A Grab Bag from America’s Back Roads – The B Things #AtoZChallenge

In 2018 I  will feature a random (yet alphabetical) selection of photos I have taken from my nearly 20 years of back roads travel in the United States and Canada.  I may even throw in a few random shots from other trips to Japan, Mexico and the Philippines. My theme is called America’s Back Roads: A Grab Bag of Places in Pictures.

 

Blueberry, WI

Old Antique Store in Blueberry, WI

Brazos Bend State Park – Needville, TX

Brazos Bend State Park, Texas
Another Gator in Brazos State Park

Bruce Windmill Farm – Woodstock, ON

Cliff Bruce Windmill Hill in Woodstock, ON is One of Ontario’s premier “roadart” places

Bison/Buffalo – Yellowstone National Park

Bison and calves relax by a lake in Yellowstone
A big bison poses for me in Yellowstone

Blackwater, Missouri

City of Blackwater, MO

Boring Post Office – Boring, Oregon

Boring Post Office
Entering Boring

Bridges of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Bridges of Pittsburgh

Bugtussle, Kentucky

Remember Jed Clampett from the Beverly Hillbillies??

What remains of the Bugtussle General Store in Bugtussle, KY

Buffalo Bill Museum – LeClaire, Iowa

Buffalo Bull Museum in LeClaire, Iowa

Beloit Smiley Water Tower – Beloit, WI

Beloit’s Smiley Water Tower greets visitors to Wisconsin

Two-State Sign – Bristol, TN and Bristol, VA

Bristol, Tennessee and Virginia – taken when we visited the Virginia Creeper Bike Trail

Beatles Tribute – Walnut Ridge, Arkansas

This way to Beatles Park at the corner of US 67 and Abbey Rd. in Walnut Ridge, AR
The Beatles Abbey Road Sculpture in Beatles Park.

Big Fish Supper Club – Bena, Minnesota

Big Fish Supper Club, Bena, MN
Complete view of the Big Fish Supper Club and the Big Fish in Bena, MN

Blue Heron Photos – Lexington, Kentucky & Uncertain, Texas

Blue Heron grabbing some breakfast
Blue Heron in Flight over Jacobson Lake in Kentucky
A blue heron flies by on Caddo Lake near Uncertain, Texas

Booger Hollow, Arkansas

Booger Hollow, Arkansas in 2007

Barbed Wire Sculpture at Sod House Museum – Gothenburg, Nebraska

Barbed Wire Indian Chief and Horse – Sod House Museum – Gothenburg, Nebraska

Bob Evans Headquarters – New Albany, Ohio

Bob Evans Farm HQ – New Albany, OH

Butte, Montana

Welcome to Butte, Montana

Blue Banana Espresso – Lostine, Oregon

Blue Banana Espesso Bar in Lostine, Oregon

Bessie the Cow – Janesville, Wisconsin

Bessie the Cow in Janesville, WI

Blues Highway – US 61 in Mississippi

Sumoflam at the Blues Highway in Mississippi

Beatles Statues – Houston, Texas

The 35 Foot tall Beatles statues by David Adickes, currently on display outside Houston’s 8th Wonder Brewery

Hot Spring Shower in Hot Spring Capital of Japan – Beppu, Japan

A hot spring shower in Beppu…and yes, the towel was necessary. 1990

Brown Pelicans in Formation – Galveston, Texas

Pelicans in formation over the Gulf of Mexico in Galveston, TX
Pelicans fly in formation over the beach in Galveston

Beartooth Pass – near Red Lodge, Montana

The Beartooth Range in northern Wyoming.
At the Beartooth Highway in May 2015

Big Stone Gap, Virginia

Big Stone Gap, VA

Boudreau’s Antiques and Collectibles – Ashland, Wisconsin

Boudreau’s Antiques Boudreau’s Antiques and Collectibles on US Hwy 2 east of Ashland, WI

Big Jud’s Burgers – Rexburg, Idaho

Big Jud’s Gourmet Burgers, Rexburg, ID
Total indulgence in a Big Jud’s “small” burger

Tersier Monkey in Bohol, Philippines

A Tersier in Bohol

Badlands National Park

Badlands National Park in SD
Sunset at the Badlands in South Dakota.

Big Apple – Medina, NY (Yes, the OTHER big apple in New York)

Big Apple Medina, NY

World’s Largest Buffalo – Jamestown, North Dakota

World’s Largest Buffalo in Jamestown, ND

Big Bone Lick State Park – Union, Kentucky

Big Bone Lick State Park, Kentucky

Big Indian – Bemidji, Minnesota

Big Indian in Bemidji, MN in front of a souvenir shop

Biedenharn Coca-Cola Museum – Vicksburg, Mississippi

Biedenharn Museum Sign, Vicksburg, MS

Big John – Great Falls, Montana

Cowboy Muffler Man – Big John in Great Falls, Montana

If you like what you see, you may want to check out my book: Less Beaten Paths of America: Unique Town Names, available on Amazon.  My second book, Less Beaten Paths of America: Quirky and Offbeat Roadside Attractions, will be available in late April or early May 2018. Click on the photo below for more details or to get a copy of the book.

Books 1 & 2

 

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I is for Ingenuity – #atozchallenge

I am always intrigued about the ingenuity of humans. Their ability to build and create things that solves problems for them.

There are many examples of ingenuity to can be seen on the back roads of America. Whether it be bridges or towers or buildings. There is always something unique and interesting to see.

Tuckhannock Viaduct – Nicholson, Pennsylvania
Nicholson’s welcome sign features the Viaduct

One of my brightest memories of fascination comes from a town in eastern Pennsylvania called Nicholson. In this town, the train company needed a solution to get the train up high to pass by as the town was down in the valley. So, a giant viaduct was built. Called the Tunkhannock Creek Viaduct, this giant structure. towered over the town and allowed the trains to pass by way up on top of the town nestled below in the valley. To realize that this was built in 1915 is amazing to me. It is 2375 feet long, 240 feet tall and 34 feet wide. Yes, 24 stories tall!!!!! The bridge was built as

The viaduct is dizzying when looking up from below

part of the Clark’s Summit-Hallstead Cutoff, which was part of a project of the Lackawanna Railroad to revamp a winding and hilly system. This rerouting was built between Scranton, Pennsylvania and Binghamton, New York. All thirteen piers were excavated to bedrock, which was up to 138 feet below ground level. Almost half of the bulk of the bridge is underground. The bridge was built by the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad and was designed by Abraham Burton Cohen. Construction on the bridge began in May 1912, and dedication took place on November 6, 1915.

Tuckhannock Viaduct towers over the small town of Nicholson, PA
Cleveland’s tallest buildings

One needs only go to some of the older big cities such as New York, Chicago, Pittsburgh, Cleveland or Cincinnati, to see the tall buildings that were built in the 1930s and 40s. Naturally, these were to accommodate offices are in a crowded area. The building designs were amazing and are still beautiful to look at.

I really love the older buildings as they were obviously much more difficult to build and their architecture is so reminiscent of the times. I guess I grew up watching the old Superman movies and saw the old buildings used in these.

New York City 1959 (from an old family picture – I was actually there when this was taken.  Only 3 years old)
New York City, 2013 – taken from Hoboken, NJ
Cincinnati Skyline with its old buildings and numerous bridges
The Ascent at Roebling’s in Covington, KY across the river from Cincinnati

But not all of the buildings are old. There is a unique condominium structure that was built in Covington, which is a suburb of Cincinnati across the Ohio River into Kentucky. The structure is unique in its architecture.  And the amazing PPG Building in Pittsburgh really blows my mind…a true glass castle!

 

A view from below One PPG Place
Bridge over Mississippi River at Cairo, IL

I have also grown a fascination with bridges. These are massive structures that cross rivers great and small. In Cairo, Illinois there are two massive and Long Bridges. Cairo is where the confluence of the Ohio River flows into the Mississippi River. The Ohio River is at its deepest and widest point here and when going south through this area one must cross a bridge over the Ohio and then over the Mississippi. These bridges are amazing and it stuns me that the traffic and the years have not worn these bridges away.

The New River Bridge in West Virginia is THREE Statues of Liberty high above the river.  An amazing feat of engineering.

River Crossing near Cairo, IL
A view of the Detroit-Superior Bridge in Cleveland
High Level Bridge in Lethbridge, Alberta was built in 1909. It is 5327 feet long and the largest of its type in the world
Roberto Clemente Bridge in Pittsburgh
Cut Bank Creek Trestle, built in 1900 in Cut Bank, Montana
Sunset over Tacoma Narrows bridge in Washington
Bridges of Pittsburgh
Some of the kids viewing the massive New River Gorge Bridge in West Virginia in August 1995
Green Bridge near Redcliff, Colorado

I once crossed over a bridge in a valley in the mountains of Colorado (see above). This bridge to was stunning to me is you come down off of the hill and see the bridge down below. I wondered out loud at the time how engineers could fulfill this feat.

Golden Gate Bridge in 2016

Another of the great and fascinating Bridges is the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco. Not only is it massive like the bridges in the east, it is also crossing over a giant bay and must also be earthquake proof.

Delaware Seashore Bridge
Veterans Memorial Bridge in Steubenville, OH

 

Some of the newer bridges are more unique and have their own kind of personality. The bridge crosses the bay in Delaware was stunning to me. I was fortunate enough to be at this bridge during sunset and cut the lovely photo of it above.

Many of the newer bridges have dozens of cables attached to large pillars.  They look futuristic and are cool to drive over.  I have seen quite of a few of these in recent years.

 

William H. Harsha Bridge from Maysville, KY into Ohio.
Rexburg, Idaho LDS Temple

Ingenuity is this not stop just at skyscrapers and bridges. There are many religious structures that can be seen across the country that are also amazing feats of engineering. Take for instance today LDS temple in Salt Lake City. The stones gathered to build that building came from the canyons and had to be hauled by horse drawn wagons.

Many of the other LDS temples are also spectacular.  But they are not the only religious buildings.

Old Church “San Xavier del Bac” in Tucson

The old church in Tucson, Arizona called San Xavier del Bac, was built in the 1700s and one can only wonder how the Spaniards built this beautiful and unique structure in the middle of the desert.

Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Galveston
Chapel of the Holy Cross in Sedona, AZ
St. Mary’s Basilica, Marietta, OH
Central Presbyterian in Cambridge, ON
Hoover Dam and Bridge (photo credit hdrinc.com)

I have crossed over the Hoover Dam in Nevada and the Glen Canyon Dam in Arizona numerous times. These are some of the largest dams in the United States and when you stand on the edge and look down it is dizzying. And to think that these damn’s were built in the 1940s and 1950s is amazing. The ingenuity of the engineers that designed and manage the construction of these is beyond words to me.

On the top of the world on Beartooth Highway that borders Wyoming and Montana south of Red Lodge, MT
Sumoflam at the Oak Creek Canyon Overlook in 1982. You can see hairpin turns at right

And finally, some of the highways themselves are stunning pizza engineering. Have I overused those words already? The Beartooth Highway in northern Wyoming and the highways that go across the Rocky Mountain National Park are a couple prime examples of this. Even the winding hairpin turns of Oak Creek Canyon Road from Flagstaff to Sedona are quite amazing.

Ingenuity from the 1880s — Longest Covered Bridge in Canada, West Montrose Covered Bridge, West Montrose, ON opened in 1881

Though I am more drawn to the unique and quirky things to see around the country and perhaps closer to the nature of birds and animals and trees and clouds, I am nevertheless grateful and overwhelmed by the ingenuity of humans in the spirit of design and innovation. What needs only open their eyes on the highway and think about some of the things that have been built whether they are bridges, buildings or even monuments to fallen heroes. There is always inspiration to be seen and felt from the ingenuity of the human spirit.

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