Quirky and Offbeat Roadside Attractions – BOOK UPDATE

Hey friends – I spent most of Labor Day weekend trying to finish up my SECOND BOOK! All about Quirky and Offbeat Roadside Attractions, this book will be about 150 pages and have over 80 full color photos. It looks like the book will retail for about $25. It will be paperback with glossy paper.  I hope you can let me know via a comment or instant message on Facebook/Twitter/LinkedIn if you are interested.

I had to cut the book down from 320 pages due to the prohibitive cost (yes, I have a start on Book 3 already!!!).  I have inserted the cover (above) and four sample images (below) so you can see what the book will be like. (Thanks to Antsy McClain for the artwork on the cover.) As my Self-publisher CreateSpace is migrating over to Kindle Direct Publishing, I will not even be able to make the book available for Pre-Order until the beginning of October.

THANKS IN ADVANCE for your input.

(65)

April 2018 Cross-Country Road Trip: Dignity of Earth and Sky Statue in South Dakota

Sumoflam with Dignity near Chamberlain, SD

I love having the opportunity to come upon new and unplanned discoveries in my roadtrips.  While traveling, I constantly check my Roadside America app (which is available for iPhone download here) which has a handy dandy location finder and will tell you the closest of their featured attractions.  While driving through South Dakota near Chamberlain, I did so and came across “Dignity: A 50 foot-tall Indian Woman” statue entry.  Turns out it is located at a rest area near Chamberlain, SD overlooking the Missouri River valley way below.  It was also a Lewis and Clark stopover.

Dignity: Of Earth and Sky – 50 foot tall statue by Dale Lamphere
Dignity statue as seen from below

Dignity (a.k.a. Dignity of Earth & Sky) is a 50-foot high stainless steel statue by South Dakota artist Dale Lamphere that depicts an indigenous woman in Plains-style dress receiving a star quilt. The massive sculpture honors the culture of the Lakota and Dakota peoples who are indigenous to South Dakota.   Lamphere notes on his website:

“Dignity represents the courage, perseverance and wisdom of the Lakota and Dakota cultures in South Dakota. My intent is to have the sculpture stand as an enduring symbol of our shared belief that all here are sacred, and in a sacred place. My hope is that the sculpture might serve as a symbol of respect and promise for the future.”

Giant foot of Dignity
Blackfeet Warriors by Jay Polite Laber, in East Glacier, Montana

I am always interested in things about the various Native American tribes.  Having worked as a tour guide in Arizona, I became somewhat expert on the Navajo and Hopi as well as the old Anasazi cultures.  My travels across the United States and Canada have allowed me to pass through many Native American reservations and lands.  In these travels I have come across many large statues dedicated to these great indigenous peoples (such as the Hiawatha statue in Ironwood, MI – which stands 52 feet tall and the Standing Brave statue in Big Cabin, OK – which is also nearly 50 feet tall).  And of course, in an earlier post on my April road trip, I mentioned the “Whispering Giants” series by Peter Toth, of which I have seen more than a dozen. And there are the Blackfeet Warrior metal sculptures that are at all four entries to the Blackfeet Reservation in Montana. The 44 foot tall Keeper of the Plains in Wichita, Kansas is another good one.  I believe the tallest Native American statue is the 62 foot tall Indian of Skowhegan in Skowhegan, Maine, which I have not visited.

Sumoflam with Hiawatha in Ironwood, MI
Giant Indian Chief “Standing Brave” in Big Cabin, OK
Visiting the Whispering Giant at Starved Rock State Park in Illinois
The Dignity quilt

Back to Dignity – Representing the rich Native American culture of South Dakota, the 50-foot Native American woman wears a dress that is patterned after a two-hide Lakota or Dakota dress of the 1850s. She also holds a quilt that has 128 stainless steel blue diamond shapes designed to flutter in the wind. Apparently, the quilt was also bedecked with LED lights that cause the diamond shapes to glow in the night sky which can be seen from Interstate 90 (which I would have loved to have seen).  The quilt is very impressive as you can see in the photo on the left as well as the expanded one below.

Dignity with Quilt
Dignity Face
With Dignity

Dignity is not only 50 feet tall, but her base is 16 feet deep (to help withstand the strong South Dakota winds on this bluff) and is 32 feet wide.  The statue weighs in at nearly 11 tons and cost over $1 million dollars to make. The money was kindly donated by a couple from nearby Rapid City, South Dakota. The statue was officially dedicated in September 2016. It is truly a sight to see and I was so glad to have been on this highway.

Keeper of the Plains – 44 foot tall statue in Wichita

At 50 feet tall, the statue is one of the 25 tallest statues in the United States.  I have been to 13 of the 25 including #2 – Statue of Liberty in NYC (151 ft tall); #4 – Our Lady of the Rockies in Butte, MT (88.6 ft. tall); Tuo Phat Quan Am in Houston, TX (72 ft. tall); Brachiosauraus in Indianapolis, IN (70 ft. tall); Giraffe at Dallas Zoo, Dallas, TX (67.6 ft tall); A Tribute to Courage – Sam Houston in Huntsville, TX (67 ft. tall); Christ of the Ozarks in Eureka Springs, AR (65.5 ft. tall); Stephen F. Austin in Angleton, TX (60 ft. tall); Hiawatha in Ironwood, MI (52 ft. tall); Standing Tall in Big Cabin, OK (50 ft. tall); Paul Bunyan and Babe in Bemidji, MN (49.2 ft. tall); Hammering Man in Seattle, WA (48 ft. tall);  and The Keeper of the Plains in Wichita, KS (44 ft. tall).

The view from Dignity is impressive as it overlooks the Missouri River valley down below.  This was also a Lewis and Clark observation point.

Missouri River Valley near Chamberlain, South Dakota
Lewis and Clark Plaque at overlook behind Dignity

Finally, I would like to note that South Dakota is proud of its tourism and especially its numerous sculptures which would include the famed Mt. Rushmore, the giant Crazy Horse statue still under construction and the giant brontosauraus at Wall Drug. They have a website especially focused on the sculptures of South Dakota called the South Dakota Sculpture Trail.

In closing, I want to note that in my upcoming book (hopefully to be released at the end of June), I will have a complete chapter on Native American statues and art.

ENJOY THE RIDE!  CHOOSE HAPPY!

If you like what you see, you may want to check out my book: Less Beaten Paths of America: Unique Town Names, available on Amazon.  My second book, Less Beaten Paths of America: Quirky and Offbeat Roadside Attractions, is currently being worked on and I hope to make it available in late  June 2018. Click on the photo below for more details or to get a copy of the book.

Books 1 & 2

(92)

Beatles in the South – Arkansas/Texas: February 2018

Sumoflam with the Beatles in Walnut Ridge, AR

It is not every day that one takes a road trip and comes across not one, but two memorials to the famed Beatles.

The first of these is a fascinating little story about a small little town in Arkansas named Walnut Ridge (population abt 5000). It was in 1964 and the Beatles were in the midst of their first tour of the United States. On September 18 of that year they had just finished performing in Dallas, TX and were in for a well-deserved break. A rich rancher from Missouri named Reed Pigman had a nice little dude ranch in Alton, Missouri (see the Pigman story here). Pigman also had a charter plane and flew the Beatles into the closest airport that could handle their large airplane. It was the Walnut Ridge, Arkansas airport.

Walnut Ridge, Arkansas

Somehow, some teen fans heard about it and when the Beatles returned from their visit to the Pigman ranch and to the airport on September 20, there was quite a little crowd there to greet them and see them off as they flew onto New York for their final shows. There were a few photos taken and a few autographs signed before the Beatles headed east. It was apparently the only time the Beatles ever set foot in the state of Arkansas.

British Flag Fire Hydrant on Abbey Road in Walnut Ridge
Yellow Submarine on Abbey Road
This way to Beatles Park at the corner of US 67 and Abbey Rd. in Walnut Ridge, AR
Welcome to Walnut Ridge

This little event left such an impact on the town that a whole street and a little town square in Walnut Ride is dedicated to the Beatles. There is a beautiful sculpture in Beatles Park with the Beatles doing their walk across Abbey Road. Titled “The Beatles Abbey Road Sculpture,” this piece was created by local artist Danny West (who also owns the little yogurt shop and coffee shop on Abbey Road) and is about 10 feet by 200 feet. The street has permanently been named Abbey Road and the sculpture is at 110 Abbey Road. (See more here)

The Beatles Abbey Road Sculpture in Beatles Park. Artwork by Danny West
The Beatles sculpture from a different angle
Artist Danny West is also the owner of the Art and Culture Yogurt shop and The Dark Side Coffee shop, next door to the park

According to Beatles at the Ridge Website:

The entire street scene is featured, along with more than 30 hidden references to Beatles song titles and album names. There are also a few hidden surprises that were added in by the artist that are unique to our city, and tie the whole sculpture to our town.  As lighting changes throughout the day, the hidden details in the sculpture reveal themselves to the observer, and at night, under the powerful lighting, the scene takes on a surreal quality, and more secrets can be seen.

The Imagine Shop on US 67 and Abbey Road
Darkside Coffee artwork of Ringo
Some art made from musical instruments at the entrance of the Darkside Coffee house
Scene from Abbey Road, Walnut Ridge, AR
Imagine

There are also shops named after Beatles songs such as “Imagine.” And, in this one little section there are also wooden cutouts of the Beatles, a painting on a window of the Beatles album and a lot of little history and trivia regarding the Beatles.

The town even has a musical festival and other events as well as a different park commemorating other musicians on Route 67.

The Guitar Walk recognizes some famous musicians who had performed along US 67 (dubbed the Rock and Roll Highway)
Large Guitar sidewalk
Rock and Roll Highway, Route 67 in Walnut Ridge, AR
Hi there John!

I don’t think that the Beatles ever made their way back into Walnut Ridge either as a group or as individuals, But I am sure that they would be honored by the dedicatory art and imagination that the people of this small community have put together. For Beatles fans, it is just another drawing card and a unique place to stop, which I did!

The Beatles in Houston, statues by Houston artist David Adickes

A few days later, I was in Houston and intentionally went downtown so that I could see another Beatles dedication that I’ve always wanted to see for the last few years. It is a set of four large, nearly 36 foot tall statues of John, Paul, George and Ringo created by Houston artist David Adickes, whom I have referred to in previous posts on this blog (see my post on the Three Giants of Texas). These statues have been moved to a couple of locations and currently reside in the parking lot of local 8th Wonder Brewery. I was able to get up close and personal with the statues, get some nice selfies and get a few other angles.

The Beatles statues by David Adickes, currently on display outside Houston’s 8th Wonder Brewery
George Harrison
John Lennon
Paul McCartney
Ringo Starr
Alternate View with the 8th Wonder Truck to give a better idea of the size
The Beatles from behind the fence (what you would see if the gate were locked)
Another view of John Lennon

When I departed for my trip to Texas in early February 2018, I had indeed hoped to visit the Beatles statues in Houston, but had no idea about the Walnut Ridge story. Thanks to my trusty RoadsideAmerica app, it made for a unique theme to this long and winding road trip from Kentucky through the back roads of Missouri, Arkansas, Texas and Oklahoma.

I loved this…ya, ya, ya!!

 

Get the Roadside America App!

(57)