Everywhere a Sign – Some WELCOME Signs From 2018 #AtoZChallenge

Well, the Blogging Challenge is winding down.  It has been a wild and wacky challenge for me.

Through the month I have provided readers with a wide variety of wonderful signs which I wandered upon during the year.  As I do with all of my posts, I try to be witty and wry in my presentation. I hope that I have brought out the wanderlust in my readers as well.  This post will be all about Welcome Signs. Please now enjoy my special edition of W Signs from my travels over the years.  Enjoy the Read. Enjoy the Ride.

Welcome Signs Everywhere!

Welcome to my happy place…traveling everywhere

I love feeling welcome in places!  Perhaps one of my bigger “collections” of place signs along the highways of America are the Welcome signs to states, communities and places.  Here are just a few of the dozens and dozens have wandered upon in my travels.  This post features welcome signs taken from 2005 to present.  Want everyone to feel Welcome.

Welcome to my Welcome Blog Post
Welcome to Oklahoma

 

Welcome to Carew Tower Sign in Carew Tower Elevators, Cincinnati
Welcome to Henry, Illinois
Welcome to Kentucky, home sweet home
Welcome to Dime Box, Texas
Welcome to Zelienople-Harmony, Pennsylvania
Welcome to Kingston, Washington
Welcome to Punkyville, Kentucky… near Falmouth, Kentucky

We all know who is really Nice! Nice, CA

Welcome to Nevada sign in Denio, Nevada
Welcome to Leavenworth, Washington
Welcome to Shiner, Texas
Kabetogama Lake – Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota
Welcome to Gauley Bridge, West Virginia
Welcome to Cave City, Kentucky… gateway to Mammoth Cave National Park
Welcome to Tonica, Illinois
Welcome to the Monongahela Incline in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Welcome to Millersburg, Ohio
Welcome to Butte, Montana
Welcome to Big Stone Gap, Virginia
Welcome to Dublin, OH, Home of Wendy’s
Welcome to Estill County, Kentucky
Welcome to Santa Claus, Indiana
Welcome to West, Texas
Welcome to Alligator, Mississippi
Welcome to Silver Gate, Montana
Welcome to Choteau, Montana sign
Welcome to Metropolis, Illinois
Welcome to the Rockpile Museum in Gillette, Wyoming
Welcome to Council Bluffs, Iowa
Welcome to New Mexico at Raton Pass
Welcome to Damascus, Virginia
Welcome to Wyoming sign on US 30
Welcome to What Cheer, Iowa
Welcome to Winner, South Dakota – Pheasant Capital of the World
Welcome to Hope, Arkansas – birthplace of Bill Clinton
Welcome to Pittsburgh
Welcome to Viborg, South Dakota
Welcome to Hell, Michigan
Welcome to Peculiar, Missouri
Welcome to Sisters, Oregon
Welcome to Yellville, Arkansas
Welcome to Boring, Oregon
Welcome to Earth, Texas
Welcome to Vulcan, Alberta sign in Klingon
Welcome to Mystic Seaport, Mystic, Connecticut
Welcome to Seymour, Wisconsin Home of the Hamburger
Welcome to Pella, Iowa
Welcome to Montana in West Yellowstone
Welcome to Clallam Bay and Sekiu, Washington
Welcome to Stanley, Idaho
Welcome to Colorado at WY 789 and CO 13
Welcome to Bemidji, Minnesota
Welcome to Crawford, Nebraska
Welcome to Sharkheads in Biloxi Beach, Mississippi
Welcome to Salem Sue in New Salem, North Dakota
Welcome to Paris, Tennessee Catfish – they claim to be the Catfish Capital
Welcome to Real Goods, a great store in Hopland, California
Welcome to Kountry Korner’s Krazy Kreatures in Kingston, Washington
Welcome to Orr, Minnesota
Welcome to Mena, Arkansas
Welcome to White Castle, Louisiana
Welcome to New Hampshire in Sept 2015 – State #49!
Welcome to Gourdough’s Donuts in Austin, Texas
Welcome to Vermont, near Brattleboro on Vermont Hwy 142 — the 50th state I visited
Welcome to Kansas
Welcome to Alvin, Texas, hometown of Nolan Ryan
Welcome to West Virginia
Welcome to Kensington District of Toronto, Ontario

 

Welcome to Whitetop, Virginia
Welcome to Delaware…first time since 1986. Visited in 2016 during Christmas Holiday
Welcome to Heini’s Cheese Factory in Charming, Ohio
Welcome to Uranus, Missouri
Welcome to Hopkinsville, KY for the Solar Eclipse 2017
Welcome to Egg Harbor, Wisconsin
Welcome to Huntsville, Texas
Welcome to Wilsall, Montana (with the Welcome Bird on top of the sign!)
Welcome to Crookston mural in Crookston, Minnesota
Welcome to Cokeville, Wyoming
Welcome to Gregory, South Dakota
Welcome to Mars, Pennsylvania
Welcome to Talent, Oregon
Welcome to Pascagoula, Mississippi, Birthplace of Jimmy Buffet
Welcome to Waterville, Washington
Welcome to Canonsburg, Pennsylvania
Welcome to Ketchikan, Alaska … from my wife
Welcome to the Guitar Walk at Cavanaugh Park in Walnut Ridge, Arkansas
Welcome to Dienner’s Country Restaurant in Amish Country, Ronks, Pennsylvania
Welcome to Granbury, Texas
Welcome to North Dakota
Welcome to Hugo, Oklahoma… home of the country’s only cemetery dedicated to Circus Performers
Welcome to North Carolina
Welcome to Papa Joe’s Oasis, Crescent Junction, Utah
Welcome to Hochatown, Oklahoma
Welcome to Doolittle, Missouri
Welcome to Nitro, West Virginia
Welcome to Hipp Station of the Holmes County Rails to Trails in Millersburg, Ohio
Welcome to Pierre Part, LA, home of the TV Show Swamp People
Welcome to the Oyster Capital of the World, South Bend, Washington
Welcome to the Corn Palace…Mitchell, South Dakota
Welcome to Sweet Home Alabama with some of my grandchildren in early 2017
Sumoflam in Floodwood, Minnesota
Welcome to Luling, Texas
Welcome to Washington, Pennsylvania
Welcome to Jackson, Wyoming!!
A giant troll sculpture greets you at the Mount Horeb, Wisconsin Welcome Center. Created by Wally Keller
Welcome to Oacoma, South Dakota
Welcome to the Seattle Waterfront
Welcome to Hemingford, Nebraska
Welcome to Saco, Montana, birthplace of 1960s newscaster Chet Huntley
Welcome to Nekoma, North Dakota
Welcome to Jackson Center, Ohio. Home of Airstream
Welcome to Rabbit Hash, Kentucky
Nicholson, Pennsylvania’s welcome sign features the famous Viaduct
Welcome to Chelsea, Michigan
Welcome to Lost Springs, Wyoming Population 1 in 2007. Population 4 in 2017.
Welcome to Chinook, Montana
Welcome to Dallas, South Dakota where the main street goes under the water tower
Welcome to Buffalo, Wyoming
Welcome to Salida, Colorado
Welcome to Swedesburg, Iowa
Welcome to Steubenville, Ohio, a small town full of murals and history
Welcome to Montana on US Route 2 heading west
Welcome to Missouri
Welcome to Salt Lake City, Utah
Welcome to Walnut Ridge, Arkansas…home of the Rock N Roll Highway
Welcome to Wall, South Dakota, home of Wall Drug. Now you know where the heck it is.
Welcome to Many, Louisiana Not just a few here!
Welcome Sign in Indianapolis, Indiana
Welcome to Gold Bar, Washington Gateway to the Cascades
Welcome to Virden, Manitoba
Welcome to Saskatchewan
Welcome to Vulcan, Alberta Sept 2007 (look for me…)
Welcome to Beachville, Ontario…birthplace of Baseball
ENJOY!

Like what you see? Well, there is lots more!  I currently have two books about offbeat and quirky places to take on your road trips. You can see both of my books at http://amzn.to/2ks6fQZ. Working on Book 3, coming in late Spring 2019!!

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A Grab Bag from America’s Back Roads – The W Things #AtoZChallenge

In 2018 I  will feature a random (yet alphabetical) selection of photos I have taken from my nearly 20 years of back roads travel in the United States and Canada.  I may even throw in a few random shots from other trips to Japan, Mexico and the Philippines. My theme is called America’s Back Roads: A Grab Bag of Places in Pictures.

 

Let’s start this off with a Whispering Bang!!

Whispering Giants – art by Hungarian artist Peter Toth – Idaho Falls, Idaho; Bethany Beach, Delaware; Murray, Utah; Red Lodge, Montana; Ottawa, Illinois; Hopewell, Illinois; Paducah, Kentucky; Astoria, Oregon; Ocean City, Maryland; Iowa Falls, Iowa; Utica, Illinois

Over 62 of these around the U.S.  Here are the ones I have seen:

Gigantic Peter Toth carved Indian Head in North Tourist Park in Idaho Falls, Idaho. Placed in 1980
Chief Little Owl in Bethany Beach, Delaware placed in 2002
Chief Wasatch in Murray, UT placed in 1985
Detail of the “Whispering Giant” of Red Lodge, Montana, placed in 1979
Ho-Ma-Sjah-Nah-Zhee-Ga in Ottawa, IL, placed in 1990
Hopewell Giant in Hopewell, IL placed in 1975
Chief Wacinton in Paducah, KY placed in 1985
Ikala Nawan in Astoria, Oregon placed in 1987
The Inlet Indian, Nanticoke, dedicated to the Assateague tribe, is in Ocean City, MD and placed in 1976
Whispering Giant of Iowa Falls, IA in Veterans Park, placed in 1999
Chief Walks With The Wind in Starved Rock State Park, Utica, IL

Wigwam Village – Sleep in Wigwam – Cave City, KY

Wigwam Village, Cave City, KY
Wigwam Village Key
Sleep in a Wigwam neon sign in Cave City, KY
Hanging with ALL 10 Grandkids at Wigwam Village in Cave City, KY

Wahkeena Falls – Corbett, Oregon

Wahkeena Falls in Corbett, Oregon

Wupatki National Monument – near Cameron, Arizona

Son Seth at Wupatki Ruins off of US 89 south of Flagstaff in 1992

Water Buffalo – Cebu, Philippines

Carabao Water Buffalo taken on Cebu Island in the Philippines

Winnett, Montana

Winnett, MT Welcome Sign
Old Store Front – Winnett, MT
Old Hotel Sign – Winnett, MT

Wallace, Idaho

Wallace, Idaho
Wallace Corner Hotel, Wallace, ID
Downtown Wallace, Idaho

Weatherford, Texas

Courthouse in Weatherford, Texas
Skinnys Hamburger sign in Weatherford, TX
Relaxing – Weatherford, Texas

Murals of Welland, Ontario

Mural of Grandfather telling stories about Welland to Grandson
A portion of a massive mural on the side of a shopping mall. Entitled “History of the Niagara Peninsula” by Heinz Gaugel
“Main Street” by Mike Svob
“Wagons” by Andrew Miles

Washington, Pennsylvania

Washington, PA Historic Marker
Washington County Courthouse in Washington, PA
Welcome to Washington, PA

Williams, California

Williams Hotel mural by John Ton in Williams, CA
Detail of a mural on the side of a building in Williams, CA

Winner, South Dakota

Winner Winner..no chicken dinner, just the name of a town in SD
Winner, South Dakota
Pheasant Statue, Winner, SD
Pheasant Bar, Winner, SD

Waldo, Arkansas

Waldo Post Office, Waldo, AR
Waldo, Arkansas
Waldo Water Tower

Winterset, Iowa

Welcome to Winterset, Covered Bridge Capital of Iowa
Winterset building fronts
Roseman Covered Bridge in Winterset, Iowa

Wyoming Dinosaur Center – Thermopolis, Wyoming

Large Sign about the Dinosaur Center in Thermopolis, Wyoming

World Trade Center (before 9/11) – New York City

In New York City in 1990 before the World Trade Center Twin Towers met their demise
World Trade Center 1990

One World Trade Center (after 9/11) – New York City

One World Trade Center all lit up at night, as seen from Sinatra Park in Hoboken, NJ
One World Trade Center under construction – March 2, 2013

Wall Drug – Wall, South Dakota

Where the Heck is Wall Drug?
Welcome to Wall, SD
One of many Wall Drug Billboards – notice the uniqueness?
The 80 foot tall Wall Drug Brontosaurus

West Virginia Capital Building with the gold dome – Charleston, West Virginia

Wonde West Virginia’s Capital Building in Charleston, WV
WV Capital Building

Wharton, Texas

Black History Mural by Dayton Wordrich
Buildings in downtown Wharton, TX
Future of Wharton, TX Mural by Dayton Wordrich
Old Plaza Theater in Wharton, TX

Wonderland Road – Upton, Kentucky

Sumoflam at Wonderland Rd. in Upton, KY

Winter Wheat – Sparta, Ontario

Welcome to Winter Wheat in Sparta, ON
Winter Wheat Main Building
Broom People at Winter Wheat in Sparta, ON
The performance room at Winter Wheat

Walpi, Arizona

While working in Arizona I made over 100 trips to Walpi on the Hopi Indian Reservation in Northern Arizona

White Sands National Monument – east of Alamagordo, New Mexico

White Sands National Monument
Visiting White Sands, NM in 2013
Granddaughter Joselyn runs on a sand dune at White Sands National Monument in NM

Walnut Ridge, Arkansas

Walnut Ridge, Arkansas
Sumoflam with the Beatles in Walnut Ridge, AR
Welcome to Walnut Ridge
Scene from Abbey Road, Walnut Ridge, AR

Wendy’s Museum – Dublin, Ohio

Dave Thomas statue at Wendy’s in Dublin, OH
The Wendy’s Original $150,000 Crystal Cheeseburger created by Waterford Crystal
“Where’s the Beef?” memorabilia from the famed advertising campaign in the Wendy’s Museum in Dublin, OH

Wigwam Drive-In – Ravenna, Kentucky

Sumoflam at the Wigwam Drive-In in Ravenna, KY
Interior of the Wigwam Drive-in Ravenna, KY
The Famous Country Boy Burger

Washington Court House, Ohio

The Washington Court House in Washington Court House, OH was one of many unique buildings I got to visit in 2016
Washington Courthouse Statue

Whitetop, Virginia

Welcome to Whitetop, VA
Whitetop Station
All of us at Whitetop Station at the beginning of the 10 mile downhill Virginia Creeper Bike Trail near Damascus, VA

West Side Theater – Newman, California

West Side Theatre – a common stop for Antsy McClain and the Trailer Park Troubadours

Wimpy’s Hamburgers – Dallas, Texas

Wimpy’s Hamburgers – Dallas, Texas – I’ll gladly pay you Thursday for a hamburger today….

Walcott Castle – Walcott, Iowa

Castle Hall in Walcott, IA
One of the Towers on Castle Hall in Walcott

Wind Farms – Shelby, Montana; Nekoma, North Dakota; Adair, Iowa; Bloomington, Illinois; Iona, Idaho; Rugby, North Dakota; Port Burwell, Ontario

An old cabin falls apart in the midst of the giant wind turbines of the Glacier Wind Farm near Shelby, Montana

A silo and wind turbine coexist near Nekoma, ND
Wind Turbines of the Rolling Hills Wind Farm near Adair, IA
Wind Farm near Bloomington, IL
Approaching Wolverine Creek Wind Farm, near Iona, ID
Wind Turbines seem to blossom like flowers out of the corn fields of Iowa
Wind Farm near Rugby, ND
Wind Farm info center in Port Burwell, Ontario
Wind Farm near Shelby, Montana

Watkins Glen State Park – Watkins Glen, New York

One of over 50 waterfalls in Watkins Glen State Park, NY
Watkins Glen State Park, New York

Wilbur, Washington

Wilbur, Washington
Billy Burger, Wilbur, WA
Big Pig and Spider at Welcome center in Wilbur, WA

Winnemucca, Nevada

Sumoflam in Winnemucca, Nevada
Big casino in Winnemucca, Nevada
Driving through Winnemucca

Mount Washington – Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Mount Washington
Panoramic View of Pittsburgh from atop Mt. Washington

West Yellowstone, Montana

Welcome to West Yellowstone, Montana
Westward Motel – West Yellowstone
Dude Motel – West Yellowstone, Montana

Whiskey Rebellion – Washington, Pennsylvania

Whiskey Rebellion Statue in Washington, PA

Webster Falls – Hamilton, Ontario

Webster Falls near Hamilton, ON
Sumoflam at the top of Webster Falls, Hamilton, Ontario

White Castle, Louisiana

Welcome to White Castle, LA
There is a White Castle Fire Dept, but no White Castle restaurants to be seen

Worland, Wyoming

Highway into Worland, WY
Mammoth Bronze Statue by Chris Navarro in Worland, WY

Working Women mural – Welland, Ontario

“Working Women” by Ted Ziegler shows the contribution of women to the industrial
work force in the factories of Welland

Wolf Creek Pass – Colorado

Wolf Creek Pass in Colorado July 1993

Wind River Canyon – Wyoming

History of the Wind River Canyon
One of many spectacular views of Wind River Canyon
Entering Wind River Canyon on US 20 from Thermopolis, WY

Walking to the Sky Sculpture – Pittsburgh, Penssylvania

“Walking to the Sky” by Jonathan Borofsky

Washington Monument – Washington, D.C.

The Washington Monument and the US Capitol in Washington DC in 2016

Willie the Walleye – Baudette, Minnesota

Son Solomon (at 6’3″) at Willie the Walleye in Baudette, MN

Wichita, Kansas

Welcome to Wichita mural
Donut Whole – Wichita, Kansas
Keeper of the Plains – 50 foot tall statue in Wichita
Wicked Street Art in Wichita, KS

What Cheer, Iowa

What Cheer, Iowa
What Cheer, Iowa
Downtown What Cheer – many abandoned buildings

If you like what you see, you may want to check out my book: Less Beaten Paths of America: Unique Town Names, available on Amazon.  My second book, Less Beaten Paths of America: Quirky and Offbeat Roadside Attractions, will be available in late April or early May 2018. Click on the photo below for more details or to get a copy of the book.

Books 1 & 2

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Highway 61 Visited – Day 2: Vicksburg, MS to Galveston, TX

Sumoflam at US 61 south just south of Tunica, MS
Sumoflam at US 61 south just south of Tunica, MS
TNMSDay2
Map of travels from Vicksburg, MS down US 61 to Natchez, MS and then thru Louisiana and on to Galveston, TX via the Bolivar Peninsula.

Highway 61 in Mississippi may be called the Blues Highway, but there is much more to it than the Blues.  After my first long drive from Kentucky to Vicksburg, I woke up early the next day to visit the Vicksburg National Military Park before heading south on Highway 61.

Cannon line the grounds of Vicksburg National Military park in many places
Cannon line the grounds of Vicksburg National Military park in many places

The park preserves the site of the American Civil War Battle of Vicksburg, waged from May 18 to July 4, 1863 and also commemorates the greater Vicksburg Campaign, which preceded the battle. The expansive park includes 1,340 historic monuments and markers, 20 miles of historic trenches and earthworks, a 16-mile tour road, 144 emplaced cannons, a restored gunboat (the USS Cairo which sunk on December 12, 1862, on the Yazoo River, recovered successfully in 1964), and more. The Illinois State Memorial has 47 steps, one for every day Vicksburg was besieged.

One of the hundreds of monuments in the park
One of the hundreds of monuments in the park

Nearly 95% of the 1,340 monuments, markers, tablets and plaques,  were erected prior to 1917.

Stephen Burbridge bust in Vicksburg Military Park
Stephen Burbridge bust in Vicksburg Military Park. He was also known as “Butcher” Burbridge or the “Butcher of Kentucky”, was a controversial Union Major General during the American Civil War.

I drove a good part of the main road through the park and didn’t have lots of time to stop and look at all of the monuments, plaques and other items.  I kind of just shot those that struck me as unique or interesting. Following are a few more

Wisconsin 18th Infantry Monument
Wisconsin 18th Infantry Monument
Sculpture at Vicksburg
Sculpture at Vicksburg
The Union Obelisk at Vicksburg with the sun gleaming behind
The Union Obelisk at Vicksburg with the sun gleaming behind
Sculpture at Vicksburg
Sculpture at Vicksburg
Sculpture at Vicksburg
Sculpture at Vicksburg

One of the most visited locations on the property appears to be the Illinois Memorial. It was dedicated on October 26, 1906. There are forty-seven steps in the long stairway, one for each day of the Siege of Vicksburg. Modeled after the Roman Pantheon, the monument has sixty unique bronze tablets lining its interior walls, naming all 36,325 Illinois soldiers who participated in the Vicksburg Campaign.

Illinois State Memorial at Vicksburg
Illinois State Memorial at Vicksburg
Golden Eagle sits on top of the Illinois State Memorial at Vicksburg
Golden Eagle sits on top of the Illinois State Memorial at Vicksburg
Relief sculpture on top of the Illinois Memorial in Vicksburg
Relief sculpture on top of the Illinois Memorial in Vicksburg

There are apparently 144 cannon emplaced throughout the grounds. These were placed strategically such that one can envision what it may have been like during the war.

Sumoflam and Cannons at Vicksburg National Military Park
Sumoflam and Cannons at Vicksburg National Military Park – Illinois Memorial in background
A lonely cannon sits on a hill at Vicksburg
A lonely cannon sits on a hill at Vicksburg
Cannon and Illinois Memorial at Vicksburg
Cannon and Illinois Memorial at Vicksburg
A line of cannons at Vicksburg
A line of cannons at Vicksburg
Cannons in the trees in Vicksburg
Cannons in the trees in Vicksburg
A plaque explains the firepower of the cannons
A plaque explains the firepower of the cannons

A few other scenes from Vicksburg’s Military Park

Obelisk with sculpture
Obelisk with sculpture
One of the views of the battlefields
One of the views of the battlefields
Entry arch at Vicksburg
Entry arch at Vicksburg.  The Memorial Arch was sculpted by Charles Lawhon using Stone Mountain (GA) granite, and was dedicated in 1920.
Ohio Monument at Vicksburg
Ohio Monument at Vicksburg
A portion of Vicksburg National Cemetery
A portion of Vicksburg National Cemetery

Indeed, an entire day could be spent visiting the numerous monuments, historical sites and cemeteries at Vicksburg.  Further, a complete blog post could be dedicated to this powerful Civil War park.  But, there is more in Vicksburg than just this park.

The Biedenharn Coca Cola Museum in Vicksburg
The Biedenharn Coca Cola Museum in Vicksburg

One usually thinks Atlanta when thinking about Coca Cola.  But, not too far removed from the National Military Park is the Biedenharn Coca Cola Museum. The museum houses a wide variety of exhibits interpreting the beginnings of Coca-Cola, the history of the Biedenharn family, the process used to first bottle Coca-Cola, a reproduction of the equipment first used to bottle Coke, the history of Coca-Cola advertising, and Coca-Cola memorabilia from past to present.

Biedenharn Museum Sign
Biedenharn Museum Sign
Lots of Coca Cola memorabilia at Biedenharn Coca Cola Museum
Lots of Coca Cola memorabilia at Biedenharn Coca Cola Museum
Old Hotel Sign on side of The Vicksburg
Old Hotel Sign on side of The Vicksburg

As with my many other trips, I am always on the lookout for wall murals.  There are a number along a wall that parallels the train tracks.  Hard to get to from my location that day, I snapped a few shots through the fence.  Not my favorite way to do things….

Vicksburg Wall Mural
Vicksburg Wall Mural dedicated to Cotton
Wall mural of The Vicksburg Hotel
Wall mural of The Vicksburg Hotel
Another Wall Mural in Vicksburg
Another Wall Mural in Vicksburg
Vicksburg Wall Mural
Vicksburg Wall Mural

And finally…something to smile about….beautiful tree flowers on a tree in Vicksburg

Flowering Tree in Vicksburg
Flowering Tree in Vicksburg

After the lovely morning spent in Vicksburg it was time to continue south on US Hwy 61.  The drive from Vicksburg south had many more trees and was more scenic than the northern Mississippi section of US Hwy 61.

Tree lined Hwy 61 south of Vicksburg, MS
Tree lined Hwy 61 south of Vicksburg, MS

The next stop along the way was the scenic little town of Port Gibson, MS. The town has some lavish 19th century homes and some unique places as well.

Welcome to Port Gibson, MS
Welcome to Port Gibson, MS
Old Courthouse in Port Gibson, MS
Old Claiborne County Courthouse in Port Gibson, MS

Many of the town’s historic buildings survived the Civil War because Grant proclaimed the city to be “too beautiful to burn.” These words appear on the town’s welcome signs, as shown above.  Historic buildings in the city include the Windsor Ruins, which have been shown in several motion pictures. Unfortunately, they were quite a drive out of town and my scheduled didn’t allow for me to take that detour.

An old 19th century house in Port Gibson with a double chimney
An old 19th century house in Port Gibson with a double chimney – built in 1817
Monument to the Confederate soldiers from Claiborne County, Mississippi.
Monument to the Confederate soldiers from Claiborne County, Mississippi. Stands in front of the courthouse

Perhaps one of the most unique things I saw in Port Gibson was the steeple of the First Presbyterian Church. It is definitely a one of a kind steeple!

Unique Steeple of the First Presbyterian Church in Port Gibson, MS
Unique Steeple of the First Presbyterian Church in Port Gibson, MS

The “Hand Pointing to Heaven” is the unique feature of this Romanesque Revival style edifice. The first hand was carved from wood by Daniel Foley, a young local craftsman. The ravages of time, however, destroyed it; and around 1901, the present hand was commissioned and installed. It was taken down in 1989 to be repaired and replated. It was raised again in 1990 and placed atop a newly re-enforced steeple.

Close up of Port Gibson's First Presbyterian Church's "Hand Pointing to Heaven" steeple
Close up of Port Gibson’s First Presbyterian Church’s “Hand Pointing to Heaven” steeple
Hand Pointing to Heaven
Hand Pointing to Heaven

Of course, like many of the Hwy 61 towns, Port Gibson is steeped in Blues Music tradition. The Rabbit’s Foot Company (also known as the Rabbit’s Foot Minstrels) was established in 1900 by Pat Chappelle, an African-American theatre owner in Tampa, Florida, who owned the leading travelling vaudeville show, with an all-black cast of singers, musicians, comedians and entertainers in the southern states. After his death in 1911, the company was taken over by Fred Swift Wolcott (1882-1967), a white farmer, who based the touring company in Port Gibson after 1918 and continued to run it until 1950. The Rabbit’s Foot Company remained popular, but was no longer considered “authentic.” A historic marker on the Mississippi Blues Trail has been placed by the Mississippi Blues Commission in Port Gibson, commemorating the contribution that The Rabbit’s Foot Company made to the development of the blues in Mississippi.

Rabbit Foot Minstrel marker in Port Gibson, MS
Rabbit Foot Minstrel marker in Port Gibson, MS
Old building that housed the Rabbit Foot Minstrels in Port Gibson, MS
Old building that housed the Rabbit Foot Minstrels in Port Gibson, MS

There are other remnants of the past that can be seen in this little town on the Mississippi.

Old Trace Theater in Port Gibson, MS
Old Trace Theater in Port Gibson, MS

Used as a movie theater in the past, it was closed but in the 1980s the  ‘WestSide TheAter” served as a night club and entertainment spot, even as late as 2011 (according to Facebook).

Old Neon Sign for Red Goose Shoes in Port Gibson, MS
Old Neon Sign for Red Goose Shoes in Port Gibson, MS

This old relic of a neon sign above is actually more than it shows.  In fact, it is also a relic of the early 1900s Jewish heritage that once thrived in Port Gibson, MS.  According to a 1991 article in the New York Times, “The first Jews came to Port Gibson in the 1840’s from German states and Alsace-Lorraine. They were itinerant peddlers, carrying their wares in 75-pound packs on their backs. Then, as Port Gibson began competing with Vicksburg and Natchez in both commerce and the glory of its antebellum homes, the Jewish community became a bulwark of the town’s economy, and newspaper advertisements were filled with names like Bernheimer, Marx, Meyer, Cahn, Traxler and Ullman.” The old neon sign reading H. Frishman-Red Goose Shoes is all that remains on a building now occupied by Mississippi: Cultural Crossroads, a community center mostly serving the town’s predominantly black youth. The only other remnant of the once thriving Jewish heritage is the old synagogue with a Moorish Dome, which was restored in 1991.

Old Gemiluth Chassed synagogue in Port Gibson
Old Gemiluth Chassed synagogue in Port Gibson

Today, Port Gibson appears to be predominantly black in population.  Most, if not all, of the Jews moved away years ago.  Scenes like the man on the porch below were quite common on my trip.  It was obvious that poverty thrives in these small Mississippi towns.

A man on porch in Port Gibson, MS
A man on porch in Port Gibson, MS
A sign of the past, this Ghost Sign for Claiborne Hotel in Port Gibson, MS
A sign of the past, this Ghost Sign for Claiborne Hardware in Port Gibson, MS. In the 1960s this hardware store was wrangled in a lawsuit with the NAACP for discrimination.
Large Wall Mural in Port Gibson, MS
Large Wall Mural depicts history of Port Gibson, MS

After my long visit to Port Gibson, I was back on US 61 heading south towards Natchez, MS.  On the way I stopped by the “Old Country Store” in Lorman…more for a look see than to stop and eat (mainly because I had plans to stop at another cool place to eat just down the road — see below!). They claim to have the “World’s Best Fried Chicken.”

Old Country Store and Restaurant in Lorman, MS
Old Country Store and Restaurant in Lorman, MS

Though I honestly missed out due to schedule, I did learn that people travel for hours to partake of Mr “D”s ‘Heavenly Fried Chicken’.  On their menu: An all-you-can-eat lunch buffet is served from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. seven days a week. The buffet includes fried chicken and other meats (sometimes catfish and ribs), tossed salad, cucumber/tomato salad, potato salad, coleslaw, mac & cheese, corn on the cob, green beans, turnip greens, dirty rice, field peas, sweet potatoes, dressing and cornbread. All for about $10. And owner Arthur Davis (Mr. “D”) entertains diners by singing a song about his Grand Mama’s cornbread. Sounds fun and too bad I didn’t have the time!

Old Country Store inside
Old Country Store inside
Some old rusty vintage signs at Old Country Store
Some old rusty vintage signs at Old Country Store
Entering Natchez, MS
Entering Natchez, MS

A visit into Natchez was really not meant to be, so I continued south of of town to the Mammy’s Cupboard Cafe….the epitome of vintage novelty architecture.

Mammy's Cupboard in Natchez, MS
Mammy’s Cupboard in Natchez, MS

Built in the 1940s, this unique place is a MUST SEE and MUST STOP destination if anywhere close.

Sumoflam at Mammy's Cupboard
Sumoflam at Mammy’s Cupboard south of Natchez, MS
Mammy's Cupboard Sign
Mammy’s Cupboard Sign – says their cornbread made from the original pan…
Off the Eaten Path" from Southern Living Magazine
Not quite “Less Beaten Paths” but the place was featured in “Off the Eaten Path” from Southern Living Magazine….

The woman’s skirt holds a dining room and a gift shop. The skirt is made out of bricks, and the earrings are horseshoes. She is holding a serving tray while smiling. Mammy’s Cupboard has been through several renovations, the exterior has been repaired and the interior refurbished.

Mammy's Cupboard Dining Room - Much bigger than it looks on the outside
Mammy’s Cupboard Dining Room – Much bigger than it looks on the outside

All of the food is home made.  I had a nice sandwich with their wonderful homemade bread.  But their homemade cake was to die for!!  I couldn’t resist….

Homemade Cake at Mammy's Cupboard in Natchez, MS
Homemade Cake at Mammy’s Cupboard in Natchez, MS
One last look at Mammy's Cupboard south of Natchez, MS
One last look at Mammy’s Cupboard south of Natchez, MS

From Natchez I finished the last leg of the Mississippi portion of US 61 through Woodville and into Louisiana.

South on US 61...last few miles in southern Mississippi
South on US 61…last few miles in southern Mississippi
Passing thru Woodville, MS before leaving the state
Passing thru Woodville, MS before leaving the state

And into Louisiana….

Welcome to Louisiana on US Hwy 61
Welcome to Louisiana on US Hwy 61

From the Louisiana/Mississippi border I continued south towards Baton Rouge.  From the highway the tallest State Capitol Building in the US can be plainly seen.

Heading towards Baton Rouge
Heading towards Baton Rouge
Louisiana State Capitol Building as seen from US Hwy 61
Louisiana State Capitol Building as seen from US Hwy 61 (sorry, a bit blurry…)

I continued past Baton Rouge into Plaquemine, LA, where I would finally leave Hwy 61 and get on Louisiana Hwy 1.  Another town worth a visit, no time on this trip to explore.

Heading to Plaquemine, LA
Heading to Plaquemine, LA
Welcome to Plaquemine, LA
Welcome to Plaquemine, LA

As I noted above, I didn’t have time to visit Plaquemine because I had another objective on this portion of the trip. First off, I exited onto Louisiana Hwy 1, the longest numbered highway of any class in Louisiana.  This is a scenic byway along the Mississippi River, which I took into White Castle, Louisiana before heading south into bayou country on the back roads.

Louisiana Highway 1
Louisiana Highway 1
Welcome to White Castle, LA
Welcome to White Castle, LA

White Castle, the town, was carved out of the George Wailes Plantation “White Castle”. The 1883 Charles H. Dickinson Survey of several parishes of Louisiana shows the “White Castle” Plantation property. Nearby is the plantation property of John H. Randolph called “Nottaway”.

There is a White Castle Fire Dept, but no White Castle restaurants to be seen
There is a White Castle Fire Dept, but no White Castle restaurants to be seen

In White Castle I turned south on Louisiana 69 which enters the Atchafalaya Swamp, the largest wetland and swamp in the United States. Ultimately, my goal was to go hunting for “Swamp People.” It is an interesting story and I actually created a full post on it HERE.  Once Hwy 69 hits Hwy 70 I took that south into the small bayou town of Pierre Part, LA. The town was founded by Acadian French (Cajun) settlers around 1755, during which much of the French population of Acadia was expelled by its British conquerors. The town remained isolated from most of the world, since it is surrounded by water and was inaccessible by land until the mid-twentieth century. Before the Great Depression, the inhabitants of Pierre Part were fishermen. Very few people continue the traditional ways of fishing and living off the land with each generation, but one that does is the Landry family (including Troy, who is noted in my previous post.)

Bayou swamps abound in Pierre Part, LA
Bayou swamps abound in Pierre Part, LA
Egrets forage in a field in Pierre Part, LA
Egrets forage in a field in Pierre Part, LA
A trailer on the Bayou (if you are an Antsy McClain fan you'll get this)
A trailer on the Bayou (if you are an Antsy McClain fan you’ll get this)

As noted, my hope was to track down and meet Troy Landry…the whole purpose for going through Pierre Part.  I found him at the family bait shop/gas station (Duffy’s Shell on LA 70).  The whole story is on my “Swamp People” post.  But here is a photo of me with Troy…a bucket list item now checked off.

Sumoflam and Swamp People's Troy Landry...one of the friendliest and most personable guys you'll ever meet (Troy that is...)
Sumoflam and Swamp People’s Troy Landry…one of the friendliest and most personable guys you’ll ever meet (Troy that is…)

After my short visit there, I made my way down a back road just a tad south of Duffy’s.  Once I got to Shell Beach Road, I detoured to head towards P’Maws Bait Shack, a really offbeat and fun place.  This place is the site of the Animal Channel’s SWAMP’D Reality TV Show (which I have never seen).  I had hoped to meet P’maw as well, but he wasn’t there.  This place is open 24 hours.  There is a fun video of P’Maw giving a fishing report:

Of course, I have photos of the place too!

A dragonfly greets me at the entrance to P'maws in Pierre Part, LA
A dragonfly greets me at the entrance to P’maws in Pierre Part, LA
P'MAWS Bait Shack in Pierre Part, LA
P’MAWS Bait Shack in Pierre Part, LA
Now this is a Gator Boat!
Now this is a Gator Boat!
P'MAWS is open 24/7
P’MAWS is open 24/7
Visiting P'Maws in Pierre Part...home of another TV show from Animal Channel called Swamp'd
Visiting P’Maws in Pierre Part…home of another TV show from Animal Channel called Swamp’d
Cuddling with a White Gator at P'MAWS in Pierre Part, LA
Cuddling with a White Gator at P’MAWS in Pierre Part, LA
Green slimy swamp at P'MAWS...the Swamp Thing could come out any minute!
Green slimy swamp at P’MAWS…the Swamp Thing could come out any minute!
This was the closest thing I saw resembling a gator when in Pierre Part
This was the closest thing I saw resembling a gator when in Pierre Part

One thing I had hoped to see in Pierre Part was a live gator.  No luck…and I drove along a good part of the swamp.  Oh well, off to Galveston.  I continued south on LA 70 to Morgan City and US 90.  I then headed west on US 90, passing by New Iberia (I had hoped to visit the Tabasco plant but it was too late).  I continued northwest towards Lafayette, LA and just kept rolling in order to get to Galveston at a decent hour.

US 90 Heading west to Texas
US 90 Heading west to Texas
Welcome to Texas
Welcome to Texas
Sumoflam in the Lone Star State
Sumoflam in the Lone Star State

By this time it was nearing 7 PM and I still had a ways to go, so I jumped on I-10 west towards Lake Charles, LA and Beaumont, TX, since it would be the fastest. Once in Beaumont, I continued southwest towards Winnie, TX.  I then headed south on TX 124 with the intention of driving along the Gulf Coast on the Bolivar Peninsula.

Wetlands and sunset as seen on TX 124 south of Winnie, TX
Wetlands and sunset as seen on TX 124 south of Winnie, TX

I finally hit the Gulf around 9 PM and the sunset was amazing.  Pelicans flew overhead and I could smell the salt in the air as I drove along with my window open to hear the waves crashing a few yards to my left.

Sunset as seen from TX 87 on the Bolivar Peninsula northeast of Galveston
Sunset as seen from TX 87 on the Bolivar Peninsula northeast of Galveston

The road ends at Port Bolivar where you need to drive on to a Ferry to cross the inlet to Galveston Bay.

GalvestonMapI got there and was third in line, but many more cars followed.  I waited about 20 minutes for the ferry.  But, when they loaded the cars I was put first in line.  Really cool!!

On the Bolivar Ferry to Galveston
On the Bolivar Ferry to Galveston – the lights in the background are in Galveston
My car is first in line...as seen from up on the Ferry Deck
My car is first in line…as seen from up on the Ferry Deck
Proof I was on the Ferry
Proof I was on the Ferry
Exiting the Ferry into Galveston
Exiting the Ferry into Galveston

I got into Galveston late, but much of the family was still out and about.  My next post will be about my visit to the wonderful island of Galveston, TX.

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