Everywhere a Sign – Some WELCOME Signs From 2018 #AtoZChallenge

Well, the Blogging Challenge is winding down.  It has been a wild and wacky challenge for me.

Through the month I have provided readers with a wide variety of wonderful signs which I wandered upon during the year.  As I do with all of my posts, I try to be witty and wry in my presentation. I hope that I have brought out the wanderlust in my readers as well.  This post will be all about Welcome Signs. Please now enjoy my special edition of W Signs from my travels over the years.  Enjoy the Read. Enjoy the Ride.

Welcome Signs Everywhere!

Welcome to my happy place…traveling everywhere

I love feeling welcome in places!  Perhaps one of my bigger “collections” of place signs along the highways of America are the Welcome signs to states, communities and places.  Here are just a few of the dozens and dozens have wandered upon in my travels.  This post features welcome signs taken from 2005 to present.  Want everyone to feel Welcome.

Welcome to my Welcome Blog Post
Welcome to Oklahoma

 

Welcome to Carew Tower Sign in Carew Tower Elevators, Cincinnati
Welcome to Henry, Illinois
Welcome to Kentucky, home sweet home
Welcome to Dime Box, Texas
Welcome to Zelienople-Harmony, Pennsylvania
Welcome to Kingston, Washington
Welcome to Punkyville, Kentucky… near Falmouth, Kentucky

We all know who is really Nice! Nice, CA

Welcome to Nevada sign in Denio, Nevada
Welcome to Leavenworth, Washington
Welcome to Shiner, Texas
Kabetogama Lake – Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota
Welcome to Gauley Bridge, West Virginia
Welcome to Cave City, Kentucky… gateway to Mammoth Cave National Park
Welcome to Tonica, Illinois
Welcome to the Monongahela Incline in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Welcome to Millersburg, Ohio
Welcome to Butte, Montana
Welcome to Big Stone Gap, Virginia
Welcome to Dublin, OH, Home of Wendy’s
Welcome to Estill County, Kentucky
Welcome to Santa Claus, Indiana
Welcome to West, Texas
Welcome to Alligator, Mississippi
Welcome to Silver Gate, Montana
Welcome to Choteau, Montana sign
Welcome to Metropolis, Illinois
Welcome to the Rockpile Museum in Gillette, Wyoming
Welcome to Council Bluffs, Iowa
Welcome to New Mexico at Raton Pass
Welcome to Damascus, Virginia
Welcome to Wyoming sign on US 30
Welcome to What Cheer, Iowa
Welcome to Winner, South Dakota – Pheasant Capital of the World
Welcome to Hope, Arkansas – birthplace of Bill Clinton
Welcome to Pittsburgh
Welcome to Viborg, South Dakota
Welcome to Hell, Michigan
Welcome to Peculiar, Missouri
Welcome to Sisters, Oregon
Welcome to Yellville, Arkansas
Welcome to Boring, Oregon
Welcome to Earth, Texas
Welcome to Vulcan, Alberta sign in Klingon
Welcome to Mystic Seaport, Mystic, Connecticut
Welcome to Seymour, Wisconsin Home of the Hamburger
Welcome to Pella, Iowa
Welcome to Montana in West Yellowstone
Welcome to Clallam Bay and Sekiu, Washington
Welcome to Stanley, Idaho
Welcome to Colorado at WY 789 and CO 13
Welcome to Bemidji, Minnesota
Welcome to Crawford, Nebraska
Welcome to Sharkheads in Biloxi Beach, Mississippi
Welcome to Salem Sue in New Salem, North Dakota
Welcome to Paris, Tennessee Catfish – they claim to be the Catfish Capital
Welcome to Real Goods, a great store in Hopland, California
Welcome to Kountry Korner’s Krazy Kreatures in Kingston, Washington
Welcome to Orr, Minnesota
Welcome to Mena, Arkansas
Welcome to White Castle, Louisiana
Welcome to New Hampshire in Sept 2015 – State #49!
Welcome to Gourdough’s Donuts in Austin, Texas
Welcome to Vermont, near Brattleboro on Vermont Hwy 142 — the 50th state I visited
Welcome to Kansas
Welcome to Alvin, Texas, hometown of Nolan Ryan
Welcome to West Virginia
Welcome to Kensington District of Toronto, Ontario

 

Welcome to Whitetop, Virginia
Welcome to Delaware…first time since 1986. Visited in 2016 during Christmas Holiday
Welcome to Heini’s Cheese Factory in Charming, Ohio
Welcome to Uranus, Missouri
Welcome to Hopkinsville, KY for the Solar Eclipse 2017
Welcome to Egg Harbor, Wisconsin
Welcome to Huntsville, Texas
Welcome to Wilsall, Montana (with the Welcome Bird on top of the sign!)
Welcome to Crookston mural in Crookston, Minnesota
Welcome to Cokeville, Wyoming
Welcome to Gregory, South Dakota
Welcome to Mars, Pennsylvania
Welcome to Talent, Oregon
Welcome to Pascagoula, Mississippi, Birthplace of Jimmy Buffet
Welcome to Waterville, Washington
Welcome to Canonsburg, Pennsylvania
Welcome to Ketchikan, Alaska … from my wife
Welcome to the Guitar Walk at Cavanaugh Park in Walnut Ridge, Arkansas
Welcome to Dienner’s Country Restaurant in Amish Country, Ronks, Pennsylvania
Welcome to Granbury, Texas
Welcome to North Dakota
Welcome to Hugo, Oklahoma… home of the country’s only cemetery dedicated to Circus Performers
Welcome to North Carolina
Welcome to Papa Joe’s Oasis, Crescent Junction, Utah
Welcome to Hochatown, Oklahoma
Welcome to Doolittle, Missouri
Welcome to Nitro, West Virginia
Welcome to Hipp Station of the Holmes County Rails to Trails in Millersburg, Ohio
Welcome to Pierre Part, LA, home of the TV Show Swamp People
Welcome to the Oyster Capital of the World, South Bend, Washington
Welcome to the Corn Palace…Mitchell, South Dakota
Welcome to Sweet Home Alabama with some of my grandchildren in early 2017
Sumoflam in Floodwood, Minnesota
Welcome to Luling, Texas
Welcome to Washington, Pennsylvania
Welcome to Jackson, Wyoming!!
A giant troll sculpture greets you at the Mount Horeb, Wisconsin Welcome Center. Created by Wally Keller
Welcome to Oacoma, South Dakota
Welcome to the Seattle Waterfront
Welcome to Hemingford, Nebraska
Welcome to Saco, Montana, birthplace of 1960s newscaster Chet Huntley
Welcome to Nekoma, North Dakota
Welcome to Jackson Center, Ohio. Home of Airstream
Welcome to Rabbit Hash, Kentucky
Nicholson, Pennsylvania’s welcome sign features the famous Viaduct
Welcome to Chelsea, Michigan
Welcome to Lost Springs, Wyoming Population 1 in 2007. Population 4 in 2017.
Welcome to Chinook, Montana
Welcome to Dallas, South Dakota where the main street goes under the water tower
Welcome to Buffalo, Wyoming
Welcome to Salida, Colorado
Welcome to Swedesburg, Iowa
Welcome to Steubenville, Ohio, a small town full of murals and history
Welcome to Montana on US Route 2 heading west
Welcome to Missouri
Welcome to Salt Lake City, Utah
Welcome to Walnut Ridge, Arkansas…home of the Rock N Roll Highway
Welcome to Wall, South Dakota, home of Wall Drug. Now you know where the heck it is.
Welcome to Many, Louisiana Not just a few here!
Welcome Sign in Indianapolis, Indiana
Welcome to Gold Bar, Washington Gateway to the Cascades
Welcome to Virden, Manitoba
Welcome to Saskatchewan
Welcome to Vulcan, Alberta Sept 2007 (look for me…)
Welcome to Beachville, Ontario…birthplace of Baseball
ENJOY!

Like what you see? Well, there is lots more!  I currently have two books about offbeat and quirky places to take on your road trips. You can see both of my books at http://amzn.to/2ks6fQZ. Working on Book 3, coming in late Spring 2019!!

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My Travels in 2018

Life gets so busy. The first two months of 2019 have been exceptionally busy and so I am just now getting to my annual review posts for 2018.

Visiting Route 66 in Oklahoma

At the beginning of 2018 I didn’t have very high hopes for many travel opportunities. I had begun a new job in early October of the previous year and I didn’t have any definitive travel plans. But, I had also learned to roll with things and, as good fortune would have it, 2018 actually became a really good travel year.

Over the course of the year I was able to travel through 26 different states and drove nearly 12,000 miles. I was able to add a plethora of photos (I took over 15,000 travel photos in 2018) and content for use in future blogs and books. Though many of my travels were alone (which I love), I also was able to travel with family on some of the trips (which I also love!).

Morning sky taken between Bend, OR and Brothers, OR (near Millican, OR) on US Hwy 20 heading east.
A sunset scene taken from the Edmonds to Kingston Ferry in Washington
Lovely sunset after a windy day. Taken on a side road of Interstate 70 just east of Abilene, Kansas
Mt. Aetna as seen from US 50 near Monarch Pass, Colorado.
Desert and snow-covered peaks in Nevada

My major trips included:

  1. A trip to Nashville in January to visit with my new employer ComicBook.com. On this trip I also visited the cool and “off-beat” Paradise PointMarketplace
    Welcome to Paradise Point
  2. In late January I made a trip down to Barren River Lake State Park in southern Kentucky to view the sandhill cranes which had migrated down there.
    Sandhill Cranes take flight
  3. In February I was asked by son Seth to come down to Cypress, Texas to watch his two sons for a couple of weeks while he and his wife were off on a cruise. The trip south took me through Calvert City, KY where I visited the Apple Valley Toy Land and Hillbilly Gardens. I also found my way to Kenton, Arkansas, home of the white squirrels, then to historic Walnut Ridge, Arkansas to see some fun Beatle’s things. I then meandered my way into Louisiana and visited a few fun places. While in Cypress with the boys I also visited Austin and then took the boys venturing out on some of the back roads around the Houston area where we discovered some fun places. My return trip took me up to Keller, Texas to visit my sister and while there I found a few more fascinating places. I then made my way home through Oklahoma and Arkansas, traveling back roads all the way and discovering some fun places. I finally returned to Lexington at the end of February.                                                                                               
    Apple Valley Hillbilly Garden – Calvert City, Kentucky
    Sumoflam with the Beatles in Walnut Ridge, AR
    The Beatles in Houston, statues by Houston artist David Adickes
  4. March saw me again on the road for a quick trip up to Cleveland, Ohio. On this trip, with my wife, we visited sites in Cleveland and then on the way home stopped in Columbus to see the famed Topiary Garden Park. It was a quick, yet fun and interesting trip. 
    Topiary Garden Park of Columbus
  5. On April 2 I set off on one of the biggest road trips I have had in a couple of years. We had a family event taking place in Port Orchard, Washington. I drove while my wife flew (she had a tighter schedule and needed to take some PTO time). I set out heading west through Indiana, Illinois and Iowa. I had hoped to go up through Minnesota, but a major snowstorm diverted much of my initial plan. Nonetheless, I always find something. This trip allowed me to visit seven different Peter Toth “Whispering Giants” , which also took me to other unique places along the way. I ultimately made my way through Iowa Falls, Cedar Rapids, northern South Dakota and overnight in Belle Fourche. I then headed northwest into snowy southeastern Montana and crossed the state from there through Bozeman, Butte, Missoula and overnight in scenic and touristy Wallace, Idaho. From Wallace I made my way to Spokane and then east on US 2, to complete my travels on the western portion of that highway (other parts I had driven on in previous road trips. This took me through Washington’s high desert and then into the Cascades and back down into apple orchard country. I ultimately made my way into the Seattle area. The return trip went down through Olympia and then into Oregon on US 101 and then across Oregon’s high desert, through Winnemucca, Nevada and then into my old stomping grounds in Murray, Utah, near Salt Lake City. I then ventured to Colorado Springs to see my son Solomon and then across Colorado’s high deserts into western Kansas, and finally back home through St. Louis and Louisville. It was an amazing two week adventure! 
    Visiting the Whispering Giant at Starving Rock State Park in Illinois
    One of over 200 sculptures from around Raymond, Washington
    A stretch of Oregon Highway 205 south of Burns, Oregon
    Leavenworth, Washington
    Snow walls taller than me on both sides of the road at Stevens Pass in Washington
    Helper, Utah
    Dignity: Of Earth and Sky – 50 foot tall statue by Dale Lamphere near Chamberlain, South Dakota
    Men’s Room Door at a gas station in Ashland, Montana
    US Hwy 101 in southern Washington
    Garden of the Gods in Manitou Springs, Colorado
    On the road somewhere in NW Nevada
  6. I didn’t really venture out on a road trip again until mid-June when my wife and I took a day long trip up to Cincinnati to see some things we hadn’t done before. It was a nice sightseeing adventure.
    A day trip to Cincinnati with my wife
    The John A. Roebling Suspension Bridge as seen from Carew Tower in Cincinnati. When opened on December 1, 1866, it was the longest suspension bridge in the world at 1,057 feet main span.
  7. In late July I was joined by my oldest grandchild Autumn for a fun adventure to Cypress, Texas. I was again asked to babysit my two granddsons for about ten days. Autumn and I meandered our way down there through Tennessee and Alabama down to the gulf coast and into Biloxi, Mississippi. We traveled along the Gulf Coast into Louisiana and eventually into Texas. While in Texas, the four of us made a few trips as well, including a day-long adventure to the weird city of Austin. Autumn and I then returned home through central Texas and up to Keller to stay with my sister and allow Autumn to hang with her cousin, who is the same age. After a couple of days in Keller, Autumn and I returned home through Oklahoma, Kansas and into Missouri, where we visited the unique touristy place called Uranus and then finally home. It was an amazing fun trip.
    Sharkhead in Biloxi, Mississippi
    Decatur, Texas
    Welcome to Uranus Missouri
    Getting stabbed in Bowie, Texas
    One of hundreds of frog statues in Rayne, Louisiana
    Peach Water Tower in Clanton, Alabama
    One of a number of murals in a section of Houston
    Vulcan Statue, one of America’s tallest, in Birmingham, Alabama
    Woody Guthrie Water Towers in Okemah, Oklahoma

    Over the next few posts, I will try to catch up with content about different themes…road scenes, wood art, murals, roadside attractions and more.

    I hope you will enjoy the ride with me as I revisit these adventures.

Have you seen my most recent book yet? “Less Beaten Paths of America: Quirky and Offbeat Roadside Attractions” is available on Amazon!

The book is 130 pages of FULL COLOR whimsy and kitsch as I tell stories of my visits to these places all over the U.S. and Canada. Definitely was fun taking these back roads trips to quirkville and I am excited to share them with you in words and photos.   I hope you will be able to check out the book or even get it on Kindle.

You can order the book here:   See Offbeat and Quirky Roadside Attractions

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Cincinnati: A View from the Top – Carew Tower

A view of downtown Cincinnati from atop the Carew Tower

Had a wonderful (but hot) Father’s Day 2018.  My wife asked me what I wanted to do, and I said I wanted to take a trip to Cincinnati and visit the downtown area for fun.  Cincinnati is one of those cities that has a great skyline to photograph.

So, before we went, I looked for places that we could get good views of Cincinnati.  In the past, I have taken shots from across the river in Newport, KY and a couple of other spots, but I wanted something more unique.

Cincinnati skyline as seen from Devou Park in Covington, KY. Carew Tower is tall brown building on the left

More expansive view of the Cincinnati Skyline from Devou

Our first stop was in Devou Park, east of Cincinnati and across the Ohio River in Covington, KY.  Devou Park sits up on a big hill and offers some wonderful views of the city.

Another view of Cincinnati from Devou Park

Cincinnati as seen from Devou Park

After Devou Park we headed downtown for another chance to see the city.

A Panorama View of Cincinnati from the top of Carew Tower.

The 49 story tall Carew Tower in Downtown Cincinnati

Great American Tower as seen from the top of Carew Tower.

Enter the Carew Tower. The Carew Tower is a 49-story, 574-foot Art Deco building completed in 1930 in the heart of downtown Cincinnati, Ohio, overlooking the Ohio River waterfront.the city.  It overlooks the Cincinnati waterfront and offers a panoramic view of the city.   It is the second tallest building in the city, but was the tallest until 2010 when the Great American Tower was completed.  It is 86 ft higher than Carew Tower, but Carew Tower is actually still the highest elevated building in the city so viewers from the observation deck can look down on the Great American.

Welcome to Carew Tower Sign in Carew Tower Elevators

Art Deco Window on the 2nd floor of the Carew Building

Grand Hall in the Hilton section of the Carew Tower

Art Deco design in the elevators

Historically, the Carew Tower was built in 1929/1930 in an Art Deco style with the idea to have a hotel, a shopping area, etc.  Basically, a city within a city.  It was named after Joseph T. Carew, who founded the Mabley & Carew Department Store Chain.   We didn’t have the opportunity to look inside the Hilton Netherland Plaza Hotel, but probably should have as there are a number of massive murals inside the building as well as some immaculately ornate rooms.  This deserves a next trip!!

That said, the highlight was the view from the top.  Enter the hotel from the parking lot on the second floor and take the elevator, an express zoom up to the 45th floor.  Once off that elevator, its a short walk around a corner to a much smaller (and older) elevator which takes you to the 48th floor and then a few steps up to the 49th.  Pay your $4 fee and step out to a spectacular view, one that lets you look over the river to Kentucky and way west into Indiana.  Following are a few of the shots I got from the top:

The John A. Roebling Suspension Bridge as seen from Carew Tower. When opened on December 1, 1866, it was the longest suspension bridge in the world at 1,057 feet main span.

The 4th and Vine Tower is 31 stories (495 feet) tall. It was formerly known as the Union Central Tower and Central Trust Bank Building. When completed in 1913, this was the fifth tallest building in the world.

The Daniel Carter Beard Bridge is 2099.5 feet long. The bridge was built in 1976. Also called the Big Mac bridge because of the “Golden Arches” reminiscent of McDonald’s.

Wife Julianne takes in the view

Downtown buildings of Cincinnati as seen from Carew Tower.

The top of the Great American Tower at Queen City Square. The tallest building in Cincinnati at 41 stories and 665 feet tall It was completed in January 2011.

A view of the Union Terminal in Cincinnati as seen from Carew Tower. Built in 1933, it is another great example of Art Deco architecture. It is now home to the Cincinnati Museum Center.

The Clay Wade Bailey Bridge over the Ohio River. Built in October 1974, the bridge is 2208 Feet long.  The bridge in the background is the Brent Spence Bridge which handles I-71/I-75. Built in 1960, it is 1736 feet long.

Mother of God Roman Catholic Church across the Ohio River in Covington, KY.  Built in 1869

The Queen City sign as seen from the top of Carew Tower

Happy at the Top (despite the 100 degree day)

ENJOY THE RIDE!  CHOOSE HAPPY!

If you like what you see, you may want to check out my book: Less Beaten Paths of America: Unique Town Names, available on Amazon.  My second book, Less Beaten Paths of America: Quirky and Offbeat Roadside Attractions, is currently being worked on and I hope to make it available in late  June  or  mid -July 2018. Click on the photo below for more details or to get a copy of the book.

Books 1 & 2

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