Road Trip to Idaho – Day 4: Shelby, MT to Rexburg, ID

Cabin in the Snow
Cabin in the Snow

March 25, 2013: After a fabulous couple of days in Shelby, MT with my daughter, her husband and all the kids, it was back on the road for the last leg of the trip to Rexburg.  This was basically a straight shot down I-15 thru Great Falls, Helena and Butte.   Unfortunately, the day started off pretty snowy and yucky.

Gas Station in Shelby, MT
Gas Station in Shelby, MT
Interstate 15 heading South towards Great Falls
Interstate 15 heading South towards Great Falls

By the time I had hit the Great Falls area, the weather was basically clearing up and so it was more or less smooth sailing to Helena.  I was provided an excellent view of Tower Rock State Park.

South on I-15 towards Tower Rock State Park
South on I-15 towards Tower Rock State Park

Tower Rock State Park is a 400-foot high igneous rock formation that lies along a stretch of the Missouri River north of Helena.  The river has formed a deep gorge into the rock. Tower Rock was noted in the Lewis and Clark Journals. Meriwether Lewis wrote in his journal on July 16, 1805: ‘At this place there is a large rock of 400 feet high wich stands immediately in the gap which the Missouri makes on it’s passage from the mountains… This rock I called the tower. It may be ascended with some difficulty nearly to its summit and from it there is a most pleasing view of the country we are now about to leave. From it I saw that evening immense herds of buffaloe in the plains below.’

Tower Rock State Park
Tower Rock State Park
Missouri River in Tower Rock State Park
Missouri River in Tower Rock State Park
Fishing on the Missouri
Fishing on the Missouri
Hardy Bridge in Tower Rock State Park
Hardy Bridge in Tower Rock State Park

I took Exit 244 for Hardy Creek on got on to Old US Highway 91 and followed it along the Missouri River.  This took me into the canyon area.  I then crossed over the Hardy Bridge and continued along the river.  Apparently, the silver steel bridge was the scene of the shootout between federal agents and rum-runners in the 1987 movie The Untouchables.

Along the Missouri River in the park - probably still how it may have looked for Lewis and Clark.
Along the Missouri River in the park – probably still how it may have looked for Lewis and Clark. This photo was taken with the iPhone Panorama function, thus the little shift on the left

Back on the freeway I moved a little further up the road to the Dearborn Rest Area in the Adel Mountains, a large stretch of volcanic remnants.  The volcanic remnants run about 40 miles in length and 20 miles wide, and the area of Tower Rock State Park is part of this old volcanic flow.

Adel Mountain Rest Area
Adel Volcanic Mountains as seen from Dearborn  Rest Area north of Helena

From the rest area I continued south to Exit 234 which brought me into Craig, MT. From what I could tell, Craig is all about fishing on the Missouri River and the other tributary creeks.  This section of the Missouri is apparently one of the premier trout fishing areas in the country.  As for the small town, it was named for local pioneer Warren Craig. In 1886 Craig built a log house, with a stone fireplace. Many times he had to defend his homestead from the Indians.  The house is located half mile from the Great Northern depot, but I was not able to get over it due to time constraints. In 1890 his son, John Craig settled in the area and Mrs. John Craig later served as postmaster.

Old Row Boat in Craig, MT
Old Row Boat in Craig, MT
Craig Train Stop
Craig Train Stop
Bridge over Missouri at Craig
Sign for Bridge over Missouri at Craig – Forrest H. Anderson Memorial Bridge

Ironically, my hope was a convenience store, but all that I could find were fishing related shops like the one below.

Headhunter Flies & Guides - Craig, MT
Headhunter Flies & Guides – Craig, MT
Geese hang around the Missouri River in Craig
Geese hang around the Missouri River in Craig

From Craig I got back on I-15 to continue south towards Helena.  I took exit 209 to see the “Gates of the Mountains.” Named by Meriwether Lewis on July 19, 1805 because of the 1200 foot tall towering limestone cliffs that seemed to block their way. He wrote, “this evening we entered much the most remarkable clifts that we have yet seen. these clifts rise from the waters edge on either side perpendicularly to the hight of 1200 feet. … the river appears to have forced its way through this immense body of solid rock for the distance of 5-3/4 Miles … I called it the gates of the rocky mountains.” Since that time the area has become a National Wilderness area by an act of Congress in 1964.

Gates of the Mountains Info Sign at Turnoff
Gates of the Mountains Info Sign at Turnoff

At this visitor turnoff there are not only the signs, but there is a metal sculpture of a man and a dog that greeted me.  Behind them was a spectacular view of the area.

Man and Dog at Gates of the Mountains view point
Man and Dog at Gates of the Mountains view point

I am not sure (and have done a lot of looking!!) to see who made this sculpture.  There is no information that I am aware of.  Another view of it shows the Gates of the Mountains in the background.

Man and Dog with Gates of the Mountains
Man and Dog with Gates of the Mountains

I did drive a bit down the road to get closer, but it is quite a drive down there.  The lake is Upper Holter Lake.

Gates of the Mountains near Helena, MT
Gates of the Mountains near Helena, MT

After this amazing scene (which the photo does no justice to), I continued south towards Helena.

I-15 South towards Helena
I-15 South towards Helena

I decided to go through Helena and then through Montana City and then on to Butte.  I decided to stop at the Butte Berkeley Pit overlook for my next stop.

Berkeley Pit - Butte, MT
Berkeley Pit – Butte, MT

The Berkeley Pit is a former open pit copper mine in Butte. It is one mile long by half a mile wide with an approximate depth of 1,780 feet. The mine was opened in 1955 and operated by Anaconda Copper and later by the Atlantic Richfield Company (ARCO), until its closure in 1982.

Berkeley Pit as seen from Downtown Butte
Berkeley Pit as seen from Downtown Butte

The viewpoint offers a couple of great sights.  First there is a spectacular view of the Anaconda Mountain range (also known as the Pintlars) east of Butte, which has a number of 10,000 foot tall peaks.  And, also from the overview point, to the west, you can see the 90 foot tall “Our Lady of the Rockies” statue 3500 feet above the view point (actual elevation is 8510 feet) .

Anaconda Range - east of Butte
Anaconda Range – east of Butte (tallest peaks include West Goat Peak, Mt. Evans, Mt. Haggin, Warren Peak and East Goat Peak – all over 10,000 feet tall)

The “Our Lady of the Rockies” statue was placed on the East Ridge on the Continental Divide overlooking Butte.  It is apparently the second tallest statue in the United States after the Statue of Liberty (see list of tallest statues on Wikipedia). The statue was built by volunteers using donated materials to honor women everywhere, especially mothers. The design for the statue was engineered by Laurien Eugene Riehl. He was a retired engineer for the Anaconda Company who donated his engineering skills to the project, specifically the statue would need to handle the intense winds at the top of the peak. A full photo of this huge beautiful statue is available here.

Our Lady of the Rockies statue as seen from the Butte Overlook
Our Lady of the Rockies statue as seen from the Butte Overlook
Our Lady of the Rockies info sign at Butte Overlook
Our Lady of the Rockies info sign at Butte Overlook

From the overlook I took a drive into Butte for fuel and a drive through town.  Here are a few sights of Butte:

Butte, Montana Welcoms sign
Butte, Montana Welcome sign
Mural on side of a building
Mural on side of a building
Old Building Advertisement, Butte, MT
Old Building Advertisement, Butte, MT
Acoma Restaurant Sign
Acoma Restaurant Sign
Lincoln Hotel Advertisement
Lincoln Hotel Advertisement
Colorful and Unique Architecture
Colorful and Unique Architecture

After the nice drive around Butte, it was back on I-15 heading south.  I was humored when I approached Exit 111 south of Butte.  The sign said Feely.  So, I took the exit just to get the sign…   Now I know how to get to Feely.  I just need to find Touchy next!!

Feely, MT sign
Feely, Montana sign

Not much further down the road was yet another interesting sign:

Divide Wisdom, MT
Divide Wisdom, MT

What I am wondering is if I need to really divide wisdom?  Can’t I keep the complete wisdom?  Actually, I would have liked to have made it to Wisdom.  I have been to Wisdom, KY.  I need more Wisdom!!

I-15 South of Divide/Wisdom, MT
I-15 South of Divide/Wisdom, MT
Union Pacific Bridge over the Big Hole River near Glen, MT
Union Pacific Bridge over the Big Hole River near Glen, MT

I continued south towards Idaho.  Though I was not able to get any photos, I passed by a HUGE Buffalo Ranch near Dillon.  I must have seen 200-300 head from the freeway.  Continuing south I passed the huge Clark Canyon Reservoir, with water frozen.

Clark Reservoir in Southern Montana
Clark Canyon Reservoir in Southern Montana

 

South on I-15 into Idaho
South on I-15 near Lima, MT

From Lima I soon entered into Idaho.  I ventured south into Spencer, Idaho, which is the home of the Opal Mountain Mine and is known as the Opal Capital of America.

Spencer, Idaho sign
Spencer, Idaho sign

Opals were apparently discovered in the Spencer area in 1948 and there is one big mine in operation.  there are a number of shops.  As it was a snowy Sunday, nothing was opened, but it was a unique little drive right off of the freeway.

High Country Opal - Spencer, ID
High Country Opal – Spencer, ID

 

Spencer Opal Mines
Spencer Opal Mines

 

Cabin in the Snow
Cabin in the Snow – near Spencer, ID

From Spencer I continued south and finally got to Exit 143 and headed east towards Rexburg, where I will be for the next couple of weeks.

East to Rexburg - notice big white temple n the middle of town
East to Rexburg – notice the big white LDS Temple in the middle of town and Tetons in the distance

Finally…hotel sweet hotel.  I am at the beautiful AmericInn Hotel.  My room even has a jacuzzi in it!!

AmericInn Rexburg Jacuzzi
AmericInn Rexburg Jacuzzi
Time for Bed - AmericInn, Rexburg
Time for Bed – AmericInn, Rexburg

(925)

Road Trip to Idaho – Day 3: Miles City, MT to Shelby, MT

Antelope on the Run
Antelope on the Run

Day 3 – March 10, 2013: A beautiful morning in Miles City, Montana.  A cool 45 degrees and bright sunny skies.  Should be a wonderful day to drive to Shelby, about 6 or 7 hours away. Following is the path I took to Shelby from Miles City:


Miles City to Shelby, Montana

Welcome to Miles City
Welcome to Miles City

Miles City is a town of about 8500 people in Custer County in the far southeast of Montana. The town was founded in 1877 by settlers who had been evicted by General Nelson A. Miles from the Tongue River Cantonment for selling alcohol to the soldiers.  It is a typical Western town and actually similar to some Texas towns I have been to.

Buffalo Statue
Buffalo Statue near my hotel in Miles City
Indian Chief and Horse statue above a hair stylist shop in Miles City
Indian Chief and Horse statue above a hair stylist shop in Miles City

I took State Hwy 59 north out of Miles City towards Jordan.  This took me through high prairies in lands dotted by cattle ranches, old cabins and grazing antelope.

Montana State Highway 59 heading north
Montana State Highway 59 heading north
Pronghorn Antelope off if Hwy 59
Pronghorn Antelope off of Hwy 59 (also see photo at top)
Old Cabin in the Plains as seen on Hwy 59
Old Cabin in the Plains as seen on Hwy 59
Landscape approaching Jordan
Landscape approaching Jordan, MT

Just before getting into Jordan, I made my way through the small town of Cohagen, an unincorporated sheep farming town.  I was enthralled by the bar which also had a pretty old Squirt sign on it.

Cohagen Bar, Cohagen, MT
Cohagen Bar, Cohagen, MT

I also saw another old cabin, something I really enjoy finding on the road.

Old cabin in Cohagen
Old cabin in Cohagen
Striped field as seen north of Cohagen
Striped field as seen north of Cohagen

From Cohagen I went through Jordan and then headed west on Hwy 200 towards Lewistown. About halfway there I came to the Mosby Rest Area, a real nice rest area by the way.  This rest area had a few historical markers and sits in a fairly scenic area.

Stretch of highway 200 heading from Jordan to Mosby Rest Area
Stretch of highway 200 heading from Jordan to Mosby Rest Area
Bearpaw Shale Historical Marker at Mosby Rest Area
Bearpaw Shale Historical Marker at Mosby Rest Area
Kerchival City Historical Marker at Mosby Rest Area
Kerchival City Historical Marker at Mosby Rest Area
Fort Musselshell Historical Marker
Fort Musselshell Historical Marker

Just up the road I crossed over the Musselshell River in an area where it is drying up.

Mussellshell River near Mosby Rest area
Mussellshell River near Mosby Rest area

Not too far west of the river crossing, I came to the town of Winnett.  Usually I would pass right by, but their welcome sign caught my eye so I had to meander into this town, which is also the county seat of Petroleum County.

Winnett, MT Welcome Sign
Winnett, MT Welcome Sign – Go Ahead and Blink

The small town of about maybe 200 people really does have some character.  There is a small hotel, a little cafe (which I wish I would have tried out) and a couple of bars.  There are some old signs, some nice old buildings and a great view of the butte behind the town.

Old Grain Elevator - Winnett, MT
Old Grain Elevator – Winnett, MT
Old Store Front - Winnett, MT
Old Store Front – Winnett, MT
Old Hotel Sign - Winnett, MT
Old Hotel Sign – Winnett, MT
Old Cabin, Winnett, MT
Old Cabin, Winnett, MT
Another Winnett Sign - on other side of town
Another Winnett Sign – on other side of town

Continuing west another 25 miles or so on Montana 200 , I came across another small town called Grass Range.  Like Winnett, the town of about 100 people seemed to have some character, so I dropped in there as well, and I am glad I did.  I think I was happiest about the old wooden grain elevator.  What a taste of old western Americana.

Welcome to Grass Range, MT
Welcome to Grass Range, MT
Old Wooden Grain Elevator - Grass Range, MT
Old Wooden Grain Elevator – Grass Range, MT
Old Grass Range Depot and Elevator
Old Grass Range Depot and Elevator

The wooden grain elevator used to serve the old Old Milwaukee Road Railroad which ran from Milwaukee thru Montana and on to Seattle, WA. The electrified railroad was built around 1917, and eventually, the Montana portion was abandoned around March 1980, thus giving it “fallen flag” status. There are still remnants of this railroad, including the depot and grain elevator in Grass Range.  There has even been a book written about the Montana portion of this unique railroad called Guide to the Milwaukee Road in Montana by Steve McCarter. The book takes you on a trip along the Milwaukee Road railroad across Montana, from the North Dakota border to St. Paul Pass in Idaho.  There is also a unique video about it on YouTube.

Mountains near Lewistown
Mountains near Lewistown

From the high plains I continued north into the foothills of the geographic center of Montana, better known as Lewistown, the county seat of Fergus County. The town has a unique quality to it…on the edge of the wilderness yet still a population center.  In fact, just about a mile before coming into town I saw a bald eagle sitting in a field. I couldn’t believe my eyes.  It was the first bald eagle I had ever seen in the wild.  And, in the field next to it I saw a second one take off in flight.

Bald Eagle in field east of Lewistown
Bald Eagle in field east of Lewistown

I also saw deer on a hill right in town.

Deer in Lewistown
Deer on a hill in Lewistown

One of the first things you see in town is the visitor’s center, which also has a rocket ship and a replica Statue of Liberty in the park next to it.

Lewistown Rocket Ship
Lewistown Rocket Ship
Golden Statue of Liberty in Lewistown
Golden Statue of Liberty in Lewistown

I would have to say that the most stunning piece of the town was the Fergus County Courthouse.  It reminded me of some of the courthouses I have seen in Texas.

Fergus County Courthouse, Lewistown, Montana
Fergus County Courthouse, Lewistown, Montana

Built in 1907 from a design by Newton C. Gauntt.  Gauntt used brick from Hebron, North Dakota to build it. Truly a spectacular old courthouse!!

Old Barn west of Lewistown
Old Barn west of Lewistown

After Lewistown I headed west towards Belt and then up through Great Falls and then into Shelby.

Approaching Belt, Montana from the east
Approaching Belt, Montana from the east

 

Big John Statue - Great Falls, MT
Big John Statue – Great Falls, MT

But, the best part of getting up to Shelby?  Grandkidz!!

Grandkidz 1
Grandkidz 2
GK1
Grandkidz 1

Another great day of travel!!

(826)

Road Trip to Idaho – Day 2: Savage, MN to Miles City, MT

Rural Scene on Enchanted Highway, South of Gladstone, ND
Rural Scene on Enchanted Highway, South of Gladstone, ND

I embarked on Day 2 of my trip to Idaho – left Savage, MN in the midst of snow and fog.  The roads were scary heading northwest to Fargo, ND.

Snowy highways in Minnesota
Snowy highways in Minnesota

Today (March 9, 2013) was the second leg of my trip to Idaho.  Today I drove from Savage, MN to Miles City, MT.  I drove 781 miles over a 14 hour stretch.  Following is the map of the trip.


View Larger Map

My first stop along the way was for gas.  I stopped in Avon, MN…..which, I discovered, is also the home of the Lake Wobegon Trail.  The trail is 46 miles long and 10 feet wide.  It opened in 1998.  Avon is the home of the Lake Wobegon Trails Association.  Garrison Keillor, the creator of Lake Wobegon and the Prairie Home Companion show, lived in Avon at one time.

Avon, Minnesota
Avon, Minnesota
Lake Wobegon Trail
Lake Wobegon Trail
Wobegon Park, Avon, MN
Wobegon Park, Avon, MN
Wall Mural on laundromat in Avon, MN
Wall Mural on laundromat in Avon, MN
Wall Mural in Avon, MN
Wall Mural in Avon, MN

From Avon I proceeded north to Ashby, MN.  This is home to a large metal Coot statue, which is what I was looking for.  But, as I often discover, the town is also a quaint little place.

Ashby, Minnesota
Ashby, Minnesota
Coot Statue, Ashby, MN
Coot Statue, Ashby, MN

The coot statue stand outsides of town on Highway 78 and represents the largest Ashby area sportsmen club, Coots Unlimited (a parody of Ducks Unlimited).  There is more about it here.

Man walking road in Ashby, MN
Man walking road in Ashby, MN
Mural in Ashby, MN
Mural in Ashby, MN
Ashby, MN Water Tower in the fog
Ashby, MN Water Tower in the fog

From Ashby I proceeded north to Fergus Falls, MN.  The roads were a little better and my GPS had me taking a back road.  I was headed first to the Continental Divide Marker and site, which was built in 2000.

Continental Divide Plaque - Fergus Falls, MN
Continental Divide Plaque – Fergus Falls, MN
Downtown Fergus Falls
Downtown Fergus Falls

From Fergus Falls I continued heading northwest on I-94.  The roads were still icy, but had cleared up somewhat.  I then took a quick swing off at Exit 38 (Rothsay) to get a photo of the 14 foot tall, 9200 pound cement prairie chicken statue.  I have been here before (as well as a good part of the drive thru North Dakota – see my posts from 2005) .  This time I was able to get a more unique view of the giant bird.

Greater Prairie Chicken Statue - Rothsay, MN
Greater Prairie Chicken Statue – Rothsay, MN

I then got back on the freeway and fought more fog.  But the fog and snow make for interesting views that one would not see on a clear day.  Many trees took on shadowy shapes.

Tree in fog - northwest Minnesota as seen from I-94
Tree in fog – northwest Minnesota as seen from I-94

Along the road I found a road sign that provided the perfect description of this day’s trip had been to this point – Downer, MN (exit 15 heading north)

Downer, MN - Great description of the day
Downer, MN – Great description of the day

Ironically, shortly after Downer, things cleared up again, just in time for my entrance into the border town of Moorhead, MN. Moorhead has a Norwegian population and is home to the Hjemkomst Center, which houses a replica Viking ship and the beautiful is the Stave Church, a symbol of the Norwegian heritage in the Red River Valley. Built by Guy Paulson, the church is a full-scale replica of the Hopperstad Church in Vik, Norway. Norwegian Stave churches were built just after the close of the Viking Age in Scandinavia in the 1100 and 1200’s. The technique of using vertical posts-or staves- had been modified over time to become wooden architectural works of art.

Stave Church Replica - Moorhead, MN
Stave Church Replica – Moorhead, MN
Snowy Road in Moorhead
Snowy Road in Moorhead

From Moorhead I entered Fargo, ND and continued heading west on I-94. I passed thru Fargo so I could get to other sights along the road (and to also get out of the miserable snow!!) My first stop in North Dakota was Jamestown. Jamestown is known as the “Buffalo City” and one can find all kinds of Buffalo things, including “the World’s Largest Buffalo” statue the National Buffalo Museum.

Frontier Village - Jamestown, ND
Frontier Village – Jamestown, ND
Chuckwagon Cafe - Jamestown, ND
Chuckwagon Cafe – Jamestown, ND  They offer a      4 Meat Buffet what ever that is
World's Largest Buffalo - Jamestown, ND
World’s Largest Buffalo – Jamestown, ND

The “World’s Largest Buffalo” is a in Frontier Village. It was commissioned in 1959 by local businessman Harold Newman, and built by art students from Jamestown College, under the supervision of art instructor and designer, Elmer Peterson. It is visible from Interstate 94, overlooking the city from above the James River valley. The statue is 26 feet tall, 46 feet long and weighs 60 tons. It was constructed with stucco and cement around a steel beam frame shaped with wire mesh.

World's Largest Sand Hill Crane - Steele, ND
“Sandy” – The World’s Largest Sand Hill Crane – Steele, ND

Further west on I-94 is the small town of Steele, ND. There are about 800 people and one silver Big Bird! “Sandy”, as she is known, is a 40 foot tall 4.5 ton bird.  It was constructed of rolled sheet metal welded onto a steel inner frame, which was built in three different sections.  It was created in 1999 by James Miller, a resident of Arena, ND.  The crane was built to bring attention to the fact that the Steele area is one of the best birding destinations in North America. Sandhill Cranes are some of the migratory species that nest here.

Silo Family as seen from I-94 near Steele, ND
Silo Family as seen from I-94 near Steele, ND

I loved the shot above.  Tons of fun…

I finally made it to Bismarck, ND where I had a couple more interesting stops.  Bismarck borders the Missouri River and there are a number of parks along river road.  One is Keelboat Park.  There is a large four headed thunderbird statue at the park and it is uber impressive. The sculpture represents a powerful American Indian spirit that depicts thunderstorms.

Thunderbird Statue - Keelboat Park, Bismarck, ND
Thunderbird Statue – Keelboat Park, Bismarck, ND
Sumoflam and Thunderbirds
Sumoflam and the Thunderbirds
Lewis and Clark Sculpture - Keelboat Park
Lewis and Clark Sculpture – Keelboat Park
Grant Marsh Bridge over Missouri River in Bismarck
Missouri River High Bridge over Missouri River in Bismarck

In Pioneer Park along the Missouri River, there is a fairly new sculpture called “Rising Eagle”, which was made by art students from the United Tribes Technical College.  Dedicated in 2007, it was vandalized in 2010 and had to be rebuilt.

Rising Eagle Sculpture in Pioneer Park, Bismarck, ND
Rising Eagle Sculpture in Pioneer Park, Bismarck, ND
Rising Eagle Sculpture from the Front
Rising Eagle Sculpture from the Front

As I continued west of Bismarck on I-94, the weather was finally cleared up and there were sunny skies.  The views looked great.

I-94 west of Bismarck, ND
I-94 west of Bismarck, ND

A couple of miles before Exit 72 (about 20 miles east of Dickinson, ND) I could begin seeing the following HUGE sculpture by local artist Gary Greff (from Regent, ND).  Greff began his projects in 1989 and continues work today through donations from local people and many others. Named “Geese in Flight,” it is the gateway to the famous “Enchanted Highway” and is listed by the Guinness Book of World Records as the “World’s Largest Scrap Metal Sculpture.”

Gate to Enchanted Highway - Flying Geese
Gate to Enchanted Highway – “Geese in Flight” – created in 2001

Built in 2001, “Geese in Flight” is 154 feet long and 110 feet tall and weighs over 78.8 tons.  The largest flying goose has a wingspan of 30 feet. Gary Greff used oil tanks and oil well pipe to make it.  I kind of envision the big “eye” in the middle as looking over the Enchanted Highway.

Flying Geese from Satellite (as pulled from Google Maps)
Flying Geese from Satellite (as pulled from Google Maps)

The Enchanted is a 32 mile stretch of road beginning at Exit 72 on I-94 and then going south through Gladstone and then all the way to Regent, ND.  Along the way there are a number of sculptures.  Greff even made dozens of small geese that line the nice dirt road up to the Flying Geese sculpture.

Geese along road
Geese along road

From the Flying Geese, I did go south through Gladstone and then on for another 10 miles.

Grain Elevator
Grain Elevator – Gladstone

Then about three miles down the road, is “Deer Crossing,” the second of the huge sculptures down the road.  The buck is 60 feet long and 75 feet tall.  The doe is 50 feet tall and 50 feet long.  These were erected in 2002.

"Deer Crossing" on Enchanted Highway
“Deer Crossing” on Enchanted Highway
Deer Crossing from satellite
Deer Crossing from satellite
Flying Geese as seen from Deer Crossing
Flying Geese as seen from Deer Crossing

I continued south in hopes of seeing more and made it ten miles to the “almost” ghost town of Lefor.  The prairie scenery was great.

Rural Scene on Enchanted Highway, South of Gladstone, ND
Rural Scene on Enchanted Highway, South of Gladstone, ND
More scenery on the Enchanted Highway
More scenery on the Enchanted Highway

I made it to Lefor and gave up as I had more traveling to do to get to Miles City, Montana for the night.

Remnants of old bank in Lefor
Remnants of old bank in Lefor

There are a number of other giant sculptures along the road south of Lefor, including a 60 foot grasshopper, pheasants on the prairie (including a 60 foot long pheasant), a 51 foot tall Teddy Roosevelt and a “Fisherman’s Dream”, which was completed in 2007 and includes a metal fish leaping up 70 feet through a metal pond surface.  Someday I hope to get back there to see all of these.  At the end of the road Greff has built an Enchanted Castle Hotel for the final enchanting stop.

I returned back through Gladstone and took a quick spin through the town and caught one final small statue:

Small Metal Sculpture in Gladstone
Small Metal Sculpture in Gladstone

I made way to Dickinson and then on to the border of North Dakota and Montana.

Sunset in North Dakota
Sunset in North Dakota

I was surprised to see that there was even a Beach in North Dakota!!

Welcome to Beach, ND
Welcome to Beach, ND
Beach, ND
Beach, ND

After a long day I made it to the hotel in Miles City, Montana.  Hotel sweet hotel…..

 

(960)