Tag Archives: Cleveland OH

The Year in Travel: 2016 from A to Z

The year 2016 was not a banner year for travel for me as there were no super long  cross country trips taken like I had done form 2012-2015. However, over the course of the year we did take a number of smaller trips and a couple of fairly long trips. I visited 11 states during the year and made it to some places where I hadn’t been for nearly 30 years. Even made it into towns from A (Abingdon, VA) to Z (Zanesville, OH) and one with an X too (Xenia, OH)!!

Here is a map that includes many of the places:

Abingdon, VA – Eastern terminus of the Virginia Creeper Trail
Zanesville, Ohio home of the Y Bridge
Julianne and David at Xenia Station on the Little Miami Scenic Trail

During the course of the year we visited a few major cities including Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Washington DC, Houston and the Dallas-Fort Worth area. We also visited Nashville and Memphis in Tennessee.

Panoramic View of Pittsburgh from atop Mt. Washington
Julianne and Laura at the North Bend Rail Trail HQ in Cairo, WV

A good portion of my travel in 2016 was related to rails to trails bike trails that my wife Julianne had desired to ride. We visited some lovely bike trails in Ohio, Kentucky, West Virginia and Virginia. While Julianne rode, I would take the back roads and meet her along the trails. This was until I got my own bicycle on my birthday in October.

All of us at Whitetop Station at the beginning of the 10 mile downhill Virginia Creeper Bike Trail near Damascus, VA
Flying to Houston from Cincinnati

We took one flight during the year which was to Houston to celebrate a calling for my son in church and to visit our grandsons. In late October, we also drove to Fort Worth, Texas for the funeral of my father. Not as joyous a trip, but we did visit a few locations along the way for fun.

Visiting my youngest grandchild Sam in Houston
Sumoflam and the FREE Stamp in Cleveland

Our trips to Cleveland and Pittsburgh were predominantly because Julian sister Laura had moved from Idaho to the Pittsburgh area. So she met Julianne on a couple of the bike ride trips. She and Julianne also attended a conference at the Kirtland Temple and while they were there, I visited my family in Little Italy in Cleveland and also took some tours around the city with my sister Tina and her husband Jim.

Riding with Tina and Jim around Cleveland
Sumoflam at the Kirtland Temple
Monongahela Incline in Pittsburgh

Then we visited Laura in Pittsburgh, we got to see a number of wonderful things in Pittsburgh including the Monongahela Incline, hey unique rail type system that pulled us up to the top of Mt. Washington where we had spectacular views of the city of Pittsburgh and the three rivers down below.

Bridges across Pittsburgh
Classic Neon of famed Dumser’s Drive-In in Ocean City, MD

The year ended on a high note as we took a long trip to Ocean City, MD where we stayed with Julianne’s sister and her husband Richard and their daughter for about a week on the beach. It was a wonderful trip! It was during this trip that we also visited Washington DC and the large LDS Washington DC Temple with all of its amazing Christmas lights. I also made my way up to Bethany Beach and Rehoboth Beach in Delaware, both of which I had not visited since the 1980s.

Welcome to Delaware…first time since 1986
Washington DC Temple at Christmas
The Washington Monument and the US Capitol in Washington DC
Old Paradise Cafe sign in Ocean City. What is a beach resort town without a flamingo or two?
I think I counted about 12 themed mini golf places on the main drag in Ocean City, including dragons, pirates and dinosaurs.
Township of Moon, PA (I have also been to Earth, TX, Mars, PA, Jupiter, FL and even Vulcan, AB

Of course, whenever we take road trips I always try to find the unique and the unusual whenever possible. And most of our trips were not immune from my searching to do so. On our trips visited such wonderful places as Friendly, WV, Prosperity, PA, Novelty, OH, Happy, KY, Eighty Four, PA and a few other unique named towns as indicated in photos below.  I even located a Yellow Brick Road in Ohio and a Bliss Happens Lane in Maryland!

Made it to Hope, AR, just before the 2016 elections. Hope is the home of former President Bill Clinton.
Meeting a Friendly guy outside the Friendly, WV Post Office
Happy Happy Happy…yes, there is a Happy, KY
I found Novelty in Ohio…
…and found Prosperity in PA
There is a Yellow Brick Road in Ohio
A Sugar and Water corner is in Chillicothe, OH
No Name Street in Millersburg, OH
Lost? Try going the Udder Way, This is in Yellow Springs, OH at Young’s Dairy
And I found where Bliss Happens in Maryland
Reuben Sandwich and Sweet Potato Fries at In the Country in Damascus, VA

During the year we often ate at places that were focused on bicyclists and motorbike enthusiasts. One such location was in Oregonia, OH. It was way out of the way to get to. Then there was the place on the Virginia Creeper Trail which was almost impossible to get to my car but was built specifically for the bicyclists coming down the Virginia Creeper Trail.

In the Country Bakery and Eatery on the outskirts of Damascus
At Damascus Old Mill Inn in Damascus
The Little River Cafe in Oregonia, OH is most easily reached by bike. It is literally on the side of the trail. The road to Oregonia is way out of the way.
Elliston Place Diner in Nashville

In August, we got to visit Nashville and hang with my good friend and musician Antsy McClain. He took us around with a few other “field trippers” and showed us some of the sites of Nashville including music Row, some music dives and some good places to eat including the oldest diner in Nashville. We also have the unique chance to sit in a recording studio with Antsy and sing back up vocals on one of his songs!

Hanging with Antsy McClain at a dive in Nashville
Had lunch at Flatrock Coffee in Nashville. Great food and a large collection of one of a kind Antsy McClain art on coffee cups
Antsy McClain art on Coffee Cups — one of dozens of original pieces on display at Flatrock Coffee in Nashville
The Antsy Backup gang at the recording studio in Nashville
Sanders Cafe in Corbin, KY. Birthplace of the KFC Special Recipe

During the course of the year, I also took a few “staycation” trips within Kentucky. This included one on the bike trail with Julianne, but also to Ravenna,  where I visited hey famed café called the Wigwam. I also took a fun trip with my grandchildren and my daughter Marissa down to Cumberland Falls and then on into Corbin to visit the Harlan Sanders museum and restaurant which is where the recipe for Kentucky Fried Chicken got it start. During the fall I took a solo trip up into Red River Gorge to get pictures of the fall colors. I was about a week too late to get most of them, but that was because we were in south eastern Virginia on the Creeper Trail to see the beautiful colors down there.

Birthplace of KFC
Visiting Cumberland Falls with my daughter and her kids.
The Colonel and Me at Sanders Cafe
The fall colors as seen from the Virginia Creeper Trail near Damascus, VA
Visiting Kentucky’s Red River Gorge in November
Colorful trees and leaves line a small road in Red River Gorge
Story of Superman at Joe Shuster’s former home

Some of the other more unique places that I got to see over the past year would include the “Birthplace of Superman,” which was in Cleveland, as well as the house where the movie “A Christmas Story”  was filmed. Also while in Ohio, I visited the world’s largest geodesic dome in Novelty, OH. That was fascinating.

Of course, I can’t neglect to mention the visit to Little Italy to see my birthplace and family.  I ate fine Italian cuisine at Mama Santa’s and had a great time seeing other sites there. Its the best Little Italy in the US!

Cleveland Water Tower
Murray Hill Rd….where I was born. Little Italy
Sumoflam with Mama Santa’s owner Papa Tio
The Wendy’s Original $150,000 Crystal Cheeseburger created by Waterford Crystal

During the year I also visited two fast food restaurants that had included museums in them. The Wendy’s restaurant in Dublin, OH had a whole section built in there with the history of Wendy’s and a large statue of Wendy’s founder Dave Thomas. In Canonsburg, PA, there is a McDonald’s restaurant that includes dedications and memorabilia of Perry Como and Bobby Vinton, both of whom grew up in Canonsburg.

Home of Wendy’s
“Where’s the Beef?” memorabilia from the famed advertising campaign in the Wendy’s Museum in Dublin, OH
Sumoflam with Dave Thomas statue in Dublin, OH
Bobby Vinton Statue in the Canonsburg, PA McDonald’s
Bobby Vinton Stage items on display in Canonsburg McDonald’s

It was fun for me to visit Xenia, OH and see the murals and the architecture and then also travel around some of the other areas nearby with Julianne and her sister and/or our grandchildren who rode  their bikes along some of the bike trails including the Little Miami Scenic Trail.

We visited the Little Miami Scenic Trail twice and each time had a great time.

Julianne, Marissa and the kids on the Little Miami Scenic Trail near Beatty Station, OH
We stopped at Young’s Dairy for some fresh ice cream on this hot day
One of Peter Toth’s 50+ Whispering Giants…this one in Ocean City, MD

Overall, I have to say it was a wonderful year. I saw dolphins swimming at sunrise on Christmas morning in the Atlantic Ocean in Maryland. We got to visit some of our great national historical sites in Washington DC. On many of the trips, it was fun to travel with the grandchildren and see the delight in their eyes they saw big waterfalls, giant statues and other interesting places.

Christmas morning sunrise in Ocean City , MD and greeted by a dolphin in the foreground.
Delaware Seashore Bridge
Another Peter Toth Whispering Giant in Bethany Beach, DE
Sumoflam at the Wigwam Drive-In in Ravenna, KY

On a final note, I have to say that we did visit a few interesting places to eat. A great taco place in Houston, and, as I mentioned before, the Wigwam in Ravenna, KY.  Also of note were the Crabcake Factory in Ocean City, MD and a Japanese place with a unique name Saketumi, in Rehoboth Beach, DE.

Japanese food at the Saketumi Asian Bistro in Rehoboth Beach, DE
Enjoyed a nice Amish Buffet in Ronks, PA on the way back from Maryland

As I start a new position in new venture 2017, I look forward to traveling. The new company (PrecisionHawk) is in Raleigh, NC and so I will be taking a trip there in early January. Who knows what other delights I will find in 2017.

Following are a few other random shots from my trips in 2016:

Sumoflam with Nancy Starvaggi Schaffer, showing off the AMAZING homemade sausage and pasta from Mama Santa’s Restaurant in Cleveland, OH
We visited Texas in October. This was in Texarkana, TX
A shot with Elvis in Memphis
A large mural of a train welcomes visitors to Ravenna, KY
The Washington Court House in Washington Court House, OH was one of many unique buildings I got to visit in 2016
Cleveland Fire Memorial
Assawoman Dr. in Ocean City, MD
Visited Moon, PA in 2016. Visited Earth, TX in 2011. Earth vs Moon Police!
World’s largest Geodesic Dome in Novelty, OH
Many Unique Restaurants could be found in Ocean City and up in Delaware…
Fun with my wife at Chagrin Falls in Ohio
Bristol, Tennessee and Virginia – taken when we visited the Virginia Creeper Bike Trail
An old Mail Pouch barn in Brinkhaven, OH
Of course, you can always come across unique shop names, like this one in Houston
Killbuck Depot on the Holmes County Trail in Ohio
A Pal’s Sudden Service building. Lots of fun and it looks like the food is great too.
The Got Muchies Truck in Royalton, KY. Too funny for words
Had to add this sign…this place was one of our true 2016 highlights!
The 370 foot long Bridge of Dreams over the Mohican River near Brinkhaven.
Damascus calls itself Trail Town USA for a reason. The Appalachian Trail, the Virginia Creeper Trail and others come to a crossroads here.
Korean War Memorial in Zanesville, OH… hundreds of real helmets
Welcome to 84 Country – Eighty Four , PA
Sumoflam at Chagrin Falls Popcorn Shop in Ohio
Holmes County Trail is in the middle of Amish Country. The Bike Trail is shared with Amish Buggies
Hiker painting on a restroom wall in Damascus

 

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A Super Day in Cleveland

Cleveland Water Tower
Cleveland Water Tower

I recently made a trip up to Cleveland to visit family in Little Italy (see the post about the Little Italy neighborhood HERE).  While there, I got to spend a day with my sister and her husband visiting sites in and around Cleveland as well as a few small treks on my own.  With the challenge of only a couple of days, I made it a point to visit some of the quirky and offbeat sites as well as a couple of historic things.  We saw a good deal of Cleveland and also visited the Kirtland area, which will be added to a different post.

A Lake Erie sunrise as caught from the Kenneth J. Sims park
A Lake Erie sunrise as caught from the Kenneth J. Sims park in Euclid, OH
Canadian Geese fly low over Lake Erie
Canadian Geese fly low over Lake Erie

I started off one of my mornings by going to Lake Erie at Kenneth J. Sims Park in Euclid, which is right on the lake and offers some nice views.  It is also home to the Henn Mansion Historical Site.  and getting some marvelous photos of the sunrise over the lake and saw some geese and a blue heron. Those that follow my blogs and Facebook posts know that I love nature as much as I like traveling and seeing quirky sites.

Welcome to Euclid
Welcome to Euclid
At the house that used to be the home of Jerry Siegel, the Creator of the Superman stories
At the house that used to be the home of Jerry Siegel, the Creator of the Superman stories

I next made my way into Cleveland to go visit the “birthplace” of Superman. In the 1930s, teenagers Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster, both of whom went to the same Glenville High School and both had the same love of science fiction stories, either as novels or comic strips, and even lived only a couple of blocks apart, created a comic book hero named Superman. Siegel ended up writing the original stories and then Shuster would put them into comic book form. (See a more complete story about these two HERE.)

Jerry Siegel's former home in Cleveland. This was the real birthplace of Superman.
Jerry Siegel’s former home in Cleveland. This was the real birthplace of Superman.
A plaque in front of the Jerry Siegel house gives the history of his work.
A plaque in front of the Jerry Siegel house gives the history of his work.
Superman Street signs at the corner of Kimberley and Parkwood in Cleveland - Jerry Siegel Lane and Lois Lane
Superman Street signs at the corner of Kimberley and Parkwood in Cleveland – Jerry Siegel Lane and Lois Lane
Urban decay is rampant in the neighborhood where Superman was born
Urban decay is rampant in the neighborhood where Superman was born

Nowadays, the neighborhood is actually kind of a scary part of Cleveland. It has suffered a great amount of urban decay as some of these photos below indicate. But the neighborhood and the street that Superman memorial is on, is generally well-kept. It is a predominantly African-American neighborhood now and the people in this neighborhood take good care of their homes despite the age of the buildings.

Sad state of housing in this aging part of Cleveland
Sad state of housing in this aging part of Cleveland
Amor St. has become Joe Shuster Lane. It too is on Parkwood (known also as Lois Lane)
Amor St. has become Joe Shuster Lane. It too is on Parkwood (known also as Lois Lane)
Story of Superman at Joe Shuster's former home
Story of Superman at Joe Shuster’s former home

Both the house that Superman was “born” in and then Joe Shuster’s house as well have a big superman S on the front of the fence along with a big plaque commemorating the history of Superman and the stories of Jerry and Joe. Obviously, when you think about Metropolis for Superman, or Gotham City for Batman, the cities are old and dark much like New York, Chicago or even cities like Cleveland and Pittsburgh.

Action Comics blowups at Joe Schuster Home
Action Comics blowups at Joe Schuster Home
Parkwood has become Lois Lane
Parkwood has become Lois Lane

I got a chuckle out of the street names for both the street that Superman “the story” was created (Kimberley) and then Superman “the comic book character” (Amor) was drawn. In both cases they have street signs with the original names of the artists. And both streets come off of Parkwood, also known as “Lois Lane.”

Laurienzo Family
Breakfast with my Laurienzo sisters, brother and cousins. A great reunion!!
Alfredo'sAfter my visit to the Superman sites, I joined much of my Laurienzo family for a big breakfast at a place called Alfredo’s at the Inn in Mayfield Village.   Though known for their Italian Cuisine in the evenings, they also have a nice breakfast menu and buffet.  It is really a good place for big groups like ours.
Riding with Tina and Jim around Cleveland
Riding with Tina and Jim around Cleveland

After a nice breakfast, my sister Tina and her husband Jim took me on a grand tour of Cleveland including Downtown and some of the surrounding areas.  It was nice to spend an extended time with them and get to know them better.  My sister Tina, the second oldest, always seems to have a bright shiny countenance.  Jim is also lots of fun.

Cleveland Skyline
Cleveland Skyline
Downtown Cleveland
Downtown Cleveland

Cleveland is an old industrial city and thus there are many old buildings and lots of old housing districts. There is the old steel mill section that is now been refurbished in there trying to use it as a shopping or entertainment district now.  And, being both a Lake Town (Lake Erie) and a River Town (the 100 mile long Cuyahoga River — the river is famous for having been so polluted that it “caught fire” in 1969. The event helped to spur the environmental movement in the US.),  there are many bridges dotting the city.

Cleveland is a city of bridges
Cleveland is a city of bridges – including the blue Main Avenue Bridge and the Detroit-Superior Bridge, also known as the Veterans Memorial Bridge
Entrance to the Hope Memorial Bridge which I visited on a different trip.
Entrance to the Hope Memorial Bridge which I visited on a different trip. The Art Deco “Guardians of Traffic” adorn this bridge.
One of the massive sculptures on the Hope Memorial Bridge
One of the massive sculptures on the Hope Memorial Bridge

The two Art Deco style sandstone sculptures on the bridge (shown above), known as the “Guardians of Traffic,” were created by New York sculptor Henry Hering.  There are actually eight of them. They were completed in 1932 and were named by the bridge’s engineer, Wilbur Watson.   Each guardian holds a different ground vehicle.The Cleveland Magazine had a very nice writeup about the Guardians in a post in 2009.  It is worth a read and can be seen HERE.

 

Arches of the Detroit-Superior Bridge
Arches of the Detroit-Superior Bridge
Steel Span of Detroit-Superior Bridge
Steel Span of Detroit-Superior Bridge

I have always been fascinated by bridges, especially large viaduct types of bridges.  Cleveland has a couple of these.  The Detroit–Superior Bridge (officially known as the Veterans Memorial Bridge) is a 3,112 foot long through arch bridge over the Cuyahoga River. Construction began in 1914 and the bridge was completed in 1918.  At its completion, the bridge was the largest steel and concrete reinforced bridge in the world.

An alternate view of the Detroit-Superior Bridge in Cleveland
An alternate view of the Detroit-Superior Bridge in Cleveland
Steel Structure of the Main Avenue Bridge in Cleveland
Steel Structure of the Main Avenue Bridge in Cleveland

Until 2007, the Main Avenue Bridge was the longest bridge in the state. Though no longer the longest, the bridge  is still considered to be the longest historic bridge in Ohio. The total structure length of this historic bridge including ramps is 8000 Feet The bridge’s clearance over the river is 100 Feet.This bridge is a significant example of a deck cantilever structure, and represents a significant engineering achievement of the time. Five people were killed during the construction of this bridge.

MainAveBridge
Main Avenue Bridge in Cleveland
One of many Lift Bridges in Cleveland
One of many Lift Bridges in Cleveland

DSC_3742The city is also a treasure trove of some unique statues and monuments.  Most notable is the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument. This monument to Civil War soldiers and sailors from Cuyahoga County is located in the southeast quadrant of Public Square in downtown Cleveland.  It was opened on July 4, 1894. It was designed by architect Levi Scofield, who also created the monument’s sculptures.

One of four bronze statues that surround the monument. Called "At Short Range" it is a representation of the Artillery Group
One of four bronze statues that surround the monument. Called “At Short Range” it is a representation of the Artillery Group
Looking up at the Lady Liberty 125 Feet High
Looking up at the Lady Liberty 125 Feet High
 I never knew about this amazing monument.  The monument consists of a 125-foot black granite shaft erected on a square base constructed of rough-hewn granite blocks trimmed in sandstone and housing a memorial building. The shaft divided by six carved bands which list the names of battles in which Cuyahoga soldiers fought and is topped with a bronze statue of the “Goddess of Liberty” signifying loyalty to United States. Four bronze groupings at its base depict the four branches of the Union Army— the Navy, Cavalry, Infantry, and Artillery.
A portion of The Color Guard - which is a representation of the Infantry group.
A portion of The Color Guard – which is a representation of the Infantry group.
Following are a few more photos from the monument —
Eagle on the Monument
Eagle on the Monument
"Mortar Practice" represents the Navy Group. In this sculpture, an officer and five men are loading a mortar, preparing to fire upon enemy entrenchments.
“Mortar Practice” represents the Navy Group. In this sculpture, an officer and five men are loading a mortar, preparing to fire upon enemy entrenchments.

DSC_3761DSC_3776

Marble Tablet with names of soldiers
Marble Tablet with names of soldiers

Inside the memorial building are a series of marble tablets listing 10,000 Civil War veterans that served with Cuyahoga County regiments or were from Cuyahoga County.

 

Liberty at top of monument
Liberty at top of monument
Lincoln Bronze Relief representing the end of the Civil War.
Lincoln Bronze Relief representing the end of the Civil War.
Sumoflam with Bronze Relief of Emancipation
Sumoflam with Bronze Relief of Emancipation

Also in the building,  above the tablets, on the east and west walls are the bronze busts of officers who were killed in action. Above the north side door is the bust of General James Barnett, and above the south side door is Captain Levi T. Scofield. The foundation of the column centers the room. On each of the four sides are bronze relief statues portraying the Beginning of the War in Ohio, The Emancipation of the Slave, the Northern Ohio Soldiers’ Aid Society, Sanitary Commission, and Hospital Service Corps, and The End of the War.

One of a number of Stained Glass Windows as seen from inside the monument
One of a number of Stained Glass Windows as seen from inside the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument
Another of the Stained Glass Windows in the monument
Another of the Stained Glass Windows in the monument
Sumoflam at the Fountain of Eternal Life
Sumoflam at the Fountain of Eternal Life

Just a couple of blocks from there is the Peace Memorial Statue. Better known as the Fountain of Eternal Life, and sometimes also called the War Memorial Fountain and Peace Arising from the Flames of War, this statue and fountain was designed by Cleveland Institute of Art graduate Marshall Fredericks and dedicated on May 30, 1964. The sculpture, which honors Cleveland residents who served, died, or were declared missing in military service, is situated on Veterans’ Memorial Plaza as part of the Cleveland Mall. The centerpiece is a 35-foot tall bronze figure representing a man escaping from the flames of war and reaching skyward for eternal peace. The bronze sphere from which the figure rises represents Earth. There are also four granite carvings, each representing the geographic civilizations of the world and these are placed around the sphere. The entire structure, including the base, is about 46 feet tall which ranks it as one of America’s 50 tallest statues.

Cleveland's Fountain of Eternal Life
Cleveland’s Fountain of Eternal Life
Another view of Cleveland's War Memorial Fountain
Another view of Cleveland’s War Memorial Fountain
A portion of one of the granite carvings that surround the base of the fountain
A portion of one of the granite carvings that surround the base of the fountain
Another of the granite carvings
Another of the granite carvings
Sumoflam at the Christmas Story House in Cleveland
Sumoflam at the Christmas Story House in Cleveland

We soon left the downtown area to make our way to the neighborhood of another iconic, yet quirky, location. The 1983 movie “A Christmas Story” was filmed in Cleveland and they now have created a gift store (see their website HERE), turned the house into a memorial, and the famous leg lamp is shown prominently throughout. Some of the old cars that were in the movie and other things are all in the store and it was a lot of fun to go visit a site of a movie that I watched with my children in the 1980s and now with my grandchildren.  A Christmas Story is certainly one of those classic Christmas movies for the family.

Leg Lamp from A Christmas Story. Now anyone can get one!
Leg Lamp from A Christmas Story. Now anyone can get one!
The Famed Red Ryeder bb gun -- you'll shoot your eye out!!
The Famed Red Ryder BB gun — you’ll shoot your eye out!!
A view of the inside of the A Christmas Story Gift Shop
A view of the inside of the A Christmas Story Gift Shop
The House from the 1983 movie A Christmas Story
The House from the 1983 movie A Christmas Story
Cleveland's Playhouse Square Chandelier
Cleveland’s Playhouse Square Chandelier

To continue the “quirky” stops, we next visited Cleveland’s Theater District, known also as Playhouse Square, to visit the “World’s Largest Outdoor Chandelier” which adorns the corner of 14th Avenue and Euclid.  The chandelier is 20 feet tall and has 4,200 crystals (actually made from acrylic resin)  on it.  Playhouse Square is considered the largest performing arts center in the United States outside of New York. The entire square looks like a fun place to visit in the evenings when the theaters are all live and active and the chandelier is all lit up.

Cleveland's Playhouse Square
Cleveland’s Playhouse Square
Cleveland's State Theatre
Cleveland’s State Theatre
Cleveland's Ohio Theatre
Cleveland’s Ohio Theatre
Another view of Cleveland's famed Chandelier
Another view of Cleveland’s famed Chandelier
Sumoflam and the FREE Stamp in Cleveland
Sumoflam and the FREE Stamp in Cleveland

Of course, if looking for the offbeat and quirky, one cannot miss out on another Cleveland’s iconic “sculptures,” that being the giant FREE Rubber Stamp. Located in Cleveland’s Willard Park, near the Harbor and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, this large sculpture by Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen is 28 ft. 10 in. x 26 ft. x 49 ft and made of steel and aluminum.  It was commissioned in 1982 and installed in October 1991.  Oldenburg and van Bruggen are well-known for their large scale sculptures of everyday items (See a gallery of them HERE).  I had the opportunity to visit their Shuttlecocks sculptures in Kansas City in 2010 (see the link HERE).

Oldenburg and van Bruggen's FREE Stamp in Willard Park, Cleveland
Oldenburg and van Bruggen’s FREE Stamp in Willard Park, Cleveland

Throughout our travels this day, I also snapped a variety of other shots around Cleveland.  There are a few murals, some unique shopping districts, interesting storefronts and more.  Here is a small collection of scenes from Cleveland.

Old Bowling Neon Sign
Old Bowling Neon Sign
Cleveland's Steelyard Commons
Cleveland’s Steelyard Commons
Cleveland Fire Memorial
Cleveland Fire Memorial honors Cleveland Fire Fighters that died in the line of duty
Bar Louie in Cleveland
Bar Louie in Cleveland
Mural in The Flats District of Cleveland
Mural in The Flats District of Cleveland
Statue of Leif Erickson
Statue of Leif Erickson  – made by the Riverdog Foundry in Seattle and based on the statue by August Werner.  This is located in the Flats District
Rock and Roll Blvd. in Cleveland
Rock and Roll Blvd. in Cleveland
Dendrite by Olga Ziemska located in the Tremont District of Cleveland.
“Dendrite” by Olga Ziemska located in the Tremont District of Cleveland. (see more HERE)
One of many colorful guitars that can be found throughout the city
One of many colorful guitars that can be found throughout the city
Lucky's Cafe in Clevelend
Lucky’s Cafe in Cleveland
Large Mural in downtown Cleveland
Large Mural in downtown Cleveland
Key Tower (R - 947 feet) and Terminal Tower (L - 771 feet)
Key Tower (R – 947 feet) is the tallest building in Ohio and 23rd tallest in the US and Terminal Tower (L – 771 feet)
Welcome to Tremont District signs
Welcome to Tremont District signs
A portion of three murals under a bridge in Cleveland
A portion of three murals under a bridge in Cleveland
Shang Hai Trading in the Asian District of Cleveland
Shang Hai Trading in the Asian District of Cleveland
Professor Market wall advertisement...located in the Tremont District
Professor Market wall advertisement…located in the Tremont District
Statue of Swedish Botanist Carl von Linne
Statue of Swedish Botanist Carl von Linne outside the Cleveland Museum of Natural History
A Dinosaur Sighting outside the Cleveland Museum of Natural history
A Dinosaur Sighting outside the Cleveland Museum of Natural history
Professor and Jefferson in Tremont District of Cleveland
Professor and Jefferson in Tremont District of Cleveland
A nicely painted bus in the Hessler Road area of Cleveland
A nicely painted bus in the Hessler Road area of Cleveland
Progressive Field, Home of the Cleveland Indians
Progressive Field, Home of the Cleveland Indians
Unique Garbage Cans
Unique Garbage Cans
Progressive Stadium, Home of the Cleveland Indians
FirstEnergy Stadium, Home of the Cleveland Browns
Buildings of Cleveland seen behind the glass pyramid of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame
Buildings of Cleveland seen behind the glass pyramid of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame
The Garfield Memorial at Lake View Cemetery in Cleveland
The Garfield Memorial at Lake View Cemetery in Cleveland

To end the day, Tina, Jim and I stopped for a late lunch and then headed towards Little Italy again to visit the famous Lake View Cemetery – a 265 acre memorial park and also home to the 180 foot tall monument to James Garfield, the 20th President of the United States and also the Rockefeller Monument and the Wade Chapel.The Garfield Monument sits on top of a hill and at one time one could look out over all of Cleveland.  Now you need to go to the second floor balcony to catch a five-mile view of downtown Cleveland and Lake Erie.

Gargoyles on Garfield Monument
Gargoyles on Garfield Monument
Statue of Garfield
Statue of Garfield
Garfield Statue inside Garfield Monument
Garfield Statue inside Garfield Monument
Part of a larger mural on the dome of the monument
Part of a larger mural on the dome of the monument

Cleveland is a fascinating city and is certainly well worth a visit.  My next visit will include more than a couple of days as there is so much to see in this lovely city….my birthplace.

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Cleveland’s Little Italy – A Trek Back To My Birthplace

My thanks to the following for their assistance in this post: Anthony Gambatese, Nicole Laurienzo, Ray Kristosik, Nancy Phillips, Nancy Starvaggi Schaffer, Dominic Gogol and my great Laurienzo family.

Little Italy Historic District in Cleveland
Little Italy Historic District in Cleveland

Nearly 60 years ago I was born in the neighborhood known as “Little Italy” in Cleveland. I was not there for long as my mother took me and left when I was nearly 9 months old in 1957.  My first trip back there happened around 1993 or 94, and I haven’t visited but only four or five times since, and typically for one or two hours at a time as I passed through to another destination.

Murray Hill and Paul in Little Italy. I was born in the house on this corner in 1956
Murray Hill and Paul in Little Italy. I was born in the house on this corner in 1956

In mid-May 2016 I had the opportunity to visit for an extended time and get to know the neighborhood that I could’ve grown up in. I spent time with some of my half-sisters and half-brother and visited a number of businesses in the area.  I was also able research some of the history of the place of my birth.

Reflection of address on old tile floor of Murray Hill Hill Market
Reflection of address on old tile floor of Murray Hill Hill Market
Sumoflam at the place of his birth
Sumoflam at the place of his birth
My first home - 2072 Murray Hill Road, now home of the Murray Hill Market
My first home – 2072 Murray Hill Road, now home of the Murray Hill Market
Murray Hill Road, still a red brick avenue, is the name sake for the Murray Hill Neighborhood
Murray Hill Road, still a red brick avenue, is the name sake for the Murray Hill Neighborhood

This post is not really about me, but is about the neighborhood known as Murray Hill or also as “Little Italy.”  What is the neighborhood like today? What was it like 60 years ago when I was born there?  These were all questions that I had.

This is an early image of Little Italy from the 1920s
This is an early image of Little Italy from the 1920s or 1930s.  This is Mayfield Road.

The “neighborhood”, as the long-time residents call it, has been around since the late 1800s. It  is located from E. 119th to E. 125th streets on Murray Hill and Mayfield roads. Some stories say that there were 20 original Italian families that settled there and it’s one of the few “Little Italy’s” in the country where the people actually live in the neighborhood as well as have businesses there.  Some historical notes say “By the late 1890s, many Italian immigrants had settled in the Mayfield-Murray Hill area and worked in the nearby marbleworks, one of which, the Lake View Marble Works, was founded by skilled stonemason Joseph Carabelli.”  Carabelli was an Italian artisan who came to Cleveland via New York to open his sculpting and stone masonry business. His early employees developed reputations as expert stonemasons due to their contributions to monumental works at nearby Lake View Cemetery. The residential space to the south of the cemetery became occupied with numerous Italian families near the turn of the century.

Mayfield Road in 1953, a couple of years before I was born here.
Mayfield Road in 1953, a couple of years before I was born here.
Another scene of Little Italy in the 1950s
Another scene of Little Italy in the 1950s – includes Guarino;s and Mama Santa’s (see below)

In 1911 it was estimated that 96% of the inhabitants were Italian-born, and another 2% were of Italian parents. Many of these Italians were Neapolitan and were engaged in skilled lacework, garment making, and the embroidery trades. The largest group came from the towns of Ripalimosani, Matrice, and San Giovanni in Galdo, located in the Campobasso Province.  My grandparents, Carmine Laurienzo and Maria Nicola Spuzzillo migrated from Matrice. Carmine arrived on the SS Cretic from Naples in Febuary 1921 along with Angelantonio Spuzzillo. An earlier member of the Spuzzillo family had arrived in 1907.  In 1932 the Carmine (also known as “Nick”)  formed a partnership with Nicolo Spuzzillo and opened up a storefront at 2072 Murray Hill Road (where I was born) as a grocery store. It was named Lorenzo and Spuzzillo’s.

The Laurienzo store in the 1950s. My grandfather Carmine is on the right
The Laurienzo store in the 1950s. My grandfather Carmine is on the right
A look down Mayfield Road in May 2016
A look down Mayfield Road in May 2016

Today,  Little Italy is one of the few city neighborhoods attracting thousands of suburban shoppers that visit to enjoy the historical charm and the trendy, upscale art, dining, and

gracious living. In the community where the macaroni machine was invented in 1906, visitors will find the Little Italy Historical Museum, the Alta House and Library, Murray Hill School, the Holy Rosary Church, numerous restaurants, and artists’ studios and shops. In 1993 the community dedicated Tony Brush Park, named for champion boxer and Little Italy resident Anthony Brescia, at Mayfield and Random roads.

Holy Rosary Bell Tower
Holy Rosary Bell Tower

As it did in the early years, much of life in Little Italy centers around tradition.  The Feast, which is a huge celebration at the historic Holy Rosary Church, is an annual event that is in planning stages all year round. Other events center around art walks today.

The Alta House began as a nursery and Kindergarten agency for the neighborhood. Carabelli approached the agency about expanding social services to the community. By 1898, contributions from John D. Rockefeller provided programs and facilities in the name of his daughter, Alta, to serve the immigrant community assimilating to American society. Both Holy Rosary and the Alta House remain as central religious social forces in the neighborhood today.

With my sister Nicole Laurienzo, who owns the Mayfield Smoke Shop.
With my sister Nicole Laurienzo, who owns the Mayfield Smoke Shop.

Currently, my sister Nicole, carries on the family tradition in the center of Little Italy with her own store front, Mayfield Smoke Shop, which she has run for 20 years (as of 2016).

With Nicole’s kind assistance, I was able to visit a number of folks in Little Italy and “get a taste — literally” of what this historic neighborhood is all about.

I started off with her two neighbors — Guarino’s, which is the oldest restaurant in Cleveland, and Mama Santa’s, an amazing pizzeria offering a massive variety of home made pasta and pizza.

GUARINO’S

(see http://www.guarinoscleveland.com/)

Old Sidewalk plaque for Guarinp's
Old Sidewalk plaque for Guarinp’s

My first stop was a visit with Nancy Phillips, the current owner of Guarino’s. She and two of her children (Scott & Rachel) have  continued this family business and evolved the menu and atmosphere.  They have taken strident efforts to preserve the history of this Cleveland establishment for nearly a century. Many of Nancy’s seven children and fifteen grandchildren have served at the tables, poured the drinks, cleaned the dishes, and even cooked the dinners for over twenty years since she took over.

Guarino's sign in 1964
Guarino’s sign in 1964

Guarino’s Restaurant is generally recognized as Cleveland’s oldest restaurant. They have been open since 1918 and have never closed, never drastically remodeled, and never changed their commitment to high-quality Italian-American dining at affordable prices.  It has stayed in the family, which has kept Cleveland’s oldest restaurant cooking for nearly a century.

Guarino's patio deck in 1966
Guarino’s patio deck in 1966

Founded as a speakeasy during the prohibition era, Vincenzo Guarino used to serve liquor in coffee cups along Mayfield Road, and his wife affectionately referred to as “Mama Guarino” did all the cooking in the basement kitchen- which still exists today. The family lived upstairs and in the rear of the building, which although is now fully occupied for the uses of the restaurant, still strongly resembles home.

Old rustic stairway down to the decades old basement kitchen
Old rustic stairway down to the decades old basement kitchen
Guarino's Basement Kitchen ca 2016
Guarino’s Basement Kitchen ca 2016
Sumoflam in Guarino's kitchen. The oven behind me has been used for over 90 years.
Sumoflam in Guarino’s kitchen. The stove behind me has been used for decades.

On my visit to Guarino’s I was fortunate enough to go down to the basement kitchen, which is still in use.  I could barely stand up straight.  It amazes me that this kitchen has been used longer than I have been alive.

Mama Guarino making pasta in the kitchen
Mama Guarino making pasta in the kitchen

In the early 1900s, when Mayfield was a much less traveled road, the story goes that Vincenzo Guarino left his native Sicily to seek his fortune in America in this newly settled Italian neighborhood of Cleveland. Within just a few years, he realized his dream of a business of his own, a tavern and pool room, serving food. It was patronized by the brigands of the times as well as professors and musicians from the nearby cultural and educational institutions. During prohibition, he served liquor in coffee cups to the elite of Cleveland, while his mother-in-law had a thriving wine business on the next street.

Some of the old grapevines that were originally brought from Italy and planted by Mama Guarino.
Some of the old grapevines that were originally brought from Italy and planted by Mama Guarino.
Outdoor patio seating under the decades old grapevines at Guarino's
Outdoor patio seating under the decades old grapevines at Guarino’s

Vincenzo had actually brought grape vines with him from Italy and planted them in the patio area behind the old bar.  These are still growing and have spread across much of the outside garden dining area in the back of the restaurant.

Cozy waiting area at Guarino's
Cozy waiting area at Guarino’s
Fine dining at Guarino's
Fine dining indoors at Guarino’s

After Vincenzo’s marriage to Mama Guarino, they began to serve more and more food, and in turn became a full restaurant and bar. He turned the apartment above the restaurant into the family home which became an elegant fifties townhouse housing three generations of Guarino’s. The comfortable garden dining area opened in 1959 and still holds the trumpet vines and grape vines he brought from Italy.

Full Bar at Guarino's
Full Bar at Guarino’s
Comfortable Decor at Guarino's
Comfortable Decor at Guarino’s
Poster in Guarino's honoring Jim Guarino
Poster in Guarino’s by Jim Guarino
A painting by a local artisit of the Guarino's Store front.
A painting by a local artist of the Guarino’s Store front.

In 1954, after Vincenzo’s death, his only son Sam decided to carry on the family business. In 1963, Sam decorated Guarino’s as it is now, in the Victorian era with antiques, special wallpaper, etc. After Mama Guarino and Sam passed away, Marilyn (Sam’s wife) and Nancy Phillips (a close family friend) took over the business in 1988. They remodeled the upstairs townhouse into an elegant dining room with early Victorian decor. The Victorian Parlours, as they have been named, can seat up to fifty people and have been the location of many rehearsal dinners, company banquets, and various parties.

Alley relaxation area on the side of Guarino's
Alley relaxation area on the side of Guarino’s

Mama Santa’s

http://mamasantas.com/

Mama Santa's Pizzeria Restaurant in Little Italy
Mama Santa’s Pizzeria Restaurant in Little Italy
Mamma Santa sign ca. 1960s
Mamma Santa sign ca. 1960s

Just two doors down from Guarino’s (next to the Mayfield Smoke Shop), is Mama Santa’s Pizzeria and casual Italian Restaurant.  It is one of the only places in Cleveland that still makes their pasta, pizza dough and sauces from scratch, not to mention their sausages and other items. Almost everything on the menu is home made (and in some cases even home grown!)

Mama Santa
Mamma Santa

Mama Santa’s was established by Guido and Nancy Scaffidi July 25, 1961. Before launching the restaurant, Guido worked as an auto body repair man and Nancy as a hair dresser. Guido served in World War II and was a prisoner of war. Shortly after World War II, Guido and Nancy emigrated from Gioiosa Marea, Sicily and settled in Akron before moving to Cleveland’s Little Italy. The restaurant is named in honor of Nancy’s mother, Santa Ignazzito, who was born on All Saints Day, November 1, 1908. Santa used her recipes straight from Sicily to create the authentic Sicilian menu.

Sumoflam with Mama Santa's owner Papa Tio
Sumoflam with Mama Santa’s owner Papa Tio Starvaggi

Mama Santa’s has been in the same location since its inception. The building is more than 100 years old and was used as a bank, clothing store and a cafe before ultimately becoming Mama Santa’s.

 

Home Made Pizza Dough rising at Mama Santa's
Home Made Pizza Dough rising at Mama Santa’s
Sumoflam with Nancy Starvaggi Schaffer, showing off the AMAZING homemade sausage and pasta
Sumoflam with Nancy Starvaggi Schaffer, showing off the AMAZING homemade sausage and pasta

Guido and Nancy’s sons, Anthony and Danny, began working at the restaurant as teenagers. They have overseen the daily operation of the restaurant since Guido retired in 1996. Today, the restaurant remains a family operation; Anthony’s wife Pina and her Sicilian friend Angela make all of the homemade pastas, sauces, and dough for the restaurant daily.  Anthony’s four children all work at the restaurant — daughter Nancy manages the business today.

Mama Santa's has a full menu of mouth-watering delectable HOME MADE Italian food.
Mama Santa’s has a full menu of mouth-watering delectable HOME MADE Italian food.

I was sent over to Mama Santa’s by my sister Nicole, who runs the Mayfield Smokeshop next door.  We had just inhaled a large homemade pizza from them about an hour earlier and I had to wait for the lunch rush to get over to speak with Nancy Starvaggi Schaffer, the daughter of Tio and Pina.  Nancy basically runs the business now while Tio directs the customers and Pina makes her amazing homemade pastas, sauces, meatballs and sausages.  I was told that I absolutely had to try out their home made pasta, so I was excited for the opportunity.  Little did I know what I was in for!!

imageNancy ushered me to a table and told me they would bring me a “sampler” of some of their items.  I was envisioning a large plate with three or four items to taste test. Boy was I wrong.

 

Mama Pina making her homemade pasta (courtesy of Mama Santa's Facebook)
Mama Pina making her homemade pasta (courtesy of Mama Santa’s Facebook)
Mama Santa's pizza includes homemade sausage, sauce and dough. Doesn't get much better.
Mama Santa’s pizza includes homemade sausage, sauce and dough. Doesn’t get much better.

Soon Mama Pina was at the table to tell me about her trip from Sicily to Cleveland.  She had learned all of her skills growing up in Sicily and brought her talents with her (along with some local seeds for her home garden).  As she spoke the “Sampler” began arriving…plate after plate…with practically full portions of their “Spaghetti di Casa” (their famous homemade thick spaghetti pasta noodles), cheese ravioli, meat ravioli, white clam sauce on pasta, fettucine alfredo, homemade sausage on spaghetti and more.  It was all I could do to not be rude and stuff myself with the ABSOLUTE BEST Italian food I had ever had in my nearly 60 year life (no kidding..really).  Then, Mama Pina said she had to go turn over her meatballs and would be right back.

Let your eyes force your mouth to water folks…..

Home made Italian Sausage and home made pasta
Home made Italian Sausage and home made pasta
Penne pasta with homemade Clam Sauce - WOWZERS
Penne pasta with homemade Clam Sauce – WOWZERS
Home made ravioli with a homemade sauce that was breathtaking
Home made ravioli with a homemade sauce that was breathtaking
Homemade pasta with homemade pesto sauce
Homemade pasta with homemade pesto sauce
Homemade fettucine - pasta and sauce. Mouthwatering and heart warming
Homemade fettucine – pasta and sauce. Mouthwatering and heart warming

As if the seven sampler plates were not enough, Mama Pina was next walking out with a sampler of her homemade meatballs with her secret ingredient…  As I tried to find a place to put it and a way to deal with all of the tantalizing tastes rolling over my tongue, Pina explained to me that she adds her own home grown herbs into her food and, in her meatballs she adds some wild anise from her garden.  The wild anise came from seeds that she had brought from her village in Sicily when she came to the United States.  So, in essence, I was getting the authentic tastes from her faraway Sicilian village right there in Cleveland.  And I had never had anise in meatballs. WOW!

Homemade Meatballs infused with Sicilian bred wild anise
Homemade Meatballs infused with Sicilian bred wild anise – yummiferous
Mama Santa's Tiramisu
Mama Santa’s Tiramisu

I was full to my toes and fingertips (remember, I had also had some of their pizza just a couple of hours earlier).  But then I hear Mama Tia speak in Italian to her daughter Nancy, and I understood her telling her to bring me some of their Tiramisu.  I tried to be nice and say no…that I was sooooo full form their “sampler.”  But Mama Tia, in her sweet Italian way, would not say no.  Soon I was handed a plate of a small portion (thank goodness) of their dangerously delectable Tiramisu.  I found a way to get it in me….smooth, creamy and chocolatey.

Mama Santa's is cozy
Mama Santa’s is cozy

The owners and staff are proud of their wonderful little restaurant.   The neighborhood is as well.  The place is typically packed with lines out the doors.

I don’t think I have ever been as full as I was after leaving the wonderful atmosphere of Mama Santa’s.   But before I left I got to visit the backroom a bit.  Unfortunately, it was not homemade pasta day.  They do that on Mondays.

The old reliable dough mixer at Mama Santa's has been around for decades apparently
The old reliable dough mixer at Mama Santa’s has been around for decades apparently.  Nancy was proud of this reliable device.
Mama Santa's atmosphere is made all the better with the hand painted murals on the walls
Mama Santa’s atmosphere is made all the better with the hand painted murals on the walls

If you get anywhere near Cleveland, you must make your way to Little Italy just to try Mama Pina’s homemade pasta!

Mayfield Smoke Shop

http://mayfieldsmokeshop.com/

mayfield1

Mayfield Smoke Shop in Little Italy
Mayfield Smoke Shop in Little Italy (photo courtesy of Mayfield Smoke Shop)

Nestled between Guarino’s and Mama Santa’s is my sister’s Mayfield Smoke Shop.  Admittedly, I don’t smoke anything but turkeys on my Big Green Egg grill at Thanksgiving.  Though some of the best food is just a couple of doors down, I discovered on this trip that the neighborhood gathering spot is at the smoke shop.  One of only a few places in all of Cleveland that sells cigars and other tobacco products, it is perhaps one of the most well known and visited. There is a back room for neighborhood folks to gather and chat and play cards.  There are comfy seats in the shop to sit and relax (which I did for a couple of hours just to see the constant flow of people form both inside and outside the neighborhood.

With sister Nicole (R) and "adopted sister" Michelle (L) who assists at the shop
With sister Nicole (R) and “adopted sister” Michelle (L) who assists at the shop

My half sister Nicole Laurienzo has been the proprietor of this shop for 20 years.  She is a mainstay of the neighborhood and provides her loyal customers (hundreds, if not thousands, of them) the tobacco products they need along with the only spot in Little Italy to carry lottery tickets, candy, energy drinks, sodas and a few other things. But, more than all of these items, Nicole provides a smile to all of her visitors and many come, sit a while indoors or out and chat, share information, tell stories of the neighborhood, tell jokes, talk politics and more.

The Mayfield Smoke Shop is an inviting place...a gathering place for all. (Photo courtesy of Mayfield Smoke Shop)
The Mayfield Smoke Shop is an inviting place…a gathering place for all. (Photo courtesy of Mayfield Smoke Shop)
Mayfield Smoke Shop carries dozens and dozens of varieties of cigars
Mayfield Smoke Shop carries dozens and dozens of varieties of cigars
Mayfield's offers an old Cigar Store Chief, among other unique things to see
Mayfield’s offers an old Cigar Store Chief, among other unique things to see

Even if you don’t smoke, if you are in Little Italy, please drop in and say hi to Nicole.  Tell her Sumoflam sent you!

TOLI – Tavern of Little Italy

tavernoflittleitaly.com

TOLI on Mayfield Rd.
TOLI on Mayfield Rd.

My sister Nicole also sent me down to one of the newer spots in Little Italy – the Tavern of Little Italy, also known as TOLI.  I am not a drinker, but I heard they have good eats and that the owner Dominic Gogol is one of the nicest guys in the neighborhood.  So, I meandered my way down to visit Dominic and check out TOLI.

Visiting with Dominic Gogol of TOLI
Visiting with Dominic Gogol of TOLI
Though small, TOLI is big on taste, brew and personality
Though small, TOLI is big on taste, brew and personality

The story of TOLI began when a group of friends decided to bring something new to the historic neighborhood.  Some deep-rooted, others newly-planted, together they created a hard to define tavern where red wine meets 14 taps of craft beer – where meatballs meet fish tacos.  The time, sweat and talent “from the hands of many” gutted, built and renovated a 100-year old home that is now the Tavern of Little Italy.  A 30-foot bar, surrounded by rustic design, creates an air of familiar comfort.

Hand built walls add to the personality of TOLI
Hand built walls add to the personality of TOLI

Before I got to talk to Dominic, I was told to make sure to catch the restroom…a totally unique experience.  You can read the walls…and the history of Little Italy on the walls.

TOLI Restroom and the history of Little Italy
TOLI Restroom and the history of Little Italy

 

Busy in the TOLI Kitchen
Busy in the TOLI Kitchen

On the food front, TOLI is more than a neighborhood bar.  Its kitchen is dedicated to local fresh and imaginative cuisine.  Its beer selection, both on tap and bottled, has been carefully selected with the hope of offering both diversity and established flavors.

TOLI features multiple, high-definition big screen TV’s for faithful Cleveland sports fans.  A private dining room is available for groups of 50 and under.  There are also three different outdoor eating spaces, from sidewalk to alley to back patio.  TOLI is located in the heart of Cleveland Little Italy, where Murray Hill Road meets Mayfield Road – “the top of the T”.

View of the T - where Murray Hill Rd and Mayfield Road meet -- as seen from TOLI
View of the T – where Murray Hill Rd and Mayfield Road meet — as seen from TOLI

Other sights from around the neighborhood

I only had half a day to really visit with folks from the neighborhood.  But, I spent the morning walking around capturing photos to bring a feel of Little Italy.  Following are a few more shots from my visit to this wonderful place I call my birthplace.

Italian Bakeries

Corbo's Bakery
Corbo’s Bakery

Honestly, there are not many sinfully delightful treats than an homemade cannoli.  Little Italy has a couple of places that compete for the best including Corbo’s Bakery and Presti’s Bakery. I have tried both and they are too close to call!

Presti's Bakery, Little Italy
Presti’s Bakery, Little Italy
Corbo's Bakery, Little Italy
Corbo’s Bakery, Little Italy
Italian Yumminess in the case at Presti's
Italian Yumminess in the case at Presti’s
Sweet goodies
Sweet goodies

Other Eateries

La Dolce Vita, Little Italy
La Dolce Vita, Little Italy
Trattoria on the Hill, Little Italy
Trattoria on the Hill, Little Italy
Murray Hill Market, Little Italy - located in the house I was born in on Murray Hill Road
Murray Hill Market, Little Italy – located in the house I was born in on Murray Hill Road

Other Sites in Little Italy

Old Church on Murray Hill Road
Old Church on Murray Hill Road
Victorian Rooftops in Little Italy
Victorian Rooftops in Little Italy
Christopher Columbus in Brush Park
Christopher Columbus in Brush Park
Random Road
Random Road
Old Hotel Front - The Mayfield
Old Hotel Front – The Mayfield
One of the Statues on top of the Holy Rosary Church in Little Italy
One of the Statues on top of the Holy Rosary Church in Little Italy
Tratorria Mural Little Italy
Tratorria Mural Little Italy
Old Mayfield Theatre, now closed
Old Mayfield Theatre, now closed
Maydfield Theatre in 2009
Mayfield Theatre in 2009
Inscribed Plaque on old church on Murray Hill Road
Inscribed Plaque on old church on Murray Hill Road
More Statues on Holy Rosary Church in Little Italy
More Statues on Holy Rosary Church in Little Italy

 

 

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