West Virginia’s Midland Trail – US Route 60 from Virginia to Charleston

During the month of May I made several trips to West Virginia to assist a friend in need.  Also, during Easter Weekend (2017) I had occasion to take my wife to northern Virginia near Shenandoah National Park and on my return started my treks along US Route 60 in West Virginia, what they refer to as the Midland Trail.   On subsequent visits, I tried to hit US 60 in the western part of the state as well.

 

A scene from along US 60 in WV
The WV State Capitol Building in Charleston

The Midland Trail crosses some of the most rugged and beautiful terrain of the Mountain State and extends for approximately 100 miles from White Sulphur Springs in the east to Charleston in the west. The trail is believed to have been originally carved into the mountains by buffalo and native peoples. In 1790, George Washington ordered the trail cleared. The trail came to be traveled by stage coaches and soldiers in the Civil War.

A scene from the drive on US 60 near Lewisburg, WV
A bridge near Lewisburg, WV

Along the route there are a number of scenic stops, some of which I had time to stop for, and others which I didn’t.  But the rugged hills of West Virginia along this route made for a scenic drive, even if I didn’t stop.

My first venture on the Midland Trail came on Easter morning as I headed home from Shenandoah National Park.   It was then that I actually decided to hop off of Interstate 64 and onto US 60.  There wasn’t much in White Sulphur Springs, so I continued on to Lewisburg.  Like White Sulphur Springs, Lewisburg is known for its sulfur springs and their curative powers.  It is also home to the immaculate and world famous Greenbrier Resort.

Lewisburg – America’s Coolest Small Town
Huge snowman in Lewisburg

To prove they are the “coolest” town, they even have a huge fiberglass snowman at one of the businesses.

I found this guy at Brabble & Shores Insulation.  It is a classic Roadside America type of thing…perfect for the silly selfie!  That alone makes this town a pretty cool place in my opinion.

Old Stone Presbyterian Church was built in 1830 in Lewisburg

Always on a quest to document old covered bridges, I came across the Herns Mill Covered Bridge, which was begun in 1879 and completed in 1884. The bridge is approximately 54 feet long and 10.6 feet wide and is open to travel.  Many renovations were made in 2000 — concrete abutments and steel I-beams, guard walls, portal timbers, a new metal roof and siding — to ensure the cover bridge’s longevity.

Sam Black Church historical Marker

From Lewisburg heading west there are a number of small towns to pass through.  My next stop on the trail was at Sam Black Church. It is one of the few towns I have encountered that actually is named after a church building.

The building was built in a classic Gothic style in 1902 and was named named in honor of Rev. Samuel Black, a circuit-riding Southern Methodist preacher. It is a small one story building with a gable roof. It features a square, open bell tower with a hipped roof.

The building was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1999.

Sam Black Church in Sam Black Church, WV
Front doors to Sam Black Church

Continuing west I came to the uniquely named town of Charmco, WV.  At 2,408′ in elevation, it is a mountain town.  It remains today as a coal mining town.  I liked the “charm” part of the name (reminded me of the Amish town of Charm, OH).  However, it turns out there is really no charm intended. The community was named for the Charleston Milling Company in 1933.

Charmco, WV Post Office

I traveled through Rainelle (and, ironically was deluged by a rainstorm so kept going).  I eventually made my way to Lookout, WV, which was supposedly named because the Native American tribes used the elevated location as a lookout point.

Lookout, WV Post Office
Fun flag in Lookout, WV

I added another unique flag to my collection of “non-flag” flags that I come across when traveling.  This one was made of stones and sat next to the Post Office parking lot.

I am always on the lookout for flags represented in other media and have found a couple of dozen in the past few years.

Then of course, there are the old retro Mom and Pop motels that can be found along an old US Highways. The Midland Trail Motel is one of these. (Route 60 is actually longer than Route 66 and has many similar features.)  A little trivia from Wikipedia: traveling 2,670 mi from southwestern Arizona to the Atlantic coast in Virginia. Despite the final “0” in its number, indicating a transcontinental designation, the 1926 route formerly ended in Springfield, Missouri, at its intersection with the major US 66. In fact, US 66 was almost given the US 60 number.

Midland Trail Motel on Route 60 in Ansted, WV

One of the most “touristy” places along the Midland Trail is found near Fayetteville, WV.  This is home to the New River Gorge and the massive New River Gorge Bridge.  This is a steel arch bridge 3,030 feet long over the New River Gorge.  I visited the bridge a couple of times in the past and so didn’t want to stop on this trip due to time constraints.

Some of the kids viewing the massive New River Gorge Bridge and New River Gorge National River in Fayetteville, WV in August 1995
A view of the New River Gorge in West Virginia taken in  August 1995
The Mystery Hole in Fayetteville, WV

Of course, where there are National Parks or National Bridges, etc., there are always the Tourist Traps.  The “Unbelievable Mystery Hole” is one of these.  We stopped there in 1995 on our drive through (but it was closed).  When I drove by this time it was also closed.  But it has all of the quirkiness.

Bottom line, the place claims to be a gravity defying hole and draws tourists who want to have a “can’t believe your eyes” experience.  It is just funny to me that it so happens to be close to a National Park site (as many of these great experience places are.”

A quick shot of the Mystery Hole from the car on this trip
My daughter Marissa taking a photo in 1995
Welcome to Gauley Bridge, WV

After passing by the Hawk’s Nest State Park, which offers some spectacular views (we actually stayed there in 1995), I continued on my trek into Gauley Bridge, where the Kanawha River is formed at the confluence of the New River (which formed the gorge) and the Gauley River.

This is actually another scenic location with a beautiful view of the beginnings of the Kanahwa River and a very nice waterfall – Cathedral Falls. At a drop of 60 feet, the falls are considered to be one of the highest and most scenic waterfalls in West Virginia. What’s better, they are literally located right alongside US 60. Definitely worth a visit.

Visiting Cathedral Falls near Gauley Bridge, WV
Another shot of Cathedral Falls
A panorama of the confluence forming the Kanahwa River at Gauley Bridge, WV

I didn’t see many murals on this trip, but there was a nice one on the side of a building in Gauley Bridge.  The only actual mural I saw on the Midland Trail until I was in Charleston.

Train Mural in Gauley Bridge painted by Nancy Lane to commemorate the rich rail heritage of the town.
The C&O Railroad Bridge across the Gauley River.

From Gauley Bridge, US 60 follows the route of the Kanawha River.  Another nice set of waterfalls can be seen at Kanawha Falls in Glen Ferris, WV.  The drop of these falls is only about 15 feet, but it is a wide and loud waterfall.

Kanawha Falls in Glen Ferris, WV
Another shot of Kanawha Falls

After my brief stop at Kanawha Falls, I continued into Charleston on the winding highway.  It really was a beautiful drive.  And it is always a treat to see the golden dome of the state capitol building.

West Virginia State Capitol Bulding

Part 2 will be posted soon and is all about the Charleston area. Part 3 will then be posted about the portion of Route 60 from Charleston to the Kentucky border.

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V is for Vistas – #atozchallenge

Vistas are the joy of back roads travel. Every corner, every crest of a hill, every mile offers a new vista.  And this country has some spectacular and splendid vistas.

Over the years I have seen some amazing vistas. Whether they be in the deserts of the southwest, the high plains of Montana or on the oceans in the east or the west, the views are endless and inspiring.  Following are some of the vistas I have enjoyed and their locations.  Enjoy the ride and the views.

Sunset at the Badlands in South Dakota
St. Anthony Sand Dunes in Idaho
A view of the Portland Head Light in Maine
Hills of Shenandoah Valley in presunrise hours on Easter 2017
Sunrise over the Atlantic Ocean as seen from Old Orchard Beach, ME
Golden Gate Bridge in 2016
Pacific Ocean near Reedsport, Oregon
Caddo Lake near Uncertain, TX
Highway to Cody, Wyoming
A lonely highway in south central Nebraska, near Overland
Horse Country – Lexington, Kentucky
Cincinnati Skyline
Coal Mine Canyon in Arizona, ca. 1983
Delaware Seashore Bridge at sunset
Spacious skies over the Grand Canyon in Arizona
The river into Juneau, Alaska as seen from a mountain top near Juneau
The mountains and the Yellowstone River as seen from US 89
The long straight highway near Cohagen, MT
Beautiful Highway heading into Virginia from Kentucky
Louisville, KY as seen from across the Ohio River in Indiana
The Oyate Trail highway in southern South Dakota
Fall colors from the Virginia Creeper Trail in Virginia
Beach at Clallam Bay, WA adorned with seagulls
New York City at night as seen from Hoboken, NJ
Sawtooths as seen from Lower Stanley, Idaho
Arkansas Hwy 8 near Amity, AR
Scenic cinder Hills and Shadows as seen on Idaho Hwy 33
Bison relax along Lava Creek in Yellowstone while pronghorned antelope look on from the background
Panoramic View of Pittsburgh from atop Mt. Washington
Niagara Falls, Ontario
The Tetons as seen from near Drummond, ID
Sunset in the Sweetgrass, north of Dunkirk, MT
White Sands, NM
A view of the New River Gorge in West Virginia
Sunflowers forever near Lexington, KY
Wind Turbines seem to blossom like flowers out of the corn fields of Iowa
Pennsylvania sunrise as seen from Boyce Mayview Park near Upper St. Clair, PA
Fall Colors from the Eagle’s Nest above Bancroft, Ontario near Algonquin
Texas Hwy 30 between Huntsville and Shiro
Hells Canyon in northeast Oregon is actually wider and deeper than the Grand Canyon
Three Sisters – nicknamed Faith/Hope/Charity near Sisters, Oregon
Somewhere in Kansas
View of the Beartooths near Red Lodge, Montana from the highway was awesome
America the Beautiful – A scene near Glacier National Park

 

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N is for National Parks & Monuments – #atozchallenge

The US National Park System has 417 official units throughout the country including 59 National Parks, 87 National Monuments, 19 National Preserves, 51 National Historic Parks, 78 National Historic Sites, 4 National Battlefield Parks, 9 National Military Parks, 9 National Battlefields, 30 National Memorials and a number of other National sites including National Rivers, National Seashores, National Lakeshores, National Parkways and National Trails.

Bison relax along Lava Creek in Yellowstone while pronghorned antelope look on from the background
Sumoflam and Cannons at Vicksburg National Military Park
Towpath Trail in Cuyahoga Valley NP, Ohio

Officially, the National Park Service preserves unimpaired the natural and cultural resources and values of the National Park System for the enjoyment, education, and inspiration of this and future generations. The Park Service cooperates with partners to extend the benefits of natural and cultural resource conservation and outdoor recreation throughout this country and the world.

Some of the scenic and colorful hills of Theodore Roosevelt National Park
A couple of my children at the birthplace of Abraham Lincoln in Kentucky in 1997
Badlands National Park in SD

The NPS is a great blessing to the citizens of this country and all others that may visit.  They have some amazing offerings and a road trip that passes by these is not a worthy roadtrip.  These sites are the gems of our country!

Though I have visited all 50 states in the US, I have not been able to get to many of the sites.  Of the 59 National Parks, for instance, I have only visited 28 of them and some of those were way before my travel blogging and photography days. Of all of the others, I have been to 77 of the nearly 350 sites.  So, I still have a long way to go.

Grand Tetons along US 89 in March 2013
Visiting Shenandoah National Park on Easter Sunday 2017
Gettysburg Address Commemorative Sign, July 1998

That said, I have thoroughly enjoyed my visits to many of the National Parks, Monuments and other NPS sites. My personal favorites are Glacier National Park (Montana), Grand Teton National Park (Wyoming) and Yellowstone National Park (WY) — OK…I love the mountains!!

Following are some photos of some of the other NPS Sites that I have visited over the years.  More are sure to come soon!!  (In fact, just this past weekend — Easter weekend 2017 — I drove the Skyline Drive in Shenandoah National Park and got photos of the Easter Sunrise!!)

Easter Morning Sunrise 2017 in Shenandoah National Park
Grave markers of the US Calvary Soldiers that died at the Battle of Little Big Horn in Little Big Horn National Monument in Montana
Sumoflam at Montezuma Castle National Monument in Arizona in 1983
Visiting the Grand Canyon in 1983
Dinosaur National Monument, Vernal, UT
Family at Sunset Crater National Monument north of Flagstaff in July 1993
The Washington Monument and the US Capitol in Washington DC in 2016
Visiting White Sands, NM in 2013
Visiting Craters of the Moon in Idaho in 2013
Entering Mt. Rainier National Park on WA 410 south of Greenwater, WA
Agate Fossil Bed National Monument in Nebraska
With some family members and a friend at Glacier National Park (May 2005)
Purple Mountain Majesties – Glacier Bay National Park, Alaska
Mount Olympus and Olympic National Park in Washington as seen from Hwy 104
One of the wild horses on the sand dunes at Assateague National Seashore in Maryland
Visiting the Petrified Forest National Park in Arizona with some tourists from the Isle of Man in 1983
Sumoflam at the White House – July 1990
Mt. Rushmore in 2013
Family at the Lincoln Home in Springfield, Illinois, Summer 2001
Visiting Yellowstone National Park in 2014
Family at the George Rogers Clark National Historic Park in Vincennes, Indiana Summer 2001
Capulin Volcano – part of the Capulin National Monument in New Mexico
Some of the kids viewing the massive New River Gorge Bridge in New River Gorge National River, WV in August 1995
Statue of Liberty, Ellis Island, NY 1990
Visiting Bandelier National Monument near Los Alamos, New Mexico in 1979. I have always enjoyed visiting old Indian ruins.
Sumoflam at the Everglades in Florida in July 1990
At the St. Louis Arch in Missouri
At Golden Gate Bridge in May 2015
My son Seth at Wupatki National Monument in April 1992

 

 

 

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