Ohio’s Amish Country – Holmes County, OH

Holmes County Trail, Ohio
Holmes County Trail, Ohio

We took a road trip to Holmes County, OH in late July 2016 for Julianne to ride the Holmes County Bike Trail and the Mohican Valley Bike Trail.  (I will have Bike Trail posts about both of these coming soon)

While she rode, I visited a few of the places in the area.  I had visited the area in 2008, including the town of Charm.  (See my post HERE) In another trip in the early 2000s, we had also visited the unique town of Berlin.  I never did a post about the town and hope to make it there again sometime in the future.  On this particular visit, we didn’t make it to that part of Holmes County.  Rather, we focused on the towns surrounding the bike trails, beginning with Fredericksburg, OH and ending in Danville, OH.

Holmes County Trail map - Fredericksburg to Holmesville, OH
Holmes County Trail map – Fredericksburg to Holmesville, OH

DSC_7150We took the five hour drive to Fredericksburg, OH, a small community of a little over 400 people.  This is where the Holmes County trail begins at the northern end. I dropped Julianne off at the trailhead, which is located right near the town park.

Fredericksburg Town Limit
Fredericksburg Town Limit

DSC_7162Fredericksburg is home to two factories, Mrs. Miller’s Homemade Noodles and Robin Industries. Mrs. Miller’s Homemade Noodles specializes in various kinds of pasta as well as jams and jellies distributed throughout the United States.  I saw three different facilities while driving around the town.

An Amish buggy takes on a Mustang on a road in Fredericksburg
An Amish buggy takes on a Mustang on a road in Fredericksburg
An Amish buggy "speeds" along a road near Fredericksburg, OH
An Amish buggy “speeds” along a road near Fredericksburg, OH

It is also a town frequented by the Amish and one can see their buggies around the town.

The town and surrounding area features Amish furniture shops, Amish cheese shops, and even a working blacksmith shop.  (See shop list HERE) There is apparently a car wash that can also be used for the buggies.

The Fredericksburg Library is located in an old building
The Fredericksburg Library is located in an old building
Main Street Fredericksburg, OH
Main Street Fredericksburg, OH
Welcome to Holmesville, OH
Welcome to Holmesville, OH

From Fredericksburg, I drove south on OH County Road 192 to Holmesville which was the next town along the trail.

The drive to Holmesville went along some lovely cornfields and other farmland. The roadside was dotted with sunflower fields and wildflowers as well.

Parrot Farms surrounding by large corn fields
Parrot Farms surrounding by large corn fields
Sunflower Fields on the side of OH 192 between Fredericksburg and Holmesville
Sunflower Fields on the side of OH  CR 192 between Fredericksburg and Holmesville
Sharing the Trail...buggies to the left and bikes to the right.
Sharing the Trail…buggies to the left and bikes to the right.

The Holmes County Trail is a unique bike trail in that bikers share the trail with Amish Buggies.  The trails have signage for both and there were instances during the day where I saw both bikes and buggies.

The trail runs along some beautiful farmland (as did my drive). It made for a nice scenic ride for Julianne.

A bridge scene of the Holmes County Trail near Homlmesville
A bridge scene of the Holmes County Trail near Holmesville
Map of trail from Holmesville to Millersburg
Map of trail from Holmesville to Millersburg
Welcome to Millersburg
Welcome to Millersburg

The next section of drive is along Ohio Highway 83 which goes to the larger town of Millersburg, OH, which is in the heart of Ohio’s Amish Country.  There are many shops here and the town is just a few minutes west of Berlin. When I visited Berlin a few years ago, we visited the large Heini’s Cheese Chalet, but I had never written a post about it.  Though I didn’t visit it on this trip (its address is in Millersburg, but it is actually closer to Berlin), here are a few photos from my visit in 2011.

Welcome to Heini's - taken on a trip to Holmes County in 2011
Welcome to Heini’s – taken on a trip to Holmes County in 2011
Old milk cans used to bring the milk in to make the cheese
Old milk cans used to bring the milk in to make the cheese
An old Amish man relaxes in Hein's - taken in July 2011
An old Amish man relaxes in Heini’s – taken in July 2011
Large mural on Heini's
Large mural on Heini’s
One of a number of Stained Glass pieces in Heini's - taken in July 2011
One of a number of Stained Glass pieces in Heini’s – taken in July 2011
A large cheese mural located in Heini's Cheese Chalet - taken in July 2011
A large cheese mural located in Heini’s Cheese Chalet – taken in July 2011
All kinds of cheeses can be found in Heini's and they'll gladly cut the cheese for you.
All kinds of cheeses can be found in Heini’s and they’ll gladly cut the cheese for you.
Welcome to Hipp Station in Millersburg
Welcome to Hipp Station in Millersburg

Millersburg is also home to Hipp Station, the main information center for the Holmes County Trail.   It houses the Millersburg Depot which contains a shop, information, refreshments, etc.

There are nice benches to relax and, as it is right on the bike trail, it is a good place to look at the  bikers and buggies ride by.

Millersburg Depot
Millersburg Depot/Hipp Station on Holmes County Trail
Trail Sign in Millersburg, OH
Trail Sign in Millersburg, OH
Holmes County Trail in Millersburg, OH
Holmes County Trail in Millersburg, OH
Downtown Millersburg, OH in the heart of Amish Country
Downtown Millersburg, OH in the heart of Amish Country

A drive through Millersburg also provides a look at some old fashioned signs from the past.  Its a quaint little town and there are even a few fun surprises!

I had fun seeing the old 70’s style Laundromat sign and the old 7 UP sign.

Old Laundromat Sign, Millersburg, OH
Old Laundromat Sign, Millersburg, OH
7 Up sign at Elks building in Millersburg, OH
7 Up sign at Elks building in Millersburg, OH

And then there is the fun surprise….Millersburg is a place where the streets (at least one of them) have No Name!

No Name St. in Millersburg, OH. Now THAT is a unique road name
No Name St. in Millersburg, OH. Now THAT is a unique road name
Holmes Country Trail Map 3
Map of trail from Millersburg to Killbuck
Killbuck Depot on the Holmes County Trail
Killbuck Depot on the Holmes County Trail

The final rideable section of the Holmes County Trail takes riders from Millersburg to the village of Killbuck, ending at the old Killbuck Depot on Main Street (OH County Road 622).  Basically, I drove down US Route 62 (the Amish Country Byway) from Millersburg to the CR 622 turnoff. Its a nice drive and Killbuck is in a nice region of the county.

Welcome to Killbuck
Welcome to Killbuck

Julianne was fortunate to get into Killbuck just as a heavy duty thunderstorm emerged.  We got her into the car dry as the deluge hit.

Here comes the deluge. We saw this on our way to Brinkhaven.
Here comes the deluge. We saw this on our way to Brinkhaven.
Welcome to Glenmont, OH
Welcome to Glenmont, OH

The Holmes County Trail from Killbuck to Glenmont is closed, so Julianne’s bike was loaded and we headed to Brinkhaven (via Glenmont), which is the beginning of the Mohican Valley Bike Trail and also home to the “Bridge of Dreams,” the second longest covered bridge in Ohio.  I dropped Julianne off at the paved beginning of the trail near a tunnel that goes under US 62.

Mohican Valley Trail tunnel at the Brinkhaven trailhead
Mohican Valley Trail tunnel at the Brinkhaven trailhead
Welcome to Brinkhaven
Welcome to Brinkhaven

As Julianne rode down the trail, I returned to US 62 to head to the “Bridge of Dreams.”  Just near the tunnel is one of the iconic Mail Pouch Barns.  Many of these barns emblazoned with a Mail Pouch ad dot the southeast.

Mail Pouch Barn in Brinkhaven, OH
Mail Pouch Barn in Brinkhaven, OH
Mohican Valley Trail
Mohican Valley Trail

The Mohican Valley Trail is only a 4.5 mile stretch of bike trail that links the Kokosing Gap Trail (a 14.5 mile trail from Danville, OH to Mt. Vernon, OH) and the Holmes County Trail (currently connects to the primitive portion of the trail at the tunnel above).

The Mohican Valley Trail basically runs from Brinkhave, OH to Danville, OH.  Its major feature, as noted above, is the 370 foot long “Bridge of Dreams.” This classic covered bridge is of interest to all and is easily accessible by car visitors as well.

The 370 foot long Bridge of Dreams over the Mohican River near Brinkhaven.
The 370 foot long Bridge of Dreams over the Mohican River near Brinkhaven

DSC_7212The Bridge of Dreams was originally built in the 1920s as a railroad bridge, and covered in 1998. It is the second longest covered bridge in Ohio after the Smolen–Gulf Bridge over the Ashtabula River in NE Ohio (which I visited a couple of months before it opened in 2008 – see my photo HERE), and third longest covered bridge in the United States. The bridge is closed to motorized traffic but is often used by Amish buggies.

Mohican Valley Trail Map
Mohican Valley Trail Map
The Bridge of Dreams as seen from the Mohican River
The Bridge of Dreams as seen from the Mohican River
An Amish Buggy parked by the Mohican River while the Amish youth who brought it in were out swimming
An Amish Buggy parked by the Mohican River while the Amish youth who brought it in were out swimming
Amish Buggy on Mohican Valley Trail near Danville, OH
Amish Buggy on Mohican Valley Trail near Danville, OH
A Giant Adirondack Chair at an Amish Furniture place inear Danville, OH
A Giant Adirondack Chair at an Amish Furniture place inear Danville, OH

 

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Sumoflam’s Guide to Planning an Offbeat Road Trip




Learn How to Get there
Learn How to Get There

I love to travel the back roads of America. I also love to see Offbeat Attractions. Of course, I must drop by those strange named towns (see photo above). But, I also want to visit historical sites, National Parks, scenic locations, covered bridges and more that may be along the way. So, in this post I will lay out the “Sumoflam Guide” and the process I go about in planning almost all of my trips. Hopefully, you as the readers will be able to glean some helpful information in your plans and do as I do…..ENJOY THE RIDE!

WHERE DO WE WANT TO GO?

Where Are We Going? (This sign in Millersburg, Ohio)
Where Are We Going? (This is in Millersburg, Ohio)

For the purpose of this particular guide, I am going to create a sample trip from St. Louis to Kansas City and back. My approach to this trip will begin at the St. Louis Arch and end up back there with very little back tracking along the way. Further, for simplicity, I will plan this as a four day round trip.

THE PLANNING “TOOLS”

Know Your Directions (Florence, Oregon)
Know Your Directions (Florence, Oregon)

Before I ever take off on a trip, I first get out the “tools” of the trade and begin mapping out a course.

  • First and foremost I go to Google Maps. This helps me see the general course I will be taking. It will allow me to hone in on probable routes, preferably off of the Interstates and perhaps even on county roads, if time allows. Obviously, my goal is NOT to take the fastest or most direct route, but to take the one that provides me the greatest mix of places to visit, sites to see and photographs to take.
  • After determining probable routes, I then go to my handy-dandy OFFBEAT ATTRACTION site – Roadside America – for the ultimate guide to the best offbeat attractions in my route area. I will provide details on this later on below.
  • There are a number of other reference sites I may visit depending on the routes and locations. I will list a number of my favorites later in this post. They include websites that cover the quirky, the offbeat, the giant/big things, National Parks and Monuments, historic sites, etc.
  • Finally, since there will likely be hotel stays along the way, I typically go to my favorite site for hotels, which is Choice Hotels. Since I am a “Choice Privileges” member, I gain points and free nights by staying in their hotel brands whenever possible. But, there are many other sites out there, so choose your favorites.
  • After mapping things out, I glean information about towns from Google and Bing. I may do a search on a town or an offbeat site to get more information, look at images, etc.
  • For many towns I may also do a search in Wikipedia. This is a great source of detailed information
  • Finally, after searching through all of those, I find my way to the numerous town websites, tourist sites, chamber of commerce sites, etc.

Isn’t the World Wide Web Wonderful?

MAPPING OUT THE ROUTE

ROAD TRIP!
ROAD TRIP!

Google Maps is an amazing tool and it is also fun. With their Street View program you can practically take a virtual trip to anywhere — from the comfort of your home. Of course, there is really nothing like being there in person.

Google now has a new version of Google Maps, which has some nice features. But, I prefer the Classic Maps version chiefly because I can include multiple destinations. Returning to the sample trip from St. Louis to Kansas City, this is what the initial search would give me on Google Maps:

GoogleMap1
New Google Maps – St. Louis to Kansas City

On the map above you can see that I mapped a trip from the Gateway Arch in St. Louis to the Nelson-Atkins Museum in Kansas City. It provided me with two driving routes — one direct down the Interstate and another quite a bit out of the way (if you are wanting a direct route). However, if I wanted to map an intermediate destination, I would not be able to include it and also include Kansas City. So, I will use the “Classic Maps” version by going to the settings in the upper right corner and select Classic Maps.

Switch to Classic Maps
Switch to Classic Maps

The best part of the Classic Maps view is the multiple destination selection option. With this option you can select up to 25 locations for Google to map out and create a route.

Multiple Destination Selector
Multiple Destination Selector

Following is what I used to create the ROAD TRIP! shot above:

Multiple Destination Options
Multiple Destination Options

After selecting the main destinations – in this case, St. Louis to Kansas City, it is time to dig deeper and find those offbeat attractions and other places of interest and then plug them into Google Maps.

NOW THE FUN BEGINS – FINDING THE PLACES ON THE ROAD

RABannerThe guys at Roadside America are phenomenal. They offer maps, directions and tourist attraction details as a convenience to their users. As they say it on their website – “RoadsideAmerica.com is a caramel-coated-nutbag-full of odd and hilarious travel destinations — over 10,000 places in the USA and Canada — ready for exploration.” I should note that any content from Roadside America used on my site is done so with the written permission of Roadside America. The wonderful thing about their site is that they take hundreds of user submitted photos and details and include them on the site. It is THE Honey Hole of Offbeat Travel!! If you have never visited them, check out their About Page and learn all about the great work that Doug, Ken and Mike have compiled over the years.

Roadside America Maps
Roadside America Maps

The next step in a fine back road trip is finding the unique places. The first stop should ALWAYS be Roadside America. Once on their site, click on the “Maps” link as shown above. You will get to the Roadside America Maps Page as shown below.

Roadside America Map Page
Roadside America Map Page

Since we are doing a Missouri Trip, you would click on the Missouri part of the Map (or select the state on the left hand list). This will bring up the Roadside America Missouri Page.

Roadside America Missouri page
Roadside America Missouri page

On each state page there is a ton of information….best sites, oddities, etc. There is also a small link to the Missouri Offbeat Attractions Map. Click that link and you will get the map below:

Roadside America Missouri Attractions Map
Roadside America Missouri Attractions Map

Each red pin on the map represents a unique site which you can refer to in conjunction with you Google Map trip plan. There is also an alphabetic list (based on town name) on the left side of the map. For convenience, I have circled the area from St. Louis to Kansas City to provide an idea of how many attractions there are. Bear in mind that these are predominantly the Offbeat Attractions and may not include historical museums and sites, national and state parks, scenic locations, etc.

Roadside America Map of downtown St. Louis
Roadside America Map of downtown St. Louis

When you open a state map, you can mouse over a section and double-click and the map will zoom in (it uses Google Maps technology). this will provide you with a closeup view of the area and the related pins. Click on a pin and it will pop up the Offbeat Attraction for that pin. Each attraction also has a “More” link, which, when clicked, will open up the page with details on that specific attraction. There are over 10,000 of these pages on the Roadside America site.

A typical Roadside America Attraction Page
A typical Roadside America Attraction Page

By viewing the attractions page you can find out where it is, see photos of the site, get other visitor’s comments and also see a site rating to let you know if it is “Well Worth the Visit” or just a site that may be of interest.

Roadside America iPhone app
Roadside America       iPhone app

And, while on the road, you can use the amazing Roadside America app for your iPhone.  It even has a GPS locator and will tell you the sites closest to your location on the road.  A must have for the back roads offbeat traveler!!

HONING DOWN THE ADVENTURE

Which Way Do I Go?
Which Way Do I Go?

Since the St. Louis to Kansas City trip will be a four day round trip, I typically will create a more detailed plan for each day. Since I can get actual addresses of sites along the way from Roadside America, Google and other sites, I can actually plug those into the Google Map directory. So, I will add the numerous sites from day one…initially with the sites from Roadside America. Then I will take my next step, based on those sites, and see if there are other sites of interest along the way, such as scenic views, state or National Parks, etc.

Sample Trip Day 1
Sample Trip Day 1

While adding these sites, I also create a document with the names of the places in their order. You can see from the map above that a number of places were selected in the St. Louis area. All of the locations on this map are just from Roadside America. Since Chillicothe will be the end point for the day, I will then fill in the blanks for other interesting sites along the way… As I look at the route, the following towns pop up along the way… St. Charles, St. Peters, Wentzville, Foristell, Wright City, Warrenton, Jonesburg, High Hill, New Florence, Danville, Williamsburg…and many more. I also notice that for a good part of the way I can go down Old U.S. 40 (called Booneslick Rd along part of the way and Old US 40 as well.) To me, this would be my option rather than the interstate, though, at many points it may parallel the interstate. When I hit Danville, it veers away onto some county roads, but returns to Old US 40 in Williamsburg. I will follow these roads until I hit US 54 which heads north at Kingdom City (which is an interesting place to visit by the way!!)

Kingdom City Water Tower
Kingdom City Water Tower

US 54 heads north to Mexico, Missouri, but veers off just south and turns into Missouri 22 before it goes into Mexico.  So, basically, all towns along that route are game for my search for interesting places.

GETTING TOWN INFORMATION

Mexico, Missouri
Mexico, Missouri

Perhaps one of my more unique methods of finding interesting places on the route is by using Google Maps, Google Search, Google Images, Wikipedia and miscellaneous town websites in combination.  It is almost like taking a virtual trip before I ever get on the road.  And I typically plan to hit more spots than I am actually able, but it really provides for some flexibility and it is fun.  Part of the reason for the flexibility is that you never know what you will see along the way that was unplanned.

Google Images for Mexico, Missouri
Google Images for Mexico, Missouri

Since it is halfway on the route, I randomly selected Mexico, Missouri to provide an example of how I go about finding places.  I have never been to Mexico and so, as I write this, I have no idea if there is anything of interest in this small central Missouri town.  My first step is a Google Search and then I switch over to images, some of which are above.  I didn’t really see anything that struck me there, so I went back to Google and found a website for Mexico, Missouri.  When I hit that page I immediately discovered that there is a Statue of Liberty in downtown Mexico (see photo below).

Mexico Web Page
Mexico Web Page

There are a few Statues of Liberty dotting the U.S. and it is always fun to capture them.  Since Mexico is on the route, this is a definite stop for a photo.  On further study of the Mexico website I also learn that it is the “Firebrick Capital of the World,” and that this industry has kept the town alive.  They have a Firebrick Museum with memorabilia and other items, as well as a Firebrick walk in the front.  This too could be of interest.  Being from Lexington, KY, the “Horse Capital of the World”, I also find it interesting that one of the few Horse Museums outside of the Kentucky Horse Park is located in Mexico.  It is the American Saddlebred Horse Museum and is the oldest Saddlebred Horse Museum in the nation.  This information alone would warrant a stop in Mexico as we pass by on our roundabout trip to Kansas City.

Centralia Triceratops
Centralia Triceratops

Of course, we were going through Mexico because of one of the sites we selected from Roadside America.  In this case, it is Larry Vennard’s Outside Sculpture Park of dinosaurs and other critters.  Those of you that follow my blogs know I have visited others like this in Canada, Washington and then, of course, the famous Jurustic Park in Wisconsin. (See an entire post dedicated to “Yard Art”).  This is certainly one of my passions out on the road….seeing these.  So, on this trip, I will be stopping here!!  Then, continuing west towards Salisbury, MO, there are the Scrap Metal Grasshoppers.  This too is a likely stop along the way.

Locust Creek Covered Bridge, Missouri
Locust Creek Covered Bridge, Missouri

I also have a fascination with Covered Bridges.  I have seen dozens of these old monuments to bridge building history, so a stop at the Locust Creek Covered Bridge State Park naturally is on the agenda before I finally hit Chillicothe, Missouri for an overnight stay.  By the way, Chillicothe is the “Home of Sliced Bread.”

Of course, I also explore interesting places to eat and scenic drives…and the list goes on and on.  Hopefully, this provides a piece of my mind and thought process as I plan my road trips.  The planning is almost as fun as the trip itself!!

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