I is for Ingenuity – #atozchallenge

I am always intrigued about the ingenuity of humans. Their ability to build and create things that solves problems for them.

There are many examples of ingenuity to can be seen on the back roads of America. Whether it be bridges or towers or buildings. There is always something unique and interesting to see.

Tuckhannock Viaduct – Nicholson, Pennsylvania
Nicholson’s welcome sign features the Viaduct

One of my brightest memories of fascination comes from a town in eastern Pennsylvania called Nicholson. In this town, the train company needed a solution to get the train up high to pass by as the town was down in the valley. So, a giant viaduct was built. Called the Tunkhannock Creek Viaduct, this giant structure. towered over the town and allowed the trains to pass by way up on top of the town nestled below in the valley. To realize that this was built in 1915 is amazing to me. It is 2375 feet long, 240 feet tall and 34 feet wide. Yes, 24 stories tall!!!!! The bridge was built as

The viaduct is dizzying when looking up from below

part of the Clark’s Summit-Hallstead Cutoff, which was part of a project of the Lackawanna Railroad to revamp a winding and hilly system. This rerouting was built between Scranton, Pennsylvania and Binghamton, New York. All thirteen piers were excavated to bedrock, which was up to 138 feet below ground level. Almost half of the bulk of the bridge is underground. The bridge was built by the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad and was designed by Abraham Burton Cohen. Construction on the bridge began in May 1912, and dedication took place on November 6, 1915.

Tuckhannock Viaduct towers over the small town of Nicholson, PA
Cleveland’s tallest buildings

One needs only go to some of the older big cities such as New York, Chicago, Pittsburgh, Cleveland or Cincinnati, to see the tall buildings that were built in the 1930s and 40s. Naturally, these were to accommodate offices are in a crowded area. The building designs were amazing and are still beautiful to look at.

I really love the older buildings as they were obviously much more difficult to build and their architecture is so reminiscent of the times. I guess I grew up watching the old Superman movies and saw the old buildings used in these.

New York City 1959 (from an old family picture – I was actually there when this was taken.  Only 3 years old)
New York City, 2013 – taken from Hoboken, NJ
Cincinnati Skyline with its old buildings and numerous bridges
The Ascent at Roebling’s in Covington, KY across the river from Cincinnati

But not all of the buildings are old. There is a unique condominium structure that was built in Covington, which is a suburb of Cincinnati across the Ohio River into Kentucky. The structure is unique in its architecture.  And the amazing PPG Building in Pittsburgh really blows my mind…a true glass castle!

 

A view from below One PPG Place
Bridge over Mississippi River at Cairo, IL

I have also grown a fascination with bridges. These are massive structures that cross rivers great and small. In Cairo, Illinois there are two massive and Long Bridges. Cairo is where the confluence of the Ohio River flows into the Mississippi River. The Ohio River is at its deepest and widest point here and when going south through this area one must cross a bridge over the Ohio and then over the Mississippi. These bridges are amazing and it stuns me that the traffic and the years have not worn these bridges away.

The New River Bridge in West Virginia is THREE Statues of Liberty high above the river.  An amazing feat of engineering.

River Crossing near Cairo, IL
A view of the Detroit-Superior Bridge in Cleveland
High Level Bridge in Lethbridge, Alberta was built in 1909. It is 5327 feet long and the largest of its type in the world
Roberto Clemente Bridge in Pittsburgh
Cut Bank Creek Trestle, built in 1900 in Cut Bank, Montana
Sunset over Tacoma Narrows bridge in Washington
Bridges of Pittsburgh
Some of the kids viewing the massive New River Gorge Bridge in West Virginia in August 1995
Green Bridge near Redcliff, Colorado

I once crossed over a bridge in a valley in the mountains of Colorado (see above). This bridge to was stunning to me is you come down off of the hill and see the bridge down below. I wondered out loud at the time how engineers could fulfill this feat.

Golden Gate Bridge in 2016

Another of the great and fascinating Bridges is the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco. Not only is it massive like the bridges in the east, it is also crossing over a giant bay and must also be earthquake proof.

Delaware Seashore Bridge
Veterans Memorial Bridge in Steubenville, OH

 

Some of the newer bridges are more unique and have their own kind of personality. The bridge crosses the bay in Delaware was stunning to me. I was fortunate enough to be at this bridge during sunset and cut the lovely photo of it above.

Many of the newer bridges have dozens of cables attached to large pillars.  They look futuristic and are cool to drive over.  I have seen quite of a few of these in recent years.

 

William H. Harsha Bridge from Maysville, KY into Ohio.
Rexburg, Idaho LDS Temple

Ingenuity is this not stop just at skyscrapers and bridges. There are many religious structures that can be seen across the country that are also amazing feats of engineering. Take for instance today LDS temple in Salt Lake City. The stones gathered to build that building came from the canyons and had to be hauled by horse drawn wagons.

Many of the other LDS temples are also spectacular.  But they are not the only religious buildings.

Old Church “San Xavier del Bac” in Tucson

The old church in Tucson, Arizona called San Xavier del Bac, was built in the 1700s and one can only wonder how the Spaniards built this beautiful and unique structure in the middle of the desert.

Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Galveston
Chapel of the Holy Cross in Sedona, AZ
St. Mary’s Basilica, Marietta, OH
Central Presbyterian in Cambridge, ON
Hoover Dam and Bridge (photo credit hdrinc.com)

I have crossed over the Hoover Dam in Nevada and the Glen Canyon Dam in Arizona numerous times. These are some of the largest dams in the United States and when you stand on the edge and look down it is dizzying. And to think that these damn’s were built in the 1940s and 1950s is amazing. The ingenuity of the engineers that designed and manage the construction of these is beyond words to me.

On the top of the world on Beartooth Highway that borders Wyoming and Montana south of Red Lodge, MT
Sumoflam at the Oak Creek Canyon Overlook in 1982. You can see hairpin turns at right

And finally, some of the highways themselves are stunning pizza engineering. Have I overused those words already? The Beartooth Highway in northern Wyoming and the highways that go across the Rocky Mountain National Park are a couple prime examples of this. Even the winding hairpin turns of Oak Creek Canyon Road from Flagstaff to Sedona are quite amazing.

Ingenuity from the 1880s — Longest Covered Bridge in Canada, West Montrose Covered Bridge, West Montrose, ON opened in 1881

Though I am more drawn to the unique and quirky things to see around the country and perhaps closer to the nature of birds and animals and trees and clouds, I am nevertheless grateful and overwhelmed by the ingenuity of humans in the spirit of design and innovation. What needs only open their eyes on the highway and think about some of the things that have been built whether they are bridges, buildings or even monuments to fallen heroes. There is always inspiration to be seen and felt from the ingenuity of the human spirit.

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Road Trip Home from Idaho – Day 1: Rexburg, ID to Shelby, MT

Gold Butte, Montana
Gold Butte in Northern Montana as seen from Frontier Bar near Shelby, Montana

Mar. 27, 2013: After almost two weeks in Rexburg working with my new employer DSN America, it was time to return back to Kentucky and home sweet home.  They had flown Julianne out to Idaho, so I was blessed to have my very best friend and sweetheart with me for the long drive home, with a brief stopover in Shelby, Montana to see our daughter and their kids.  It was an easy first day.


Rexburg, ID to Shelby, MT

We left Rexburg in the afternoon and eventually zipped up I-15.  We crossed over Monida Pass, which serve as the border between Idaho and Montana. The mountains were still snow covered and beautiful, especially as we came close to the Montana border.

Lima Peaks south of Lima, Montana
Garfield Mtn (R) and Lima Peaks just south of Lima, Montana

Lima, Montana is just a small dot on the map and there is not much there.  But, it is really a quite unique place.  There are barely 200 people living in the town at the base of the mountains.  Many of the buildings are really old.  In some respects, the town almost looks like it is a period movie set rather than a real town. The Red River runs nearby the small town.  Lima was originally called Allerdice until a train station for the Utah and Northern was built there.  It was changed to Spring Hill at that time.  It was eventually changed to Lima by Henry Thompson, who named it for his former home in Lima, Wisconsin.

Downtown Lima, Montana
Downtown Lima, Montana

We drove around the small town, much of which was dirt roads.  There is a woodworker that makes whirly-gigs, a couple of interesting buildings and a unique kitschy store front.

Down Moose Alley to the hand made wood toys place
Down Moose Alley to the hand made wood toys place
Wood Shop was closed when we got there.
Wood Shop was closed when we got there
Whirly-gigs
Whirly-gigs
Peat Bar and Hotel in Lima, Montana
Peat Bar and Hotel in Lima, Montana – Home of the Cook Your Own Steak
Peat Hotel - Lima, Montana
Peat Hotel – Lima, Montana
Peat Bar & Steak House
Peat Bar & Steak House

We also found the Lima Historical Society building, originally built in 1880.  It was originally called the Bailey Building, having been built and resided in by E.A. Bailey and sons, as a Mercantile.  It really did evoke an Old West feel to the place.

Historical Museum
Lima Historical Society Building – Lima Skyscraper
Historical Museum
Lima Historical Society

Perhaps the most interesting place we saw in town was the Wild West Weed Patch, at least that is what I think it is called based on the writing on the Saw Blade sign.  The shop was not open, but there were a number of unique things there.  Still,  I am certainly not sure what it is called.  The closest thing I have ever seen to this kind of hodge podge is Hillybilly Hotdogs in Lesage, West Virginia. (See my Trip Journal of my West Virginia Trip with photos)

The Weed Patch
The Wild West Weed Patch?? – shades of West Virginia’s Hillbilly Hotdogs
Weed Patch Sign
Wild West Weed Patch Sign – Lima, Montana
Steak and Burgers
Steak and Burgers – Lima, Montana
Ice Cream Cones
Ice Cream Cones – Lima, Montana
Lots of Stuff
Lots of Stuff
FJ's Skull?
FJ’s Skull?

After our little diversion in Lima we continued north on I-15 until we got to Red Rock Ranch Rd., south of Dillon.  On my trip down to Rexburg I had passed a ranch with hundreds of buffalo and I wanted a closer look on the way back to Shelby.  So, the night before the trip there I did some research and discovered it was one of Ted Turner’s Buffalo Ranches.  Called Red Rock Ranch, it could kind of be reached by taking Exit 29, north of Dell, Montana.  We went under the freeway and then turned right and almost immediately the road was a dirt road.  We followed it north, but alas, no buffalo to be seen.  So, after almost getting all the way to Clark Canyon Reservoir, we turned around.  Shortly down the road off to my left (the car window was open), I heard some birds squawking.  At first I thought they were geese, but they sounded different.  Then, all of a sudden I saw these two HUGE birds zip on past.  I whipped out the camera and took a bunch of shots hoping that one would reveal the secret.  Here are a couple of the shots of what I realized were Red-Crested Sandhill Cranes.  I had never seen these in the wild so it was a real treat.

Sandhill Cranes near Red Rock Ranch in Montana
Sandhill Cranes near Red Rock Ranch in Montana
Sandhill Cranes near Red Rock Ranch in Montana
Sandhill Cranes near Red Rock Ranch in Montana

Such beautiful birds!!

Well, we did finally get to see the buffalo, but not until we were continuing north on I-15.  I was determined to get some photos, so we stopped and I took these from my car on the side of the interstate.

Ted Turner's Buffaloes on Red Rock Ranch
Ted Turner’s Buffaloes on Red Rock Ranch
More of the Buffaloes
More of the Buffaloes
Buffaloes at Red Rock Ranch Rd. in Southern Montana
Buffaloes at Red Rock Ranch Rd. in Southern Montana

Thank goodness for telephoto lenses!!

We continued north and made a brief stop in Dillon.  I wanted to just kind of drive through the town and get a glimpse of it.  I had seen in my research that it had a very nice courthouse.

Dillon, Montana
Big Moose Statue in Dillon, Montana

I saw this moose, to add to my collection, but the lighting was not too good.  It was across the street from the post office.

Mural in Dillon, Montana
Mural in Dillon, Montana
Beaverhead County Courthouse
Beaverhead County Courthouse
Hotel Metlen in Dillon, Montana
Hotel Metlen in Dillon, Montana

The courthouse was one of the nice ones such as the ones can be seen in Texas and other places.  But, it was not the only unique building.  The Hotel Metlen was also a nice building. It was built in 1897 and is now apparently up for sale, based on the link above.

We then continued north on I-15 towards Butte and made a brief stop for fuel

Welcome to Butte
Welcome to Butte

After Butte we zipped up the interstate through Helena and and then a brief stop in Great Falls to get a birthday present before heading to Shelby.  Saw a nice George Washington statue at the Mall in Great Falls.  Similar to the statues I saw in Jackson, Wyoming done by Gary Lee Price, but I am not sure if it his work.

George Washington at mall in Great Falls
George Washington at mall in Great Falls
Cuddling with GW
Cuddling with GW

Finally, we made our way to Shelby to visit the grandchildren.  We spent three nights in Shelby and during that time did a number of things.  These will be noted in the next post.

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Road Trip to Idaho – Day 4: Shelby, MT to Rexburg, ID

Cabin in the Snow
Cabin in the Snow

March 25, 2013: After a fabulous couple of days in Shelby, MT with my daughter, her husband and all the kids, it was back on the road for the last leg of the trip to Rexburg.  This was basically a straight shot down I-15 thru Great Falls, Helena and Butte.   Unfortunately, the day started off pretty snowy and yucky.

Gas Station in Shelby, MT
Gas Station in Shelby, MT
Interstate 15 heading South towards Great Falls
Interstate 15 heading South towards Great Falls

By the time I had hit the Great Falls area, the weather was basically clearing up and so it was more or less smooth sailing to Helena.  I was provided an excellent view of Tower Rock State Park.

South on I-15 towards Tower Rock State Park
South on I-15 towards Tower Rock State Park

Tower Rock State Park is a 400-foot high igneous rock formation that lies along a stretch of the Missouri River north of Helena.  The river has formed a deep gorge into the rock. Tower Rock was noted in the Lewis and Clark Journals. Meriwether Lewis wrote in his journal on July 16, 1805: ‘At this place there is a large rock of 400 feet high wich stands immediately in the gap which the Missouri makes on it’s passage from the mountains… This rock I called the tower. It may be ascended with some difficulty nearly to its summit and from it there is a most pleasing view of the country we are now about to leave. From it I saw that evening immense herds of buffaloe in the plains below.’

Tower Rock State Park
Tower Rock State Park
Missouri River in Tower Rock State Park
Missouri River in Tower Rock State Park
Fishing on the Missouri
Fishing on the Missouri
Hardy Bridge in Tower Rock State Park
Hardy Bridge in Tower Rock State Park

I took Exit 244 for Hardy Creek on got on to Old US Highway 91 and followed it along the Missouri River.  This took me into the canyon area.  I then crossed over the Hardy Bridge and continued along the river.  Apparently, the silver steel bridge was the scene of the shootout between federal agents and rum-runners in the 1987 movie The Untouchables.

Along the Missouri River in the park - probably still how it may have looked for Lewis and Clark.
Along the Missouri River in the park – probably still how it may have looked for Lewis and Clark. This photo was taken with the iPhone Panorama function, thus the little shift on the left

Back on the freeway I moved a little further up the road to the Dearborn Rest Area in the Adel Mountains, a large stretch of volcanic remnants.  The volcanic remnants run about 40 miles in length and 20 miles wide, and the area of Tower Rock State Park is part of this old volcanic flow.

Adel Mountain Rest Area
Adel Volcanic Mountains as seen from Dearborn  Rest Area north of Helena

From the rest area I continued south to Exit 234 which brought me into Craig, MT. From what I could tell, Craig is all about fishing on the Missouri River and the other tributary creeks.  This section of the Missouri is apparently one of the premier trout fishing areas in the country.  As for the small town, it was named for local pioneer Warren Craig. In 1886 Craig built a log house, with a stone fireplace. Many times he had to defend his homestead from the Indians.  The house is located half mile from the Great Northern depot, but I was not able to get over it due to time constraints. In 1890 his son, John Craig settled in the area and Mrs. John Craig later served as postmaster.

Old Row Boat in Craig, MT
Old Row Boat in Craig, MT
Craig Train Stop
Craig Train Stop
Bridge over Missouri at Craig
Sign for Bridge over Missouri at Craig – Forrest H. Anderson Memorial Bridge

Ironically, my hope was a convenience store, but all that I could find were fishing related shops like the one below.

Headhunter Flies & Guides - Craig, MT
Headhunter Flies & Guides – Craig, MT
Geese hang around the Missouri River in Craig
Geese hang around the Missouri River in Craig

From Craig I got back on I-15 to continue south towards Helena.  I took exit 209 to see the “Gates of the Mountains.” Named by Meriwether Lewis on July 19, 1805 because of the 1200 foot tall towering limestone cliffs that seemed to block their way. He wrote, “this evening we entered much the most remarkable clifts that we have yet seen. these clifts rise from the waters edge on either side perpendicularly to the hight of 1200 feet. … the river appears to have forced its way through this immense body of solid rock for the distance of 5-3/4 Miles … I called it the gates of the rocky mountains.” Since that time the area has become a National Wilderness area by an act of Congress in 1964.

Gates of the Mountains Info Sign at Turnoff
Gates of the Mountains Info Sign at Turnoff

At this visitor turnoff there are not only the signs, but there is a metal sculpture of a man and a dog that greeted me.  Behind them was a spectacular view of the area.

Man and Dog at Gates of the Mountains view point
Man and Dog at Gates of the Mountains view point

I am not sure (and have done a lot of looking!!) to see who made this sculpture.  There is no information that I am aware of.  Another view of it shows the Gates of the Mountains in the background.

Man and Dog with Gates of the Mountains
Man and Dog with Gates of the Mountains

I did drive a bit down the road to get closer, but it is quite a drive down there.  The lake is Upper Holter Lake.

Gates of the Mountains near Helena, MT
Gates of the Mountains near Helena, MT

After this amazing scene (which the photo does no justice to), I continued south towards Helena.

I-15 South towards Helena
I-15 South towards Helena

I decided to go through Helena and then through Montana City and then on to Butte.  I decided to stop at the Butte Berkeley Pit overlook for my next stop.

Berkeley Pit - Butte, MT
Berkeley Pit – Butte, MT

The Berkeley Pit is a former open pit copper mine in Butte. It is one mile long by half a mile wide with an approximate depth of 1,780 feet. The mine was opened in 1955 and operated by Anaconda Copper and later by the Atlantic Richfield Company (ARCO), until its closure in 1982.

Berkeley Pit as seen from Downtown Butte
Berkeley Pit as seen from Downtown Butte

The viewpoint offers a couple of great sights.  First there is a spectacular view of the Anaconda Mountain range (also known as the Pintlars) east of Butte, which has a number of 10,000 foot tall peaks.  And, also from the overview point, to the west, you can see the 90 foot tall “Our Lady of the Rockies” statue 3500 feet above the view point (actual elevation is 8510 feet) .

Anaconda Range - east of Butte
Anaconda Range – east of Butte (tallest peaks include West Goat Peak, Mt. Evans, Mt. Haggin, Warren Peak and East Goat Peak – all over 10,000 feet tall)

The “Our Lady of the Rockies” statue was placed on the East Ridge on the Continental Divide overlooking Butte.  It is apparently the second tallest statue in the United States after the Statue of Liberty (see list of tallest statues on Wikipedia). The statue was built by volunteers using donated materials to honor women everywhere, especially mothers. The design for the statue was engineered by Laurien Eugene Riehl. He was a retired engineer for the Anaconda Company who donated his engineering skills to the project, specifically the statue would need to handle the intense winds at the top of the peak. A full photo of this huge beautiful statue is available here.

Our Lady of the Rockies statue as seen from the Butte Overlook
Our Lady of the Rockies statue as seen from the Butte Overlook
Our Lady of the Rockies info sign at Butte Overlook
Our Lady of the Rockies info sign at Butte Overlook

From the overlook I took a drive into Butte for fuel and a drive through town.  Here are a few sights of Butte:

Butte, Montana Welcoms sign
Butte, Montana Welcome sign
Mural on side of a building
Mural on side of a building
Old Building Advertisement, Butte, MT
Old Building Advertisement, Butte, MT
Acoma Restaurant Sign
Acoma Restaurant Sign
Lincoln Hotel Advertisement
Lincoln Hotel Advertisement
Colorful and Unique Architecture
Colorful and Unique Architecture

After the nice drive around Butte, it was back on I-15 heading south.  I was humored when I approached Exit 111 south of Butte.  The sign said Feely.  So, I took the exit just to get the sign…   Now I know how to get to Feely.  I just need to find Touchy next!!

Feely, MT sign
Feely, Montana sign

Not much further down the road was yet another interesting sign:

Divide Wisdom, MT
Divide Wisdom, MT

What I am wondering is if I need to really divide wisdom?  Can’t I keep the complete wisdom?  Actually, I would have liked to have made it to Wisdom.  I have been to Wisdom, KY.  I need more Wisdom!!

I-15 South of Divide/Wisdom, MT
I-15 South of Divide/Wisdom, MT
Union Pacific Bridge over the Big Hole River near Glen, MT
Union Pacific Bridge over the Big Hole River near Glen, MT

I continued south towards Idaho.  Though I was not able to get any photos, I passed by a HUGE Buffalo Ranch near Dillon.  I must have seen 200-300 head from the freeway.  Continuing south I passed the huge Clark Canyon Reservoir, with water frozen.

Clark Reservoir in Southern Montana
Clark Canyon Reservoir in Southern Montana

 

South on I-15 into Idaho
South on I-15 near Lima, MT

From Lima I soon entered into Idaho.  I ventured south into Spencer, Idaho, which is the home of the Opal Mountain Mine and is known as the Opal Capital of America.

Spencer, Idaho sign
Spencer, Idaho sign

Opals were apparently discovered in the Spencer area in 1948 and there is one big mine in operation.  there are a number of shops.  As it was a snowy Sunday, nothing was opened, but it was a unique little drive right off of the freeway.

High Country Opal - Spencer, ID
High Country Opal – Spencer, ID

 

Spencer Opal Mines
Spencer Opal Mines

 

Cabin in the Snow
Cabin in the Snow – near Spencer, ID

From Spencer I continued south and finally got to Exit 143 and headed east towards Rexburg, where I will be for the next couple of weeks.

East to Rexburg - notice big white temple n the middle of town
East to Rexburg – notice the big white LDS Temple in the middle of town and Tetons in the distance

Finally…hotel sweet hotel.  I am at the beautiful AmericInn Hotel.  My room even has a jacuzzi in it!!

AmericInn Rexburg Jacuzzi
AmericInn Rexburg Jacuzzi
Time for Bed - AmericInn, Rexburg
Time for Bed – AmericInn, Rexburg

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