drive features a number of pieces of the unique (and massive) artwork of retired Regent, ND school teacher Gary Greff who has taken on this effort in order to keep the small dying town from becoming a ghost town.  To me, this is a Top Ten Road Trip Destination.  One of my most popular posts on this blog is my complete photo/travel review of Regent and the Enchanted Highway.  Check it out – complete with maps, descriptions, mile points, satellite photos — its right HERE.

Rhinelander, Wisconsin

Autumn and "Grampz" with the Hodag of Rhinelander, WI
Autumn and “Grampz” with the Hodag of Rhinelander, WI
In 2012 I took a three day trip to Wisconsin with one of my daughters and her daughter.  We visited Jurustic Park (see my M Town Posts), Green Bay, Egg Harbor (see my E Town Posts) and also made our way north on US 51 until we hit US 8 and then headed east toward Rhinelander, also known as the “Heart of Hodag Country.”  What, pray tell, is a Hodag? There is a great unique writeup HERE. According to the Rhinelander website, the Hodag is a mysterious woodland creature that makes its home in the Rhinelander Area. Why the Hodag is only found in the Rhinelander Area is not certain. However, many people believe that it is the clean lakes, dense forests and incredible natural beauty that ties the Hodag to the Rhinelander Area.  See more about this trip HERE.

Rabbit Hash, Kentucky

Welcome to Rabbit Hash, KY
Welcome to Rabbit Hash, KY

Rabbit Hash General Store
Rabbit Hash General Store

Rabbit Has Mayor - Lucy Lou
Rabbit Has Mayor – Lucy Lou
One of the country’s uniquely named towns is a small Ohio River town known as Rabbit Hash, Kentucky.  According to the Rabbit Hash website: “The town’s name, “Rabbit Hash” is said to have originated during the flood of 1847 when the abundant local rabbit population was driven to higher ground and became a food staple in a special stew called “hash.” Little documented history of Rabbit Hash actually survives, primarily because devastating Ohio River floods in 1884, 1913 and 1937 deluged the little town and ruined many records.”  See more about my 2008 visit to Rabbit Hash.  A fun side trip for anyone!  Read it HERE.

Raton, New Mexico

Raton Theatre in Raton, NM
Raton Theatre in Raton, NM

El Kapp Motel in Raton, NM
El Kapp Motel in Raton, NM
Head south on Interstate 25 out of Trinidad, Colorado, cross into New Mexico and you come into the throwback touristy town of Raton, NM, which is also at the intersection of US Highways 64 and 87. The town is dotted with 50s and 60s style neon signs and motels, a nice retro downtown area and a great Visitor’s Center. You can see more about my Colorado/New Mexico trip and my visit to Raton HERE.

Red Lodge, Montana

Welcome to Red Lodge, Montana
Welcome to Red Lodge, Montana

The Red Lodge Cafe sports an old classic neon sign.
The Red Lodge Cafe sports an old classic neon sign.

Detail of the "Whispering Giant" of Red Lodge, Montana...one of many across the country
Detail of the “Whispering Giant” of Red Lodge, Montana…one of many across the country

Visiting the Beartooth Scenic Highway in Wyoming in 2014
Visiting the Beartooth Scenic Highway in Wyoming in 2014

View of the Beartooths from the highway was awesome
View of the Beartooths from the highway was awesome
Red Lodge, Montana is one of the gateways to the Beartooth Scenic Highway (US Highway 212), perhaps one of the most scenic and splendid high mountain drives in the country. The town itself is beautiful, though touristy as it also promotes itself as a Gateway to Yellowstone National Park as well. Read about my 2014 Beartooth Highway and Red Lodge experience in more detail HERE.

Riverside, Iowa (Honorable Mention)

Starship Riverside in Riverside, Iowa
Starship Riverside in Riverside, Iowa

Star Trek Visitor Center - Riverside, IA
Star Trek Visitor Center – Riverside, IA

Future Birthplace of James T. Kirk
Future Birthplace of James T. Kirk
If you are a Star Trek fan than you know about Riverside, Iowa.  It is most likely the only town you can find that is the FUTURE BIRTHPLACE of someone, in this case, Captain James T. Kirk, who is scheduled to be born on March 2, 2228. Touting itself as the place “Where the Trek Begins,” you can find some Star Trek memorabilia, a Starship replica and more.

Rugby, North Dakota (Honorable Mention)

Rugby, ND - The Geographic Center of North America
Rugby, ND – The Geographic Center of North America

The Rugby Geographical Center of North America monument juxtaposed with the HUB Motel sign in Rugby, ND
The Rugby Geographical Center of North America monument juxtaposed with the HUB Motel sign in Rugby, ND

Rugby, ND in 2014
Rugby, ND in 2014

Unique Water Tower in Rugby, ND
Unique Water Tower in Rugby, ND
You may think North Dakota is in the northern climes, but, actually, when considering North America, it is almost in the middle.  In fact, the small town of Rugby IS the Geographical Center of North America. Not too far off of US Highway 2 in North Dakota, its a good photo opportunity.  See more about my US Highway 2 Zip Trip across North Dakota HERE.

Rudyard, Montana (Honorable Mention)

Welcome to Rudyard ... one of the classic signs, "Lots of nice people and one sorehead"
Welcome to Rudyard … one of the classic signs, “Lots of nice people and one sorehead”

Rudyard Depot Museum
Rudyard Depot Museum

The dinosaur sculpture off of US Highway 2 near Rudyard, made by farmer Byron Wolery of Inverness, MT
The dinosaur sculpture off of US Highway 2 near Rudyard, made by farmer Byron Wolery of Inverness, MT
Further west on US Highway 2 in Montana is the town of Rudyard. They claim to have 596 Nice People and 1 Old Sore Head as can be seen by the sign above. Even though the town is small, they also have a small museum, which apparently has some dinosaur-related things.  You can read more about the town and surrounding towns on Montana’s Hi-Line (US Highway 2) — HERE.

Did You Miss My Other A to Z Challenge Posts? Click on a letter below to see the others.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Learn More About the A to Z Challenge and visit hundreds of other participating blogs (click logo below)

A2Z-BADGE [2016]

(50)

Traveling US Numbered Highways – Part I: An Overview and History

US 89 and US 2 meet up in northern Montana
US 89 and US 2 meet up in northern Montana

When I was young and living in Albuquerque, NM in the 1960s, there were not many Interstate Highways.  Most of the country still relied on the U.S. Numbered Highway System.

Even to this day I can recall our family drives along the iconic Route 66 out of Albuquerque to Gallup, NM and then, eventually, when we moved to Dallas in 1968 we took it all the way to Amarillo, TX.  Even at that young age I was already enamored by the maze of highways and the desire to see what lays along these long black roads with millions of white lines in the middle and endless telephone poles and wires along both sides.  I too remember the many billboards advertising Stuckey’s roadside stops, gas station or unique tourist attractions.

Albuquerque as I knew it in the 1960s (Really!!) Official caption: Traffic in the streets of Albuquerque, New Mexico after a heavy downpour. Original Publication: Colour Photography book. (Photo by Ernst Haas/Getty Images )
Albuquerque as I knew it in the 1960s (Really!!).  This was Central Avenue, which was part of Route 66.  Official caption: Traffic in the streets of Albuquerque, New Mexico after a heavy downpour. Original Publication: Color Photography book. (Photo by Ernst Haas/Getty Images )
Historic Route 66 in Illinois
Historic Route 66 in Illinois

Since those days I have had the opportunity to travel many of these wonderful highways that ribbon across this glorious country.  They highways have taken me through deserts, mountains, mosquito-infested lake areas, the high plains, through small towns and big cities.  As I near 60 years old the fascination with these highways continues and I drive them every chance I get!!

Map of Current US Highways By SPUI - Own work / Base map is http://www.nationalatlas.gov/printable/images/pdf/reference/genref.pdf, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=944944
Map of Current US Highways
By SPUI – Own work / Base map is http://www.nationalatlas.gov/printable/images/pdf/reference/genref.pdf, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=944944

The current system of United States Numbered Highways (also called U.S. Routes or U.S. Highways) is an integrated network of roads and highways numbered within a nationwide grid in the contiguous United States. The roadways have always been maintained by state or local governments since their initial designation in 1926.

Old Lincoln Highway sign - from the Federal Highway Administration website
Old Lincoln Highway sign – from the Federal Highway Administration website
Carl Fisher, creator of the numbered highway system and also the Indianapolis Speedway
Carl Fisher, creator of the numbered highway system and also the Indianapolis Speedway

According to an article entitled “From Names to Numbers: The Origins of the U.S. Numbered Highway System” by Richard F. Weingroff of the Federal Highway Administration, highway numbering didn’t get started until 1926.  Prior to that time there were just a couple of cross country roads, known as trails back then.  These would include the Lincoln Highway (a direct route from New York City to San Francisco) and the Victory Highway (New York City to San Francisco via Baltimore).  The idea of the Lincoln Highway came from the fertile mind of Carl Fisher, the man also responsible for the Indianapolis Motor Speedway and Miami Beach. With help from fellow industrialists Frank Seiberling and Henry Joy, an improved, hard-surfaced road was envisioned that would stretch almost 3400 miles from coast to coast, New York to San Francisco, over the shortest practical route.

Weingroff notes:

The trails were a product of the pioneer days of auto travel when government took little interest in interstate roads. Most long distance trips, even by the most avid advocate of the automobile, took place in the comfort of the Nation’s railroads. Although named trails can be traced to the 1890’s, the movement began in earnest in the early 1910’s, with the National Old Trails Road (Baltimore to Los Angeles) and the Lincoln Highway setting the pattern. Boosters selected a route over existing–often, just barely existing–roads, gave it a colorful name, formed an association to promote the trail, and collected dues from businesses and towns along the way. The associations published trail guides and newsletters, held annual conventions, and promoted the improvement and use of their route. The goals were to promote the road, the good roads cause, and economic opportunity for the cities and businesses along the way.

Lincoln Highway after numbering
Lincoln Highway after numbering

In March 1925, the American Association of State Highway Officials (AASHO) started planning the federal highway system. Major east-west routes would be numbered in multiples of ten, from U.S. 10 across the north to U.S. 90 across the south. The major north-south routes would end in 1 or 5, from U.S. 1 between Maine and Florida to U.S. 101 between Washington and California. The Lincoln Highway was then broken up into U.S. 1, U.S. 30, U.S. 530, U.S. 40 and U.S. 50 (see above). The Lincoln Highway Association was created in 1913 to promote the Lincoln Highway using private and corporate donations. The public responded favorably, and many other named roads across the country followed.

The Lincoln Highway Map from lincolnhighwayassoc.org
The Lincoln Highway Map from lincolnhighwayassoc.org

Today the Lincoln Highway Association maintains an informative and history-filled website (see it here) about the first real cross country highway.

US 212 East on Beartooth Highway
US 212 East on Beartooth Highway

As I mentioned, the numbering of highways began in earnest in 1925. Generally, north-to-south highways are odd-numbered, with lowest numbers in the east, the area of the founding thirteen states of the United States, and highest in the west. Similarly, east-to-west highways are typically even-numbered, with the lowest numbers in the north, where roads were first improved most intensively, and highest in the south. Major north–south routes have numbers ending in “1” while major east–west routes have numbers ending in “0”.  Expansion of the system continued until 1956, when the Interstate Highway System was formed. After construction was completed, many U.S. Routes were replaced by Interstate Highways for through traffic. Despite the Interstate system, U.S. Highways still form many important regional connections, and new routes are still being added.

Scenes from US 89
Scenes from US 89

Throughout my years of driving, I have been blessed to be able to traverse thousands of miles of these numbered US highways.  In some instances, I have covered the entirety of the routes (over a number of trips).  For instance, from the 1970s to as late as 2014, I covered the entire north/south path of US 89, from Canada to Mexico.  I have been on most of US 66, US 61, US 20 and many others.

Official Route 66 Roadside Attraction
Official Route 66 Roadside Attraction

Some of the US Highways traverse the entire length of the country east to west or north to south.   Some of the longest of these are listed below:

25px-US_20.svgUS Highway 20 from Boston, MA to Yellowstone NP to Newport, OR – 3,237 miles

US_6.svgUS Highway 6 from Provincetown, MA to Bishop, CA – 3,207 miles

25px-US_30.svgUS Highway 30 from Atlantic City, NJ to Astoria, OR

25px-US_50.svgUS Highway 50 from Ocean City, MD to Sacramento, CA – 3,011 miles

US_2.svgUS Highway 2 from Houlton, ME to Rouses Point, NY and then starts again at St. Ignace, MI and goes all the way to Everett, WA – 2,572 miles (combined)

US_1.svgUS Highway 1 from Fort Kent, ME on the border with Canada to Key West, FL – 2,377 miles

31px-US_101.svgUS Highway 101 from Olympia, WA to Los Angeles, CA – 1,519 miles

25px-US_66.svgUS Highway 66 – the famed Route 66 – from Chicago, IL to Santa Monica, CA – 2,451 miles (though much has been replaced by I-10, I-15, I-40, I-44 and I-55)

US_61.svgUS Highway 61 – the Great River Road along the Mississippi River and then the Blues Highway in Mississippi – from Wyoming, MN to New Orleans, LA – 1,400 miles

25px-US_89.svgUS Highway 89 – goes along many of the US National Parks including Glacier NP, Yellowstone NP, Bryce Canyon NP, Zion NP and the Grand Canyon – from just north of Babb, MT on the Canadian border to Flagstaff, AZ.  Continues 89A south through Sedona and then onto Nogales (according to the US 89 Society website) – officially 1,247 miles, but the US 89 Society shows it as 1,800 miles)

DSC_5062Currently there are numbered highways from US 1 all the way to US 830 and a couple hundred in between. I have not been on a good number of these, but many of the cross country ones have felt the wheels of my cars and my footprints.  I have been on US 1 along many parts of the Atlantic Coast and have traveled much of US 101 on the Pacific Coast.  I have traveled the length of US 89 and have been on most of US 2 from Michigan to Montana.

DSC_7579Over the course of my next few posts, I will address my travels on the US Numbered Highways and note some of the wonderful places that can be seen along these routes.

US Highways 71 and 59 in Arkansas
US Highways 71 and 59 in Arkansas

 

 

(227)