Experiencing Old-Timey Decatur, Texas

Heading north out of Keller, Texas on US 287 you can enjoy a scenic ride and make your way into the town of Decatur, Texas.  Named after naval hero Stephen Decatur, the town was originally set up in 1856 and eventually was a stopover for ranchers and herders on the Chisholm Trail.

The old Eighter from Decatur Sign

By 1882, the railway came into Decatur from Fort Worth.  It was apparently at that time a gambling railway worker was talking about a female from Decatur and coined the phrase an “Eighter from Decatur,” which has stuck around ever since.

Welcome to Decatur sign

Today, the peaceful little town still draws traffic from ranchers and railway folk, but also from tourists trying to relive the olden days…like me.

The old Decatur Petrified Wood Gas Station with the Texas Cafe in the background
Sumoflam at the Petrified Wood Station

One of the really nostalgic points is the old Petrified Wood Gas Station as you come into town.  In 1927 a keen businessman named E.F. Boydston purchased a former feed lot in order to build a wooden shed and a gas station.   Boydston allowed people to stopover and camp there and eventually even built some cabins. As the highway was widened in the mid-1930s, Boydston added more cabins, a garage and other buildings and then made them sturdier by adding petrified wood as a facing on the buildings.    The entire complex was eventually named Texas Plaza.

Texas Plaza Neon Sign in Decatur, TX
No Gas
No Gas

He also built a one-room frame building next door in 1929 and called it the Texas Lunchroom.  In 1935 they renamed it the Texas Cafe and faced it with the same petrified wood to match the other buildings.  It is now called the Whistle Stop Cafe.

Whistle Stop Cafe in Decatur, Texas. Formerly the Texas Cafe
Texaco Gas Pumps at Petrified Wood Station
Here’s a sign you don’t see anymore in the U.S.
Another view of the Petrified Wood Station

Today the complex is a unique example of the early days of automobile tourism.  I recall the 1960s and going to gas stations similar to this.  I really enjoyed the nostalgia.  And Decatur has taken advantage of that as there are two other nostalgic gas stations in town.

Old Sinclair Station – Decatur, Texas
Old Gulf Station in Decatur, Texas
Old Gulf Pump – Decatur
Old Sinclair Pump in Decatur, TX

Have you seen my new book yet? “Less Beaten Paths of America: Quirky and Offbeat Roadside Attractions” is now available on Amazon!

The book is 130 pages of FULL COLOR whimsy and kitsch as I tell stories of my visits to these places all over the U.S. and Canada. Definitely was fun taking these back roads trips to quirkville and I am excited to share them with you in words and photos.

 

I hope you will be able to check out the book or even get it on Kindle. You can order the book here:

SEE NEW BOOK

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Traveling US Numbered Highways – Part I: An Overview and History

US 89 and US 2 meet up in northern Montana
US 89 and US 2 meet up in northern Montana

When I was young and living in Albuquerque, NM in the 1960s, there were not many Interstate Highways.  Most of the country still relied on the U.S. Numbered Highway System.

Even to this day I can recall our family drives along the iconic Route 66 out of Albuquerque to Gallup, NM and then, eventually, when we moved to Dallas in 1968 we took it all the way to Amarillo, TX.  Even at that young age I was already enamored by the maze of highways and the desire to see what lays along these long black roads with millions of white lines in the middle and endless telephone poles and wires along both sides.  I too remember the many billboards advertising Stuckey’s roadside stops, gas station or unique tourist attractions.

Albuquerque as I knew it in the 1960s (Really!!) Official caption: Traffic in the streets of Albuquerque, New Mexico after a heavy downpour. Original Publication: Colour Photography book. (Photo by Ernst Haas/Getty Images )
Albuquerque as I knew it in the 1960s (Really!!).  This was Central Avenue, which was part of Route 66.  Official caption: Traffic in the streets of Albuquerque, New Mexico after a heavy downpour. Original Publication: Color Photography book. (Photo by Ernst Haas/Getty Images )
Historic Route 66 in Illinois
Historic Route 66 in Illinois

Since those days I have had the opportunity to travel many of these wonderful highways that ribbon across this glorious country.  They highways have taken me through deserts, mountains, mosquito-infested lake areas, the high plains, through small towns and big cities.  As I near 60 years old the fascination with these highways continues and I drive them every chance I get!!

Map of Current US Highways By SPUI - Own work / Base map is http://www.nationalatlas.gov/printable/images/pdf/reference/genref.pdf, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=944944
Map of Current US Highways
By SPUI – Own work / Base map is http://www.nationalatlas.gov/printable/images/pdf/reference/genref.pdf, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=944944

The current system of United States Numbered Highways (also called U.S. Routes or U.S. Highways) is an integrated network of roads and highways numbered within a nationwide grid in the contiguous United States. The roadways have always been maintained by state or local governments since their initial designation in 1926.

Old Lincoln Highway sign - from the Federal Highway Administration website
Old Lincoln Highway sign – from the Federal Highway Administration website
Carl Fisher, creator of the numbered highway system and also the Indianapolis Speedway
Carl Fisher, creator of the numbered highway system and also the Indianapolis Speedway

According to an article entitled “From Names to Numbers: The Origins of the U.S. Numbered Highway System” by Richard F. Weingroff of the Federal Highway Administration, highway numbering didn’t get started until 1926.  Prior to that time there were just a couple of cross country roads, known as trails back then.  These would include the Lincoln Highway (a direct route from New York City to San Francisco) and the Victory Highway (New York City to San Francisco via Baltimore).  The idea of the Lincoln Highway came from the fertile mind of Carl Fisher, the man also responsible for the Indianapolis Motor Speedway and Miami Beach. With help from fellow industrialists Frank Seiberling and Henry Joy, an improved, hard-surfaced road was envisioned that would stretch almost 3400 miles from coast to coast, New York to San Francisco, over the shortest practical route.

Weingroff notes:

The trails were a product of the pioneer days of auto travel when government took little interest in interstate roads. Most long distance trips, even by the most avid advocate of the automobile, took place in the comfort of the Nation’s railroads. Although named trails can be traced to the 1890’s, the movement began in earnest in the early 1910’s, with the National Old Trails Road (Baltimore to Los Angeles) and the Lincoln Highway setting the pattern. Boosters selected a route over existing–often, just barely existing–roads, gave it a colorful name, formed an association to promote the trail, and collected dues from businesses and towns along the way. The associations published trail guides and newsletters, held annual conventions, and promoted the improvement and use of their route. The goals were to promote the road, the good roads cause, and economic opportunity for the cities and businesses along the way.

Lincoln Highway after numbering
Lincoln Highway after numbering

In March 1925, the American Association of State Highway Officials (AASHO) started planning the federal highway system. Major east-west routes would be numbered in multiples of ten, from U.S. 10 across the north to U.S. 90 across the south. The major north-south routes would end in 1 or 5, from U.S. 1 between Maine and Florida to U.S. 101 between Washington and California. The Lincoln Highway was then broken up into U.S. 1, U.S. 30, U.S. 530, U.S. 40 and U.S. 50 (see above). The Lincoln Highway Association was created in 1913 to promote the Lincoln Highway using private and corporate donations. The public responded favorably, and many other named roads across the country followed.

The Lincoln Highway Map from lincolnhighwayassoc.org
The Lincoln Highway Map from lincolnhighwayassoc.org

Today the Lincoln Highway Association maintains an informative and history-filled website (see it here) about the first real cross country highway.

US 212 East on Beartooth Highway
US 212 East on Beartooth Highway

As I mentioned, the numbering of highways began in earnest in 1925. Generally, north-to-south highways are odd-numbered, with lowest numbers in the east, the area of the founding thirteen states of the United States, and highest in the west. Similarly, east-to-west highways are typically even-numbered, with the lowest numbers in the north, where roads were first improved most intensively, and highest in the south. Major north–south routes have numbers ending in “1” while major east–west routes have numbers ending in “0”.  Expansion of the system continued until 1956, when the Interstate Highway System was formed. After construction was completed, many U.S. Routes were replaced by Interstate Highways for through traffic. Despite the Interstate system, U.S. Highways still form many important regional connections, and new routes are still being added.

Scenes from US 89
Scenes from US 89

Throughout my years of driving, I have been blessed to be able to traverse thousands of miles of these numbered US highways.  In some instances, I have covered the entirety of the routes (over a number of trips).  For instance, from the 1970s to as late as 2014, I covered the entire north/south path of US 89, from Canada to Mexico.  I have been on most of US 66, US 61, US 20 and many others.

Official Route 66 Roadside Attraction
Official Route 66 Roadside Attraction

Some of the US Highways traverse the entire length of the country east to west or north to south.   Some of the longest of these are listed below:

25px-US_20.svgUS Highway 20 from Boston, MA to Yellowstone NP to Newport, OR – 3,237 miles

US_6.svgUS Highway 6 from Provincetown, MA to Bishop, CA – 3,207 miles

25px-US_30.svgUS Highway 30 from Atlantic City, NJ to Astoria, OR

25px-US_50.svgUS Highway 50 from Ocean City, MD to Sacramento, CA – 3,011 miles

US_2.svgUS Highway 2 from Houlton, ME to Rouses Point, NY and then starts again at St. Ignace, MI and goes all the way to Everett, WA – 2,572 miles (combined)

US_1.svgUS Highway 1 from Fort Kent, ME on the border with Canada to Key West, FL – 2,377 miles

31px-US_101.svgUS Highway 101 from Olympia, WA to Los Angeles, CA – 1,519 miles

25px-US_66.svgUS Highway 66 – the famed Route 66 – from Chicago, IL to Santa Monica, CA – 2,451 miles (though much has been replaced by I-10, I-15, I-40, I-44 and I-55)

US_61.svgUS Highway 61 – the Great River Road along the Mississippi River and then the Blues Highway in Mississippi – from Wyoming, MN to New Orleans, LA – 1,400 miles

25px-US_89.svgUS Highway 89 – goes along many of the US National Parks including Glacier NP, Yellowstone NP, Bryce Canyon NP, Zion NP and the Grand Canyon – from just north of Babb, MT on the Canadian border to Flagstaff, AZ.  Continues 89A south through Sedona and then onto Nogales (according to the US 89 Society website) – officially 1,247 miles, but the US 89 Society shows it as 1,800 miles)

DSC_5062Currently there are numbered highways from US 1 all the way to US 830 and a couple hundred in between. I have not been on a good number of these, but many of the cross country ones have felt the wheels of my cars and my footprints.  I have been on US 1 along many parts of the Atlantic Coast and have traveled much of US 101 on the Pacific Coast.  I have traveled the length of US 89 and have been on most of US 2 from Michigan to Montana.

DSC_7579Over the course of my next few posts, I will address my travels on the US Numbered Highways and note some of the wonderful places that can be seen along these routes.

US Highways 71 and 59 in Arkansas
US Highways 71 and 59 in Arkansas

 

 

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Missing the Open Highways: A Look Back at Some Back Roads of America

The start of US Route 2 heading west out of Ironwood, MI
The start of US Route 2 heading west out of Ironwood, MI

It is nearing the end of June 2015.  About a year ago at this time I was rolling down US Highway 61, better known as the Blues Highway, in Mississippi.  I was on my way to Galveston for a family reunion and then would make my way back home to Kentucky via Houston, Austin, Fort Worth and then thru Oklahoma, Missouri and Illinois.  I love the freedom of the road and sitting home in Lexington, KY is not what I wish I were doing.  Following is a pictorial of what I am missing and longing for on this hot, humid Kentucky day.

These are photos of the highways…the well beaten, but sometimes less beaten paths of our spacious and beautiful expanse we call America.  I don’t even recall where some of these were taken, nor when, but they represent this wonderful country.  I will return to these long solitary highways again someday soon.  But, for now, I can only dream about them and look back….  Enjoy the Ride!

Algonquin National Park in Ontario, Canada
A mountain highway in Central Oregon
Bluegrass Parkway in Central Kentucky, near Bardstown
DSC_4886
Heading towards the Grand Tetons in Wyoming
South on I-15 into Idaho
South on I-15 into Idaho
I-15 South of Divide/Wisdom, MT
I-15 South of Divide/Wisdom, MT
DSC_4576
Snowy road in the Rocky Mountains of Montana
I-94 west of Bismarck, ND
I-94 west of Bismarck, ND
Stretch of highway 200 heading from Jordan to Mosby Rest Area
Stretch of Hwy 200 heading from Jordan to Mosby Rest Area in Montana
Harmons Lick Road - Crab Orchard, KY
Harmons Lick Road – Crab Orchard, KY
Approaching Wolverine Creek Wind Farm, near Iona, ID
Approaching Wolverine Creek Wind Farm, near Iona, ID
Snowy Scenes along highway 32
Snowy Scenes along highway 32 in Idaho
Back road to What Cheer, IA.... a six mile long dirt road
Back road to What Cheer, IA…. a six mile long dirt road
Scene from ND Hwy 22
Scene from ND Hwy 22
A typical Hi-Line scene
A typical Hi-Line scene on US Route 2 in northern Montana
The "Main Drag" in Havre. US Hwy 2 runs right through the middle of town.
The “Main Drag” in Havre. US Hwy 2 runs right through the middle of town.
Gravel Road - Yoleta Trail Rd. east of Craig, CO
Gravel Road – Yoleta Trail Rd. east of Craig, CO

Colorado Hwy 13I-80 near Green River, Wyoming

I-80 near Green River, Wyoming

US 30 east of Diamondville
US 30 east of Diamondville
US 30 heading east to Kemmerer, WY
US 30 heading east to Kemmerer, WY
US 30 east of Montpelier
US 30 east of Montpelier, ID
Grandview Canyon on US 93 - northern section of the Peaks to Craters Scenic Byway
Grandview Canyon on US 93 in Idaho – northern section of the Peaks to Craters Scenic Byway
US 20 heading to Idaho 75 and Carey, ID
US 20 heading to Idaho 75 and Carey, ID

DSC_8580Heading West towards Wyoming on I-90

Heading West towards Wyoming on I-90

Long gravel roadSD 63 going though prairie grasslands and badlands

SD 63 going though prairie grasslands and badlands in central South Dakota

Heading west on US 18 out of Winner, South Dakota
Heading west on US 18 out of Winner, South Dakota
The road goes on forever - US 18 in southern South Dakota
The road goes on forever – US 18 in southern South Dakota
A typical road in Oxford County
A typical road in Oxford County, Ontario
Bluegrass Parkway near Bardstown, Kentucky
Bluegrass Parkway near Bardstown, Kentucky
US Route 60 west of Mountain Home, Missouri
US Route 60 west of Mountain Home, Missouri
US 87/287 heading south into Amarillo, Texas
US 87/287 heading south into Amarillo, Texas
US 87/287 South near Masterson, Texas
US 87/287 South near Masterson, Texas
I-25 East towards Trinidad, Colorado
I-25 East towards Trinidad, Colorado
CO Hwy 69 south towards the Wet Mountains
CO Hwy 69 south towards the Wet Mountains in Colorado

Mt. Massive in ColoradoA road near Lexington KY with the shadows of the famed plank fences

A road near Lexington KY with the shadows of the famed plank fences

cropped-Eureka-Springs-AR.jpg
Eureka Springs, Arkansas back road

DSC_1476 DSC_1450 DSC_1360DSC_1747

Land of the Lakes in southern Kentucky

Bridge over Mississippi River at Cairo, IL

Bridge over Mississippi River at Cairo, IL

Shaded hills on US Route 2 as the sun lowered in the sky east of Wolf Point, MT
Shaded hills on US Route 2 as the sun lowered in the sky east of Wolf Point, MT
Driving south of ND Hwy 3 heading towards Rugby, ND
Driving south of ND Hwy 3 heading towards Rugby, ND

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