Sumoflam’s Guide to Planning an Offbeat Road Trip




Learn How to Get there
Learn How to Get There

I love to travel the back roads of America. I also love to see Offbeat Attractions. Of course, I must drop by those strange named towns (see photo above). But, I also want to visit historical sites, National Parks, scenic locations, covered bridges and more that may be along the way. So, in this post I will lay out the “Sumoflam Guide” and the process I go about in planning almost all of my trips. Hopefully, you as the readers will be able to glean some helpful information in your plans and do as I do…..ENJOY THE RIDE!

WHERE DO WE WANT TO GO?

Where Are We Going? (This sign in Millersburg, Ohio)
Where Are We Going? (This is in Millersburg, Ohio)

For the purpose of this particular guide, I am going to create a sample trip from St. Louis to Kansas City and back. My approach to this trip will begin at the St. Louis Arch and end up back there with very little back tracking along the way. Further, for simplicity, I will plan this as a four day round trip.

THE PLANNING “TOOLS”

Know Your Directions (Florence, Oregon)
Know Your Directions (Florence, Oregon)

Before I ever take off on a trip, I first get out the “tools” of the trade and begin mapping out a course.

  • First and foremost I go to Google Maps. This helps me see the general course I will be taking. It will allow me to hone in on probable routes, preferably off of the Interstates and perhaps even on county roads, if time allows. Obviously, my goal is NOT to take the fastest or most direct route, but to take the one that provides me the greatest mix of places to visit, sites to see and photographs to take.
  • After determining probable routes, I then go to my handy-dandy OFFBEAT ATTRACTION site – Roadside America – for the ultimate guide to the best offbeat attractions in my route area. I will provide details on this later on below.
  • There are a number of other reference sites I may visit depending on the routes and locations. I will list a number of my favorites later in this post. They include websites that cover the quirky, the offbeat, the giant/big things, National Parks and Monuments, historic sites, etc.
  • Finally, since there will likely be hotel stays along the way, I typically go to my favorite site for hotels, which is Choice Hotels. Since I am a “Choice Privileges” member, I gain points and free nights by staying in their hotel brands whenever possible. But, there are many other sites out there, so choose your favorites.
  • After mapping things out, I glean information about towns from Google and Bing. I may do a search on a town or an offbeat site to get more information, look at images, etc.
  • For many towns I may also do a search in Wikipedia. This is a great source of detailed information
  • Finally, after searching through all of those, I find my way to the numerous town websites, tourist sites, chamber of commerce sites, etc.

Isn’t the World Wide Web Wonderful?

MAPPING OUT THE ROUTE

ROAD TRIP!
ROAD TRIP!

Google Maps is an amazing tool and it is also fun. With their Street View program you can practically take a virtual trip to anywhere — from the comfort of your home. Of course, there is really nothing like being there in person.

Google now has a new version of Google Maps, which has some nice features. But, I prefer the Classic Maps version chiefly because I can include multiple destinations. Returning to the sample trip from St. Louis to Kansas City, this is what the initial search would give me on Google Maps:

GoogleMap1
New Google Maps – St. Louis to Kansas City

On the map above you can see that I mapped a trip from the Gateway Arch in St. Louis to the Nelson-Atkins Museum in Kansas City. It provided me with two driving routes — one direct down the Interstate and another quite a bit out of the way (if you are wanting a direct route). However, if I wanted to map an intermediate destination, I would not be able to include it and also include Kansas City. So, I will use the “Classic Maps” version by going to the settings in the upper right corner and select Classic Maps.

Switch to Classic Maps
Switch to Classic Maps

The best part of the Classic Maps view is the multiple destination selection option. With this option you can select up to 25 locations for Google to map out and create a route.

Multiple Destination Selector
Multiple Destination Selector

Following is what I used to create the ROAD TRIP! shot above:

Multiple Destination Options
Multiple Destination Options

After selecting the main destinations – in this case, St. Louis to Kansas City, it is time to dig deeper and find those offbeat attractions and other places of interest and then plug them into Google Maps.

NOW THE FUN BEGINS – FINDING THE PLACES ON THE ROAD

RABannerThe guys at Roadside America are phenomenal. They offer maps, directions and tourist attraction details as a convenience to their users. As they say it on their website – “RoadsideAmerica.com is a caramel-coated-nutbag-full of odd and hilarious travel destinations — over 10,000 places in the USA and Canada — ready for exploration.” I should note that any content from Roadside America used on my site is done so with the written permission of Roadside America. The wonderful thing about their site is that they take hundreds of user submitted photos and details and include them on the site. It is THE Honey Hole of Offbeat Travel!! If you have never visited them, check out their About Page and learn all about the great work that Doug, Ken and Mike have compiled over the years.

Roadside America Maps
Roadside America Maps

The next step in a fine back road trip is finding the unique places. The first stop should ALWAYS be Roadside America. Once on their site, click on the “Maps” link as shown above. You will get to the Roadside America Maps Page as shown below.

Roadside America Map Page
Roadside America Map Page

Since we are doing a Missouri Trip, you would click on the Missouri part of the Map (or select the state on the left hand list). This will bring up the Roadside America Missouri Page.

Roadside America Missouri page
Roadside America Missouri page

On each state page there is a ton of information….best sites, oddities, etc. There is also a small link to the Missouri Offbeat Attractions Map. Click that link and you will get the map below:

Roadside America Missouri Attractions Map
Roadside America Missouri Attractions Map

Each red pin on the map represents a unique site which you can refer to in conjunction with you Google Map trip plan. There is also an alphabetic list (based on town name) on the left side of the map. For convenience, I have circled the area from St. Louis to Kansas City to provide an idea of how many attractions there are. Bear in mind that these are predominantly the Offbeat Attractions and may not include historical museums and sites, national and state parks, scenic locations, etc.

Roadside America Map of downtown St. Louis
Roadside America Map of downtown St. Louis

When you open a state map, you can mouse over a section and double-click and the map will zoom in (it uses Google Maps technology). this will provide you with a closeup view of the area and the related pins. Click on a pin and it will pop up the Offbeat Attraction for that pin. Each attraction also has a “More” link, which, when clicked, will open up the page with details on that specific attraction. There are over 10,000 of these pages on the Roadside America site.

A typical Roadside America Attraction Page
A typical Roadside America Attraction Page

By viewing the attractions page you can find out where it is, see photos of the site, get other visitor’s comments and also see a site rating to let you know if it is “Well Worth the Visit” or just a site that may be of interest.

Roadside America iPhone app
Roadside America       iPhone app

And, while on the road, you can use the amazing Roadside America app for your iPhone.  It even has a GPS locator and will tell you the sites closest to your location on the road.  A must have for the back roads offbeat traveler!!

HONING DOWN THE ADVENTURE

Which Way Do I Go?
Which Way Do I Go?

Since the St. Louis to Kansas City trip will be a four day round trip, I typically will create a more detailed plan for each day. Since I can get actual addresses of sites along the way from Roadside America, Google and other sites, I can actually plug those into the Google Map directory. So, I will add the numerous sites from day one…initially with the sites from Roadside America. Then I will take my next step, based on those sites, and see if there are other sites of interest along the way, such as scenic views, state or National Parks, etc.

Sample Trip Day 1
Sample Trip Day 1

While adding these sites, I also create a document with the names of the places in their order. You can see from the map above that a number of places were selected in the St. Louis area. All of the locations on this map are just from Roadside America. Since Chillicothe will be the end point for the day, I will then fill in the blanks for other interesting sites along the way… As I look at the route, the following towns pop up along the way… St. Charles, St. Peters, Wentzville, Foristell, Wright City, Warrenton, Jonesburg, High Hill, New Florence, Danville, Williamsburg…and many more. I also notice that for a good part of the way I can go down Old U.S. 40 (called Booneslick Rd along part of the way and Old US 40 as well.) To me, this would be my option rather than the interstate, though, at many points it may parallel the interstate. When I hit Danville, it veers away onto some county roads, but returns to Old US 40 in Williamsburg. I will follow these roads until I hit US 54 which heads north at Kingdom City (which is an interesting place to visit by the way!!)

Kingdom City Water Tower
Kingdom City Water Tower

US 54 heads north to Mexico, Missouri, but veers off just south and turns into Missouri 22 before it goes into Mexico.  So, basically, all towns along that route are game for my search for interesting places.

GETTING TOWN INFORMATION

Mexico, Missouri
Mexico, Missouri

Perhaps one of my more unique methods of finding interesting places on the route is by using Google Maps, Google Search, Google Images, Wikipedia and miscellaneous town websites in combination.  It is almost like taking a virtual trip before I ever get on the road.  And I typically plan to hit more spots than I am actually able, but it really provides for some flexibility and it is fun.  Part of the reason for the flexibility is that you never know what you will see along the way that was unplanned.

Google Images for Mexico, Missouri
Google Images for Mexico, Missouri

Since it is halfway on the route, I randomly selected Mexico, Missouri to provide an example of how I go about finding places.  I have never been to Mexico and so, as I write this, I have no idea if there is anything of interest in this small central Missouri town.  My first step is a Google Search and then I switch over to images, some of which are above.  I didn’t really see anything that struck me there, so I went back to Google and found a website for Mexico, Missouri.  When I hit that page I immediately discovered that there is a Statue of Liberty in downtown Mexico (see photo below).

Mexico Web Page
Mexico Web Page

There are a few Statues of Liberty dotting the U.S. and it is always fun to capture them.  Since Mexico is on the route, this is a definite stop for a photo.  On further study of the Mexico website I also learn that it is the “Firebrick Capital of the World,” and that this industry has kept the town alive.  They have a Firebrick Museum with memorabilia and other items, as well as a Firebrick walk in the front.  This too could be of interest.  Being from Lexington, KY, the “Horse Capital of the World”, I also find it interesting that one of the few Horse Museums outside of the Kentucky Horse Park is located in Mexico.  It is the American Saddlebred Horse Museum and is the oldest Saddlebred Horse Museum in the nation.  This information alone would warrant a stop in Mexico as we pass by on our roundabout trip to Kansas City.

Centralia Triceratops
Centralia Triceratops

Of course, we were going through Mexico because of one of the sites we selected from Roadside America.  In this case, it is Larry Vennard’s Outside Sculpture Park of dinosaurs and other critters.  Those of you that follow my blogs know I have visited others like this in Canada, Washington and then, of course, the famous Jurustic Park in Wisconsin. (See an entire post dedicated to “Yard Art”).  This is certainly one of my passions out on the road….seeing these.  So, on this trip, I will be stopping here!!  Then, continuing west towards Salisbury, MO, there are the Scrap Metal Grasshoppers.  This too is a likely stop along the way.

Locust Creek Covered Bridge, Missouri
Locust Creek Covered Bridge, Missouri

I also have a fascination with Covered Bridges.  I have seen dozens of these old monuments to bridge building history, so a stop at the Locust Creek Covered Bridge State Park naturally is on the agenda before I finally hit Chillicothe, Missouri for an overnight stay.  By the way, Chillicothe is the “Home of Sliced Bread.”

Of course, I also explore interesting places to eat and scenic drives…and the list goes on and on.  Hopefully, this provides a piece of my mind and thought process as I plan my road trips.  The planning is almost as fun as the trip itself!!

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A Day Drive in Central Idaho: Volcanoes, Mountains and Rivers

Teepee in Stanley, ID
Teepee in Stanley, ID

June 8, 2013:  I had a free day in Rexburg, ID so I thought I would take a day trip into the heart of Idaho.  I visited old nuclear sites, sagebrush filled grasslands, ancient volcanic flows, rugged (and jagged) mountains and riverine landscapes .  It was an awesome day of geographic and scenic diversity.  Here is my map of the trip:


View Larger Map – Rexburg to the Sawtooths and Salmon River

I decided to leave early so I could catch all of the day’s sunlight.  It would be a long day.  After heading south to Idaho Falls, I stayed on US 20 west and made my way to the gravel road that leads to the small, nearly ghost town of Atomic City.  I had seen earlier reviews on the town on Roadside America. I could see that the content of the article was a bit dated as I made my way into the small town.  Atomic City was, at one time, a boom city due to the growth in nuclear research facilities in the area, namely the Idaho National Laboratory and its many secret test facilities in the area.

US 20 west out of Idaho Falls
US 20 west out of Idaho Falls
Land of Elephant Hunters
Land of Elephant Hunters

About 12,000 years ago hunters came to this area for big game such as mammoths, camels and giant bison.  Looking at the landscape now, it is difficult to imagine.

Big Butte, Idaho
Big Butte, Idaho
Three Buttes Site
Three Buttes Site
Sagebrush and mountains near Atomic City
Sagebrush and mountains near Atomic City
Gravel Road to Atomic City
Gravel Road to Atomic City
Atomic City, ID
Atomic City, ID

The town used to have a store, a bar and a Texaco gas station.  The gas station used to house the bar.  Both appear to be closed now.  In fact, the gas station does not even have the Post Office sign on it any longer.  but the vestiges of the old town still remain…

Old bar sign by the old Texaco Station
Old bar sign by the old Texaco Station
Old Twin Buttes Cafe
Old Twin Buttes Cafe

Despite the ghostly appearance of the town, from May thru September the weekends are pretty active here with the Atomic Motor Raceway, which still offers locals the opportunity to race their dwarf karts, minis, modifieds and other stock cars.  They had no event the day I was there.

Atomic Motor Raceway, Atomic City, ID
Atomic Motor Raceway, Atomic City, ID

There are some old potato barns and wildflowers that caught my eye in Atomic City as well.  A sign that there is still some semblance of life….

Potato Barns
Sod Roof Potato Barns in Atomic City
Wildflowers in Atomic City
Wildflowers in Atomic City

I left the town of about 20 people and headed west on US 20/26 towards the town of Arco next.

US Routes 20/26
US Routes 20/26
Twin Buttes near Atomic City as seen heading west to Arco, ID
Twin Buttes near Atomic City as seen heading west to Arco, ID
Sawtooth Range n the Distance
Sawtooth Range in the Distance

Along the way there was a nice new Rest Area that had some history included, especially concerning the Nuclear Work in the area.

Nuclear Reactor sign
Nuclear Reactor sign
Nuclear Reactors info
Nuclear Reactors info
The Road to Arco, ID
The Road to Arco, ID

Arco, Idaho is a town of about 1000 people and is located in Butte County, Idaho. Originally known as Root Hog, the original town site was five miles south at the junction of two stagecoach lines (Blackfoot-Wood River and Blackfoot-Salmon). A suspension bridge that crossed the Big Lost River funneled traffic through the settlement. The town leaders applied to the U.S. Post Office for the town name of “Junction.” However, The Postmaster General thought the name too common and suggested that the place be named Arco for Georg von Arco (1869–1940), an inventor and pioneer in the field of radio transmission, who was visiting Washington, D.C. from his home country of Germany at the time. The town later moved four miles southeast when the stage station was moved to Webb Springs at Big Southern Butte. When the Oregon Short Line railroad arrived from Blackfoot in 1901 the stage lines became obsolete and the town of Arco moved northwest to its present site.

Downtown Arco, Idaho
Downtown Arco, Idaho

Arco was the first community in the world ever to be lit by electricity generated by nuclear power. This occurred on July 17, 1955, powered by Argonne National Laboratory’s BORAX-III reactor at the nearby National Reactor Testing Station (NRTS), which eventually became the site of the Idaho National Energy Laboratory, a predecessor of the current Idaho National Laboratory.

Arco, Idaho City Hall
Arco, Idaho City Hall – First City to be powered by Nuclear Energy
Historical Sign in Arco
Historical Sign in Arco

Arco is also known for “Number Hill”, a butte behind the city with a bunch of numbers on it.  History of the hill states that the tradition began with the 1920 graduating class of Butte County High School when they painted a 20 up on the hill.  Since that time the tradition has continued with each class adding their years to the hill.  There is now even a cafe in town named after it.

Number Hill - Arco, ID
Number Hill – Arco, ID
Number Hill Grill - Arco, ID
Number Hill Grill – Arco, ID
Number Hill Grill
Number Hill Grill

A few more scenes from Arco

Submarine Sail of USS Hawkbill
Submarine Sail of USS Hawkbill

The USS Hawkbill SSN-666 (also known as the Devil Boat) was launched in 1969 and was decommissioned in 2000.  The sail was sent to Arco to be added to the Idaho Science Center, which is housed in Arco.

Pickles Place - Home of the "Atomic Burger"
Pickles Place – Home of the “Atomic Burger”
EAT sign at Pickle's Place in Arco, ID
EAT sign at Pickle’s Place in Arco, ID
Wall Mural in Arco, ID
Wall Mural in Arco, ID
The DK Motel - found a motel named after me
The DK Motel – found a motel named after me!!

My next stop on the route was a visit to Craters of the Moon National Monument, one of at least six National Monuments dedicated to volcanoes (see list of National Monuments). Lewis and Clark came across this expansive area of Cinder Cones and Lava Flows in 1805.

The road to Craters of the Moon
The road to Craters of the Moon
Craters of the Moon Entrance
Craters of the Moon Entrance
Craters of the Moon sign with mountains in background
Craters of the Moon sign with mountains in background

Though many had come before, the official name “Craters of the Moon” was coined by Robert Limbert who was the first man to thoroughly explore and promote the area. The name became official in 1924 when the area was established as a National Monument.

Expansive views of the lava flows
Expansive views of the lava flows

The lava flows here were a result of fissure eruptions that would create cinder cones due to the high fluidity of the basalt flows that allowed gasses to escape.  Sunset Crater in Arizona is very similar to this.

Blocky aa Lava Flow
Blocky aa Lava Flow

Lava flows called “aa” are basaltic lava flows characterized by a rough or rubbly surface composed of broken lava blocks called clinker.  This is really rough stuff and scary to walk on.

Lava monoliths in the Devil's Orchard section of the park
Lava monoliths in the Devil’s Orchard section of the park
Devil's Orchard
Devil’s Orchard
Basalt Flows
Basalt Flows
Green in the lava flows
Green in the lava flows

There are a number of Cinder Cones in the park, some of which may be climbed by visitors.

Hiking a cinder cone
Hiking a cinder cone
Flows and hills
Flows and hills

I was very fortunate in my timing in the park as many of the native wildflowers were in bloom.  These wildflowers struggle for the little water and naturally space themselves, pretty amazing.

Fields of Yellow
Fields of Yellow
Arrowleaf Balsamroot
Arrowleaf Balsamroot
Arrowleaf Balsamroot
Arrowleaf Balsamroot
Larkspur
Larkspur
Larkspur closeup
Larkspur closeup
Delicate Yellow Wood Sorrel
Delicate Yellow Wood Sorrel
Dwarf Buckwheat
Dwarf Buckwheat – amazed with pink and white – blooms are smaller than a dime
Pink Wildflowers
Pink Wildflowers
Who knows?
Who knows?

And a few more lava photos…

Green in the Lava
Green in the Lava
Lava, trees and mountains
Lava, trees and mountains

From the Craters of the Moon I headed down the “Peaks to Craters Scenic Byway” for what I consider to be the real HIGHlight of the trip….

Peaks to Craters Scenic byway
Peaks to Craters Scenic byway

And then passed by Goodale’s Cutoff

Goodale's Cutoff
Goodale’s Cutoff

The road goes on forever through the lava…much easier today then it was for the emigrants

US 20 heading to Idaho 75 and Carey, ID
US 20 heading to Idaho 75 and Carey, ID
Welcome to Carey, Idaho
Welcome to Carey, Idaho

Carey, Idaho is basically the Gateway to Idaho 75 heading into the Sawtooth Mountains. Actually, Carey is located at the junctions of U.S. Routes 26/93 and 20 and is the commercial center of the Little Wood River Valley. It was founded by a group of Mormon colonists led by Cyrus Joseph Stanford in 1883 who named the town “Marysville.” It was renamed “Carey” with the arrival of his younger brother, Thomas C. Stanford in 1884.

Farm tractor on highway in Carey, ID
Farm tractor on highway in Carey, ID
Dino sighting in Carey, ID
Dino sighting in Carey, ID
Mountains as seen from Carey, ID
Mountains as seen from Carey, ID

And then onto Idaho 75 and a new scenic byway

Sawtooth Scenic Byway
Sawtooth Scenic Byway

I would have to say that this drive was probably one of the more stunning mountain drives I have ever been on.  The jagged look (thus Sawtooth) of the range is impressive and awe inspiring.

First Look at the Sawtooth Range peeking out over the foothills
First Look at the Sawtooth Range peeking out over the foothills
First Stop - Bellevue, ID - Gateway to the Sawtooths
First Stop – Bellevue, ID – Gateway to the Sawtooths

The first town on ID 75 is Bellevue, Idaho, which is Idaho’s only chartered city. The town was established in March 1882 and currently has a population of about 2300.  It is nestled in the foothills at 5.170 feet, before advancing up into the higher altitudes.

Coke Ad on Bellevue Wall
Coke Ad on Bellevue Wall
Antelope Mural, Bellevue, ID
Antelope Mural, Bellevue, ID
Old Truck with Old Gasoline Ads
Old Truck with Old Gasoline Ads
Old Cabin in Downtown Bellevue, ID
Old Cabin in Downtown Bellevue, ID
Original Bellevue City Hall - Now the Old City Hall Museum
Original Bellevue City Hall – Now the Old City Hall Museum – unique building

Then there are the continuous stream of scrap metal animals, like this bear at a garden shop in Bellevue…

Scrap Metal Bear - Bellevue, ID
Scrap Metal Bear – Bellevue, ID

From Bellevue it was north to Hailey and then into the Ketchum/Sun Valley area.  From Bellevue the climb began and the mountains north began to look regal and grand.

Sawtootsh from ID 75 north of Hailey, ID
Sawtooths from ID 75 north of Hailey, ID

I arrived in Ketchum around noon.  This is a touristy town, obviously with the Sun Valley ski resorts and all of the summer mountain activity.  As with many of these kinds of towns, unique art abounds.  Here are a few “artsy” things I saw in Ketchum….

Straw building in Ketchum, ID
“Centerpiece” by Patrick Dougherty in Ketchum, ID

The above twig and branch sculpture, called “Centerpiece” was made by artist Patrick Dougherty, a North Carolina artist who works with tree saplings as his medium.  This was made in 2010for the Sun Valley Center for the Arts, which will be building a new facility on the grounds where Centerpiece stands.  Dougherty has over 230 creations on exhibit all over the world.  See more of his work here.

Unique Sculpture
Unique Sculpture – Ketchum, Idaho
Moose! Yet another one for the collection. This one in Ketchum, Idaho
Moose! Yet another one for the collection. This one in Ketchum, Idaho

And then there are the unique places in town:

Pioneer Saloon - Ketchum, Idaho
Pioneer Saloon – Ketchum, Idaho

The Pioneer Saloon… Or the Commercial Club as it was called originally, was opened in the 1940’s as a gambling casino operated by Otis Hobbs. A few years later the casino was closed and the American Legion then took it over and used it as a meeting hall. For a short time, the building was converted into a dry goods store.  In the mid 60’s, the Pioneer was redesigned as a restaurant. The present version of the Pioneer Saloon dates from 1972 — hence the phrase “Where were you in 72.”

Gnome on a Bike - loved this graphic on a bike shop in Ketchum
Gnome on a Bike – loved this graphic on a bike shop in Ketchum

From the Ketchum/Sun Valley area I continued north on ID 75 into the mountains.  On this day I happened to be heading north while the Sawtooth Relay was in action.  I saw runners for miles and thought it was just a marathon.  Turns out it is a 62 mile relay race with teams of 6 running from Stanley, ID to Ketchum, ID along ID 75.  It is a fund raising event that apparently had over 300 teams in 2013.  I saw many of the team vans along the road.

Mountains and Runners - The Sawtooth Relay 2013
Mountains and Runners – The Sawtooth Relay 2013
More Mountain Views - with runners...
More Mountain Views – with runners…

The drive eventually got me to Galena Pass, which is at a little over 8700 feet.

Sawtooth Mountains heading north in ID 75
Boulder Mountains heading north in ID 75
More of the Boulder Mountains heading north in ID 75
More of the Boulder Mountains heading north in ID 75
Boulder Mountains heading north in ID 75
Boulder Mountains heading north in ID 75
Sign at Galena Pass, Idaho
Sign at Galena Pass, Idaho

Galena Summit marks the divide between the Big Wood River and Salmon River drainage areas.   Just a bit more down the road is the Galena Overlook, which offers an expansive view of the Sawtooth Range to the north and the headwaters of the Salmon River in the Stanley Basin below.

View from Galena Overlook
View from Galena Overlook

The view from Galena Overlook was awesome.  The blue lake in the bottom center will be seen in another photo from lake level as I ended up on that road below in the valley.

Sawtooth Range as seen from Galena OVerlook
Sawtooth Range as seen from Galena Overlook

DSC_8726

Bottom of the Stanley Basin. Lake from ground level
Bottom of the Stanley Basin. Lake from ground level
Salmon River source
Salmon River source

Just a small stream here, but turns into a mighty big river as it goes down the hill (which will be seen later in this post)

The beginnings of the Salmon River
The beginnings of the Salmon River
Antelope hanging around the source of the Salmon River near Vienna
Antelope hanging around the source of the Salmon River near Vienna

 

Vienna, Idaho
Vienna, Idaho

From this vantage point the rugged Sawtooth Range is clearly in sight….

Sawtooth Range as seen from Vienna
Sawtooth Range as seen from Vienna

From this area, as I ventured further north, I came to the Sawtooth City historical marker and then into the area around the crystal clear Alturas Lake.

Sawtooth City, Idaho
Sawtooth City, Idaho

 

Fun chain saw carving near Sawtooth City
Fun chain saw carving near Sawtooth City

The scenery from here was awe-inspiring as many of the views of the snow covered peaks also offered scenic carpets of flower covered meadows.

Flower Covered Meadows near Sawtooth City, ID
Flower Covered Meadows near Sawtooth City, ID
Alturas Lake in the Sawtooth Valley, ID
Alturas Lake in the Sawtooth Valley, ID

 

Fishing on Alturas Lake
Fishing on Alturas Lake
Kayaking on Alturas Lake
Kayaking on Alturas Lake
Mountains as seen on the road near Alturas Lake
Mountains as seen on the road near Alturas Lake

I continued north towards Redfish Lake and then into Stanley.  I wanted to stop at Redfish Lake, but my time was running short.  But the scenery was amazing…

Sawtooth Mountains near Redlake
Sawtooth Mountains near Redlake
Jagged Sawtooths near Stanley, ID
Jagged Sawtooths near Stanley, ID
Welcome to Stanley, Idaho
Welcome to Stanley, Idaho

Stanley, Idaho….I could SOOOO move here (in the summer at least).   Stanley is is the hub point for three different Scenic Byways (The Sawtooth, the Ponderosa Pine and the Salmon River). It sits in a valley surrounded by mountains at a little over 6200 feet in elevation.   It is a town with a number of small resorts/motels and a couple of places to eat.  Wikipedia says the population in 2010 was 63, but it appeared to be closer to 200 to me.

Hello from Stanley - with the Sawtooths in the background
Hello from Stanley – with the Sawtooths in the background
Cabin in Stanley, Idaho
Cabin in Stanley, Idaho
Scene from Stanley, Idaho
Scene from Stanley, Idaho
Filling up the Married Up Mobile with mountains in the background
Filling up the Married Up Mobile with mountains in the background

It had been a long day so far and I was hungry, so I stopped in at the Mountain Village Express (part of the Mountain Village Resort) to find something to eat.  Turns out they make breakfast all day and an omelet sounding appealing!!

Mountain Village Express interior
Mountain Village Express interior
My Lunch - an omelet at Mountain Village Express in Stanley
My Lunch – an omelet at Mountain Village Express in Stanley
Hotel in Stanley, Idaho?
Motel in Stanley, Idaho?

Perhaps one of the most scenic photos I have ever taken….

The Sawtooths as seen from Lower Stanley, Idaho
The Sawtooths and the Salmon River as seen from Lower Stanley, Idaho
Teepee in Stanley, ID
Teepee in Stanley, ID

I hated to leave Stanley, but I had to begin the winding descent along the Salmon River back into Rexburg.  I went through Lower Stanley and then followed the Salmon River Scenic Byway.  At first it was still rugged mountains and a raging river, enticing to rafters and kayakers (and probably bears too…)

Scene along the Salmon River byway
Scene along the Salmon River Scenic Byway
Salmon River Scenic Byway
Salmon River Scenic Byway
The Salmon River surges
The Salmon River surges
Some rafters enjoy the ride on the Salmon River
Some rafters enjoy the ride on the Salmon River
Raging Rapids on the Salmon
Raging Rapids on the Salmon

The mountains soon began to fade away in the background as a more desertish/volcanic landscape.  Nonetheless, this was rugged country full of deep gorges, steep hills and to me was reminiscent of western movie scenes.

One of many chasms along the Salmon River
One of many chasms along the Salmon River
Slippery lava slopes on the Salmon River Scenic Byway
Slippery lava slopes on the Salmon River Scenic Byway
Old cabins and flowery meadow along the Salmon River Scenic Byway
Old cabins and flowery meadows along the Salmon River Scenic Byway
Multi-Colored views along the Salmon River Scenic Byway
Multi-Colored views along the Salmon River Scenic Byway
Clayton Smelter
Clayton Smelter
Clayton, Idaho - Population 7
Clayton, Idaho – Population 7

As I approached the historical marker above, there was a County Sheriff taking radar.  It is a downhill road and Clayton is on the county line.  I stopped for a couple of photos and a small chit-chat with the sheriff who told me that Clayton is practically a ghost town.  The sign above says it all!

Old wagons seen near Challis,ID
Old wagons at Land of Yankee Fork Interpretive Center seen near Challis, ID
Old mining equipment at Land of Yankee Fork Interpretive Center near Challis, ID
Old mining equipment at Land of Yankee Fork Interpretive Center near Challis, ID
Colorful buttes near Challis, ID
Colorful buttes near Challis, ID

As I hit US Route 93 from ID 75, I headed southeast towards Mackay, ID on US 93.  To my excitement the mountains were not all gone.  Indeed, I headed toward a new set range of mountains and drove through some pretty spectacular canyons as I entered the Grand View Canyon then out into the Lost River Valley which then opens up to an awesome view of the Lost River Mountain Range, which is home to the 9 highest peaks in Idaho.

Grandview Canyon on US 93 - northern section of the Peaks to Craters Scenic Byway
Grandview Canyon on US 93 – northern section of the Peaks to Craters Scenic Byway
Lost River Mountains, Idaho
Lost River Mountains, Idaho
Mount Borah as seen from Willow Creek Summit, Elev 7160 feet
Mount Borah as seen from Willow Creek Summit, Elev 7160 feet

Mount Borah is the highest mountain in Idaho at 12,667 feet and one of the most prominent peaks in the contiguous states. This mountain was named for William E. Borah, who served in the U.S. Senate from 1907 until 1940. A major earthquake fracture in October 1983 that was 26 miles long and 7 miles deep surfaced forcing the Lost River Valley to slide away from Mt. Borah.  The valley subsided 9 feet after the quake.

Driving towards Mt. Borah, Idaho's highest peak
Driving towards Mt. Borah, Idaho’s highest peak
Lost River Mountains, Idaho
Lost River Mountains, Idaho

Funny thing — along the way I came across a fence about 40 yards or more covered with boots and shoes….

Boot Fence near Mount Borah
Boot Fence near Mount Borah
Boot Fence with Mount Borah in background
Boot Fence with Mount Borah in background

Continuing south on US 93 i rolled into the small town of Mackay (prounounced MacKee locally).

Welcome to Mackay, Idaho
Welcome to Mackay, Idaho
Downtown Mackay, Idaho
Downtown Mackay, Idaho
Mine Hill Grill, Mackay, Idaho - home of the "World Famous Burnt Lemonade"
Mine Hill Grill, Mackay, Idaho – home of the “World Famous Burnt Lemonade”

Mackay is home to the Mackay Mine Hill which still allows tours, some of them apparently pretty grueling.

More slow tractors - started the day off with one...ending the day with another. This is Idaho.
More slow tractors – started the day off with one…ending the day with another. This is Idaho!

I made my way down US 93 back thru Arco and then to US 26/20 until the junction with Idaho 33, where I then proceeded east back towards Rexburg thru the small town of Howe.

Out of the mountains and into the sagebrush
Out of the mountains and into the sagebrush on ID 33 east towards Rexburg.
Scenic cinder Hills and Shadows as seen on Idaho Hwy 33
Scenic shadowy hills as seen on Idaho Hwy 33

This was a 13 hour road trip with an amazing diversity of scenery, geography and landscapes.  Probably one of the more amazing day trips I have ever taken to this point in terms of variety and excitement.  I really could have spent three days doing this and really digging in deeper.  Maybe next time….

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