Montana Road Trip: Zipping across North Dakota on US Highway 2




US Route 2 in North Dakota
US Route 2 in North Dakota

I continue my series on my Montana road trip and my drive along US Route two across the northern border from Michigan to Montana.

Welcome to North Dakota
Welcome to North Dakota

As one progresses further west after leaving Minnesota, you soon discover that the land is flatter, full of prairies and grasslands and not as many lakes and streams as one would see in Minnesota.

US Route 2 in North Daota
US Route 2 in North Dakota

I spent the night in Grand Forks, North Dakota and then proceeded to head west early in the morning. The first thing I did was look for the famed Smiley Water Tower in Grand Forks. Unlike others with a similar smiley on them, this one has a smiley face on the one side and a winking smiley face on the other. It is always wonderful to start the day off with a smile!

Grand Forks Smiley Water Tower
Grand Forks Smiley Water Tower
Winking Smiley on backside of Water Tower in Grand Forks
Winking Smiley on backside of Water Tower in Grand Forks

After driving around Grand Forks for just a little bit, I proceeded forward on my drive and, for the first time since starting on US Highway 2, I deviated from the route to head north to an unusual destination. If you need advice on speed limits in this area, you may get it from here.

US Route 2 heading west towards Niagara, ND
US Route 2 heading west towards Niagara, ND

Before heading north I passed through Niagara, ND and a stop at the historic monument for the Old Fort Totten Trail which was used by the Sioux to assist in delivering mail.  From here I proceeded to Petersburg, ND, another old small town.  I came across their old Curling Club building.  Who said that Curling was only a Canadian sport?

Petersburg Curling Club, Petersburg, ND
Petersburg Curling Club, Petersburg, ND

A few more miles down Highway 2 I went through the town of Michigan, ND (population 425)…returned to Michigan after a couple of days (hehehe).

Michigan, ND
Michigan, ND

Michigan, ND has a Barn Quilt Trail, which is common in Kentucky, Indiana and Tennessee, but I have not really seen these in other states in my travels.

Barn Quilt Trail in Michigan, ND
Barn Quilt Trail in Michigan, ND
Quilt Block on a Barn in Michigan, ND
Quilt Block on a Barn in Michigan, ND

Finally, before heading north off of US Highway 2, I passed through the town of Lakota, ND.  This town is about 60 miles west of Grand Forks.  From here I would head north on ND Hwy 1.

Welcome to Lakota, ND
Welcome to Lakota, ND
Crossing the tracks in Lakota, ND...looking west
Crossing the tracks in Lakota, ND…looking west

Contrary to what many may believe about North Dakota, I was quite surprised by what I saw on ND Highway 1.  All along the way there were many small ponds surrounded by grasses and filled with ducks and many other birds and wildlife.

Duck in a pond on ND Highway 1
Duck in a pond on ND Highway 1
An old truck rests by one of the many ponds along ND Highway 1
An old truck rests by one of the many ponds along ND Highway 1
A Red-Winged Blackbird rests on straw by a pond along ND Hwy 1
A Red-Winged Blackbird rests on straw by a pond along ND Hwy 1
Male and female duck enjoy a swim in a pond along ND Hwy 1
Male and female duck enjoy a swim in a pond along ND Hwy 1

One of my “goal destinations” in North Dakota was to see the unique pyramid near Nekoma.  Actually, the pyramid is part of a larger installation called the Stanley R. Mickelson Safeguard Complex (SRMSC).  This complex was the United States’ first operational ABM (anti-ballistic missile) defense system.

The SRMSC as seen from ND Hwy 1 about 5 miles south of Nekoma, ND
The SRMSC as seen from ND Hwy 1 about 5 miles south of Nekoma, ND

The Mickelsen Safeguard complex was deployed during the 1970s to defend the offensive Minuteman missiles based at Grand Forks Air Force Base in the event of a nuclear ICBM attack by the Soviet Union or China. Depending on the threat, the system could also provide a limited defense of a wider geographical area, including other offensive Minuteman missile fields as well as civilian population centers. It was operational for approximately eight months.

SRMSC from 2 miles south of Nekoma, ND as seen from ND Hwy 1
SRMSC from 2 miles south of Nekoma, ND as seen from ND Hwy 1
Sumoflam and Pyramid
Sumoflam and Pyramid

This unique facility is fascinating to look at.  The pyramid was actually called the Missile Site Radar (MSR) installation.  It used the target trajectory and classification data from the Perimeter Acquisition Radar (PAR) along with additional data supplied by its multiface phased array radar. This site provided additional surveillance and target tracking and also performed the function of track and guidance for the Sprint and Spartan missiles.  Following is a video that explains some of what happened in the 1970s.

The pyramid shaped MSR is by far the most unique building on the site. The 80 foot high truncated pyramid “turret” of the MSR gave the radar its ability to see in all directions and is the only visible part of the MSCB. The MSCB underground areas held additional radar equipment and the data processing and command/control systems. The adjacent underground power plant provided the generating capacity to operate the MSR’s battle management systems.

The Pyramid Shaped MSR of the Mickelson facility
The Pyramid Shaped MSR of the Mickelsen Safeguard Complex
MSR and power buildings
MSR and power buildings

The pyramid was not the only thing of interest in the area.  Nekoma, ND was the support town for the facility, though most of the staff came from the nearby Grand Forks Air Force Base.

Welcome to Nekoma, ND
Welcome to Nekoma, ND
Old buildings in Nekoma, ND
Old buildings in Nekoma, ND
Pain Reliever Bar, Nekoma, ND
Pain Reliever Bar, Nekoma, ND
International Pain Reliever Bar in Nekoma, ND
International Pain Reliever Bar in Nekoma, ND (notice they used a New Mexico flag and not the Mexican flag….)

Nekoma is also the home of the Langdon Wind Farm which has 106 Wind Turbines, some of them right up on the Mickelsen Safeguard complex. In the middle of prairie lands, it offers unique views.

Silo and Wind Turbine near Nekoma, ND
Silo and Wind Turbine near Nekoma, ND
Langdon Wind Farm Info Center near Nekoma, ND
Langdon Wind Farm Info Center near Nekoma, ND
Three Structures: Metal silo, old silo, wind turbine
Three Structures: Metal silo, old silo, wind turbine

I continued north on Hwy 1 into Langdon, ND to see if there was anything interesting there.  Langdon is about 15 miles south of the Canadian border and has about 1800 people residing in the town.

Downtown Langdon, ND
Downtown Langdon, ND
ROXY Theatre in Langdon, ND
ROXY Theatre in Langdon, ND
Old truck in Langdon, ND
Old truck in Langdon, ND

As I drove around I found the town park which actually had one of the Spartan missiles used at the complex in Nekoma.  I thought that was unique.

Spartan Missile in the city park in Langdon, ND
Spartan Missile in the city park in Langdon, ND

From Langdon I proceeded to head west on ND Hwy 5 and then south on ND Hwy 20 to pass though Munich, ND.

Welcome to Munich, ND
Welcome to Munich, ND
Unique town sign in Munich, ND
Unique town sign in Munich, ND

From Munich I continued south into Cando, ND to get some Can Do Spirit!!

South on ND Hwy 20 south of Munich, ND
South on ND Hwy 20 south of Munich, ND
Cando, ND
Cando, ND

Cando, ND is one of my token unique named towns.  It got its name as follows:

“…and in virtue of our authority we select this location and name the town ‘Cando’ to show you that we can do it.”

Capt. Prosper Parker
February 14, 1884

Cando Police, Cando, ND
Cando Police, Cando, ND

Cando is also the “Duck Capital of North Dakota.”

Sumoflam Cando!
Sumoflam Cando!
Cando Bar, Cando, ND
Cando Bar, Cando, ND
Audi Theatre in Cando, ND
Audi Theatre in Cando, ND

And there were a couple of interesting things in town….

Randy's Revival Antique Store in Cando, ND
Randy’s Revival Antique Store in Cando, ND
Cando Water Tower
Cando Water Tower

From Cando I headed west on ND Hwy 16 and then south on ND Hwy 3 into Rugby, ND which lays claim to being the geographical center of North America.

ND Hwy 17
ND Hwy 17
Wind Farm near Rugby, ND
Wind Farm near Rugby, ND
Welcome to Rugby, ND
Welcome to Rugby, ND

According to the 1931 U.S. Geological Survey, the geographic center of the North American continent is located approximately 6 miles west of Balta, Pierce County, North Dakota. The approximate coordinates are given as latitude 48* 10′ North, 100* 10′ West. The field stone pillar was erected in 1932 on US Hwy 2 and ND Hwy 3.

Monument for the Geographic Center of North America in Rugby, ND
Monument for the Geographic Center of North America in Rugby, ND (Notice the HUB Motel sign in the background)
Sumoflam in Rugby, ND
Sumoflam in Rugby, ND
Old Neon for the HUB Motel in Rugby, ND
Old Neon for the HUB Motel in Rugby, ND

A few more scenes from Rugby…

Unique Water Tower in Rugby, ND
Unique Water Tower in Rugby, ND
Old Neon for the Bar/Bowling Alley in Rugby
Old Neon for the Bar/Bowling Alley in Rugby
Centre Cinema in Rugby, ND
Centre Cinema in Rugby, ND

I had finally returned to US Hwy 2 and proceeded westward toward my next planned stop which would be Minot, ND. This city is home to the North Dakota State Fair, but, of more interest to me is their celebration of Scandinavian heritage. The annual Norsk Hostfest is the largest festival of its kind in North America and is a tribute the area’s Scandinavian heritage. The Scandinavian Heritage Park is home to a replica of the beautiful Gol Stave Church which currently sits at the Norsk Folkemuseum in Oslo, Norway.

Sumoflam at the replica of the Gol Stave Church in Minot, ND
Sumoflam at the replica of the Gol Stave Church in Minot, ND

The Gol Stave Church Museum, in Scandinavian Heritage Park is a full-size replica of the original church built in about 1250, now in Bygdoy Park in Oslo.  It is all wooden inside and I would call it “immaculately simple” in its architecture.

Dragons atop the Stave Church
Dragons atop the Stave Church
The Gol Stave Church replica and museum at the Scandinavian Heritage Center in Minot, ND
The Gol Stave Church replica and museum at the Scandinavian Heritage Center in Minot, ND
Top of the Stave Church
Detail of the top of the Stave Church
Wooden Gargoyles of the Stave Church in Minot
Wooden Gargoyles of the Stave Church in Minot
Intricate Wood Carving on the Stave Church doors
Detail of the Intricate Wood Carving on the Stave Church doors

The wood carving is intricate and beautiful in this church. This work was apparently done by professional wood carvers Philip Odden and Elsa Bigton of Norsk Wood Works in Barronet, WI.

The 30 foot tall Dala Horse at the Scandinavian Heritage Center in Minot
The 30 foot tall Dala Horse at the Scandinavian Heritage Center in Minot

A stone’s throw from the Stave Church is the 30 foot Dala Horse which is apparently the most recognized Swedish symbol in the world. In central Sweden, wood scraps from the local furniture-making trade, paint-pigment from nearby copper mines, and long winter evenings bred the development of the Dala Horse. Traditions vary in giving credit to woodsmen and to soldiers for originating the craft. Dala Horses from the Nusnäs-Mora area first appeared with their familiar bright decoration in the 1800’s when the kurbit, or flower patterned saddle, was regularly added to them. There is actually a website dedicated to the Dala Horse.

Dala Horse and one of many buildings at the Scandinavian Cultural Heritage Park
Dala Horse and one of many buildings at the Scandinavian Cultural Heritage Park
Sumoflam with Dala Horse
Sumoflam with Dala Horse

From Minot I continued on to Williston, ND.  This is the heart of the North Dakota oil industry and “fracking.”  There are about 200 drilling rigs in the area. (Read an interesting article about this from National Geographic).

Heading west to Williston, ND on US Hwy 2
Heading west to Williston, ND on US Hwy 2
An old house as seen on the road to Williston
An old house as seen on the road to Williston

Along the way I got a photo of this old homesteader’s house in the prairies.  In the background you can see an oil well pump.

Welcome to Williston, Boom Town USA
Welcome to Williston, Boom Town USA

Williston is a modern Boomtown as “roughnecks” make their way to the town for oil jobs. North Dakota has the second highest level of GDP per capita, generating about $69,000 in economic activity per resident. Only Alaska ranks higher as a result of this oil boom of the 21st century.

Long term housing projects abound in Williston.
Long term housing projects abound in Williston.
Prefab Buildings for Oil Riggers
Prefab Buildings for Oil Riggers

As I drove into town and through town, I was amazed at the number of “extended stay” hotels, prefab apartments, huge trailer complexes and more that had gone up to house all of the oil workers.

Billboards advertise Oil Supplies
Billboards advertise Oil Supplies
Traffic and road construction menace this once quiet town
Traffic and road construction menace this once quiet town

The other thing I noticed was the terrible traffic and all of the road construction and infrastructure building in a town whose population is now bursting at the seams. The photo above represents the nearly 45 minutes that it took me to drive through the town in almost constant stop/go traffic on the congested roads.

Typical scene in Williston - trucks cruising down dusty dirt roads from the drilling fields
Typical scene in Williston – trucks cruising down dusty dirt roads from the drilling fields
An oil rig in Williston, ND
An oil rig (or derrick) in Williston, ND

For Fracture Drilling, the oil rig (or derrick) is used to drill both vertical and horizontal portions of the well.  These are actually temporary in nature, and, depending on the well depth and number of wells developed, these will remain on site for a week to as long as eight weeks. There is a great definition of how the complete process works on Halliburton’s website. I saw a number of Halliburton facilities in Williston.  I know this is a controversial process, and I am not condoning or complaining about it here.  I believe that many of us have no idea how it is done.

Heading west to Montana on US Hwy 2 from Williston
Heading west to Montana on US Hwy 2 from Williston

From Williston I headed west into Montana for an overnight stay in Glasgow, Montana.

Welcome to Montana on US Route 2 heading west
Welcome to Montana on US Route 2 heading west
A lonely tree decorates US Hwy 2 east of Culbertson, MT
A lonely tree decorates US Hwy 2 east of Culbertson, MT
An old church building on the horizon east of Culbertson, Montana on US Hwy 2
An old church building on the horizon east of Culbertson, Montana on US Hwy 2
Sun and sky in eastern Montana
Sun and sky in eastern Montana

I finally arrived in Glasgow, Montana late after driving all the way from Grand Forks, ND, about 490 miles. They only had one motel left in town with any availability due to a state softball tournament.  For the first time in ages I stayed in a 60s style motel with neon and a real key for the door on one of those plastic diamonds with the room number.

Staying at the Star Lodge Motel in Glasgow, Montana
Staying at the Star Lodge Motel in Glasgow, Montana

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Montana Road Trip: US Route 2 across Minnesota – Offbeat Paradise

Northern Pike
Northern Pike Statue in Deer River, MN

Traveling US Route 2 across Wisconsin was beautiful and had its share of offbeat and quirky places, but Minnesota’s section of US Route 2 is one to be reckoned with when it comes to quirky and fun destinations on the same road. Entering from Superior, Wisconsin, Route 2 starts south of Duluth and proceeds through Proctor, MN.  From there the road heads northwest into the beautiful lake and birch country that gives Minnesota its name “Land of 10,000 Lakes.”

Before I go any further, I do need to give a SHOUT OUT to fellow travel blogger Seth Hardmeyer, who does the Highway Highlights blog (also see @HHighlights on Twitter and highway_highlights on Instagram).  He provided me loads of information on spots to visit along US Route 2 in Minnesota (though I didn’t have time for them all!).  Give him some love and visit (and LIKE) his sites.

US Route 2 in eastern Minnesota
US Route 2 southwest of Duluth, Minnesota. The birch trees are just getting started in late May.
US Route 2 east of Floodwood, MN
US Route 2 east of Floodwood, MN

My first stop in Minnesota was in Floodwood, about 45 miles west of Duluth.  There are just over 500 folk in this small town, which is known for its Catfish Festival in July.

Sumoflam in Floodwood, Minnesota
Sumoflam in Floodwood, Minnesota

Floodwood claims to be the “Catfish Capital of the World” because of its festival. (There is apparently another place in Mississippi that claims the same…Belzoni, MS).

Floodwood, MN
Floodwood, MN on US Route 2
Floodwood Water Tower claims it is the Catfish Capital
Floodwood Water Tower claims it is the Catfish Capital

Floodwood is the home of the first of three big fish that get bigger and bigger the further west you go.  They have a moderately sized catfish statue in the city park as one enters town. Always a great photo op….

Catfish Statue of Floodwood, MN
Catfish Statue of Floodwood, MN

This wooden statue has a sign claiming it to be the Catfish Capital of the World.  It also has another “In Memory of Joseph T. Karpik” who was apparently a local-grown inventor with a couple of patents. He was the President of Floodwood company Mat, Inc. which makes erosion control products.

Sumoflam hangs with the Floodwood Catfish
Sumoflam hangs with the Floodwood Catfish

From Floodwood the highway enters pine and birch forests as one gets closer to Grand Rapids.

Pine trees along US Route 2 between Floodwood and Grand Rapids, MN
Pine trees along US Route 2 between Floodwood and Grand Rapids, MN
US Route 2 in northern Minnesota between Floodwood and Grand Rapids
US Route 2 in northern Minnesota between Floodwood and Grand Rapids

Next stop along Route 2 is Grand Rapids, MN.  The town is a well known tourist spot for outdoorsmen, but is probably better known as the Birthplace of Judy Garland, though I found no Yellow Brick Roads!

Welcome to Grand Rapids, Birthplace of Judy Garland
Welcome to Grand Rapids, Birthplace of Judy Garland

First thing I saw as I entered town was a giant Adirondack chair which is apparently called “Paul Bunyan’s Big Chair.”  It was dedicated in October 2013, so its a fairly new attraction, though there had been a smaller one there built in 2008 that eventually became dilapidated.  The chair is at the main intersection of US Route 2 and Pokegama Ave.

Paul Bunyan Big Chair in Grand Rapids, Minnesota
Paul Bunyan Big Chair in Grand Rapids, Minnesota

To get to Judy Garland’s birthplace I turned left on Pokegama Avenue and made my way to the “Land of Oz” which is the home of the Judy Garland Museum.

Follow the brown wood sign...and look at the Yellow Brick Road mural
Follow the brown wood sign…and look at the Yellow Brick Road mural
Welcome to the Land of Oz in Minnesota...we're not in Kansas anymore...
Welcome to the Land of Oz in Minnesota…we’re not in Kansas anymore…
Sumoflam at Judy Garland birthplace in Grand Rapids, MN
Sumoflam at Judy Garland birthplace in Grand Rapids, MN
Judy Garland Museum in Grand Rapids, MN
Judy Garland Museum in Grand Rapids, MN
Judy Garland Birthplace placard in Grand Rapids, MN
Judy Garland Birthplace placard in Grand Rapids, MN

After the brief photo ops and a quick stop for lunch in Grand Rapids, it was Westward Ho on Route 2 again.  I was headed for Deer River, home of the next big fish statue – a larger than life Northern Pike with a toothless grin.

Great Northern Pike statue in Deer Park, MN
Great Northern Pike statue in Deer River, MN
Sumoflam and his fish friend "Pike" in Deer Park, MN
Sumoflam and his fish friend “Pike” in Deer River, MN

While in Deer River I came across two classic neon signs for the Bahr’s Motel, which apparently sat on the grounds behind my fish friend. All that remains are the two signs. I did find a photo of the old 60s style motel here.

Bahr's Motel sign one on US Route 2 in Deer River, MN
Bahr’s Motel sign one on US Route 2 in Deer River, MN
Bahr's Motel sign on the location where the motel used to be in Deer River, MN
Bahr’s Motel sign on the location where the motel used to be in Deer River, MN

Continuing west along the lakes and the woods I collected 1000s of bugs on the front bumper as I passed by Ball Club, MN, my sole “unique town name” for the day.

US Route 2 West near Ball Club, MN
US Route 2 West near Ball Club, MN
Ball Club, MN
Ball Club, MN

The majority of the community is populated by Native Americans of the Leech Lake Band of Ojibwe, but I am not sure how the town got its name. The Mississippi River surrounds Ball Club on both the East and West side of the community. Indeed, the Mississippi up here is not “mighty” at all as it meanders its way from its headwaters nearby.

US Route 2 east of Bena, MN near "Big Winnie"
US Route 2 east of Bena, MN near “Big Winnie”

Traveling through the Chippewa National Forest I enjoyed the cool breeze and fresh smells of the trees and lakes.  Then, out of nowhere came this interesting site called the “Big Winnie General Store” which is a national historic landmark. According to some histories, the store was built in 1932 by Ernest Flemming, but he apparently got some design sketches from none other than Frank Lloyd Wright. According to the link noted above “The unique architecture of the store was influenced by a world-renowned architect. Back in the early 1930s, Frank Lloyd Wright was staying on Lake Winnibigoshish when Flemming and Wright met and got to know each other. Flemming explained that he was looking to build a store outside the Bena city limits and wanted an Asian and Bavarian look to the building.”

Big Winnie General Store, Bena, MN
Big Winnie General Store, Bena, MN
Old Cabins at Big Winnie
Old Cabins at Big Winnie

Just down the road is another “Big”…in fact, it is the “Big Fish Supper Club.” I am not sure how the food is there, but there is certainly a BIG FISH there!!  This toothy muskie appeared in the opening credits of National Lampoon’s “Vacation” with Chevy Chase. (Ironically, this movie was also filmed in Flagstaff, AZ and Monument Valley while I worked as a tour guide and I watched them film the scene with Chevy Chase and family driving through the rain near the Grand Canyon.) And here are 25 things you may not have known about “Vacation — just for fun. But I digress, back to the fish….

Big Fish Supper Club, Bena, MN
Big Fish Supper Club, Bena, MN
Long view of the Big Fish in Bena, MN
Long view of the Big Fish in Bena, MN
I love this angle - Big Fish Eats House!!  In Bena, MN
I love this angle – Big Fish Eats House!! In Bena, MN
Sumoflam and Big Fish in Bena, MN
Sumoflam and Big Fish in Bena, MN
Fish Food
Fish Food
Complete view of the Big Fish Supper Club and the Big Fish in Bena, MN
Complete view of the Big Fish Supper Club and the Big Fish in Bena, MN

Indeed, this is the kind of site a quirky roadtrip should have.  But US Route 2 in Minnesota certainly was not finished providing amazingly fun road trip stops.  Next stop….Bemidji, MN!

Welcome to Bemidji, Minnesota
Welcome to Bemidji, Minnesota

Bemidji, Minnesota is one of the ultimate “quirky places” to visit in Minnesota, but perhaps in the U.S.!  In fact, I will have a feature post of Bemidji with many more photos and details about the place.  But for now, here is the real story for me:

Life Magazine article on Bemidji and Paul Bunyan statue in February 1945
Life Magazine article on Bemidji and Paul Bunyan statue in February 1945

My whole fascination with travel and the birth of my wanderlust can be traced back to 1963 when I was flipping through a book about the U.S. that was published by LIFE Magazine.  Almost all of the photos were black and white in the book, but I was determined that one day I would see the sites.  One of the ones that struck me as “exotic” as a 7 year old was the Paul Bunyan picture (as shown above).  The photo above was taken from the 1945 issue which they have in the Visitor’s Center and which I held in my hands.  My 50 year old dream had come true as I made my way to one of the oldest “roadside attractions” in the country (this one was made in 1932!!). History of this unique attraction can be seen HERE.

Sumoflam at Paul Bunyan statue in Bemidji, Minnesota - Dreams can come true!
Sumoflam at Paul Bunyan statue in Bemidji, Minnesota – Dreams can come true!

I have written more about all of this in my special feature blog post on Bemidji (CLICK HERE).

Paul Bunyan and Babe in Bemidji, MN
Paul Bunyan and Babe in Bemidji, MN

These sculptures are at the Visitor’s Center in Bemidji, which also has the “Fireplace of States”. The Fireplace of States was constructed in 1934-35 under the U.S. Federal Works Program. In 1995, this fireplace was moved to its present location in the new Tourist Information Center on the Lake Bemidji waterfront.

Fireplace of States in Bemidji, MN
Fireplace of States in Bemidji, MN
Detail of Fireplace of States in Bemidji, MN
Detail of Fireplace of States in Bemidji, MN

Besides the Paul Bunyan, Bemidji does have a number of other things to see and do, much of which I didn’t have time for.  Though covered much more in my Bemidji feature post, here are a couple of more unique sites from Bemidji:

Nanobojo, Muffler Man Indian in Bemidji, MN
Nanobozho, Muffler Man Indian in Bemidji, MN

A big Muffler Man statue was converted to an Indian Muffler Man just across the street from Paul Bunyan’s statue.  It is apparently supposed to be of Nanabozho, a Paul Bunyan nemesis.

Nanabozho was considered a spirit father among the Ojibwe tribe. He most often appears in the shape of a rabbit and is characterized as a trickster. He was sent to Earth by Gitchi Manitou to teach the Ojibwe. One of his first tasks was to name all the plants and animals. He is also thought to be the inventor of fishing and hieroglyphs. This deity is a shape-shifter and a co-creator of the world. There are myths among the Ojibwe that tell how Nanabozho saves the forests from Paul Bunyan. The story goes that they fought for forty days and nights, and that Nanabozho killed Bunyan with a Red Lake walleye.

Niimii the Pow Wow Dancer in Bemidji, MN
Niimii the Pow Wow Dancer in Bemidji, MN

Nanabozhou is not the only Native American representation in Bemidji.  As part of the Bemidji “Sculpture Walk” series, this piece was created by Wanda Odegard.  Niimii is a 12 foot tall northern traditional Powwow Dancer made of steel. The traditional head piece is the essence of a large porcupine hair roach. Niimii wears a breast plate made of metal pipes which in real life they would be made of bone.

Pete the Curler by Dale Lewis - one of 25 pieces in the 2014 Sculpture Walk
Pete the Curler by Dale Lewis – one of 25 pieces in the 2014 Sculpture Walk

Bemidji has been doing their Sculpture Walk since 1999 and there are a number of unique pieces around town.  I took shots of many of them and will include them in my more detailed Bemidji post. Here is one last one for this post — there is also a nice map of the Sculpture Walk HERE.

Hinkypunk by Chris Gustafson, part of the Bemidji Sculpture Walk
Hinkypunk by Chris Gustafson, part of the Bemidji Sculpture Walk

It was getting later in the day so I had to move westward and continued my trek across Minnesota on US Route 2.

US Route 2 east of McIntosh, MN
US Route 2 east of McIntosh, MN

I made way into McIntosh after passing a few other small towns.  I had to stop for the metal rooster (one of four or five I have now captured in road trips). I also liked the huge historic wall mural in the town.

Metal Rooster in McIntosh, MN
Metal Rooster in McIntosh, MN
McIntosh Water Tower
McIntosh Water Tower
Wall Mural in McIntosh, MN
Wall Mural in McIntosh, MN

From McIntosh it was on to Crookston, MN, the last town before North Dakota.  The town has a huge Ox Cart as you roll in from the east.  They celebrate an annual Ox Cart Days in Crookston. There is also a nice Welcome Mural in town.

Crookston Ox Cart, Crookston, MN
Crookston Ox Cart, Crookston, MN – celebrates the history of the Pembina Trail
Welcome to Crookston mural in Crookston, MN
Welcome to Crookston mural in Crookston, MN

Next post will cover US Route 2 across North Dakota.

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