A Grab Bag from America’s Back Roads – The L Things #AtoZChallenge

In 2018 I  will feature a random (yet alphabetical) selection of photos I have taken from my nearly 20 years of back roads travel in the United States and Canada.  I may even throw in a few random shots from other trips to Japan, Mexico and the Philippines. My theme is called America’s Back Roads: A Grab Bag of Places in Pictures.

 

Lost Springs, Wyoming (Was Population 1, now Population 4)

Visited Lost Springs, WY, Pop 1 in 2007. Went back in 2014 and it had grown 400% to Pop 4. And yes, I have a photo of that sign too!
Lost Springs in 2014 – ironically I was wearing the same shirt 7 years later!!!
Lost Springs Store and Post Office, Lost Springs, WY

Lake Andes, South Dakota

White Pelicans at Lake Andes in South Dakota

Lambert’s Cafe – Home of Throwed Rolls – Sikeston, Missouri

Sumoflam and wife at Lambert’s Cafe – Home of Throwed Rolls
Lambert’s Cafe – Sikeston, Missouri – big place
Throwing Rolls at Lambert’s

Lima, Montana

Downtown Lima, Montana
“Not the Hotel California” in Lima, Montana

Lexington Cemetery in Spring – Lexington, Kentucky

Spring Colors at Lexington Cemetery

Letchworth State Park – Castile, New York

Letchworth State Park, New York

Lindley Sign Post Forest – Danville, Illinois

Lindley Sign Post Forest Sign
Lindley Sign Post Forest in Danville, IL

Lake Oswego Art Walk – Lake Oswego, Oregon

Large Skelephant, part of the Lake Oswego Art Walk

Lethbridge, Alberta

High Level Bridge in Lethbridge, Alberta was built in 1909. It is 5327 feet long and the largest of its type in the world
Ric’s Grill – Restaurant in a Water Tower – Lethbridge, Alberta

Lawn Order – Nebraska City, Nebraska

Great Name for a Lawn Care Business – Lawn Order

Lincoln Mural – Lexington, Kentucky

Completed Painting on November 15, 2013

Lordsburg, New Mexico

Interstate 10 near Lordsburg, New Mexico

Leland, Mississippi – Birthplace of Kermit the Frog

Birthplace of Kermit the Frog, Leland, MS
Sumoflam at the “Birthplace of Kermit the Frog” in Leland, MS

Lake Wobegon Trail – Avon, Minnesota

Lake Wobegon Trail

Libby’s Pumpkin Factory – Morton, Illinois

Welcome to Morton, Illinois – Pumpkin Capital of the World
We missed the Morton Pumpkin Festival by only a few days.

Lookout, West Virginia

Lookout, WV Post Office

Log Cabin Motel – Ashton, Idaho

Log Cabin Motel – Ashton, Idaho

Lucy in Disguise Costumes – Austin, Texas

Lucy in Disguise, Austin, TX

Louisville, Kentucky

Louisville, KY as seen from across the Ohio River in Indiana
Louisville Bridges
Detail of Noah Church mural in Louisville. Not sure who all of these folks are…

Larry Vennard Iron Sculpture Park – Centralia, Missouri

Sumoflam and Larry Vennard at his Iron Sculpture Park in Centralia, MO
Larry Vennard’s Highway “T” Rex near Centralia, MO
“Dimetrodon” by Larry Vennard

Lostant, Illinois

Id the ant is lost, how do they know which direction it is?

Leif Erikson Statues – Cleveland, Ohio and Duluth, Minnesota

Statue of Leif Erikson in Cleveland, Illinois
Leif Erikson Statue in Duluth, Minnesota

Lava Hot Springs, Idaho

Welcome to Lava Hot Springs, Idaho

Abraham Lincoln Statue – Jackson Hole, Wyoming

Sumoflam and Lincoln in Jackson Hole

Leaning Tree Cafe – Babb, Montana

Leaning Tree Cafe, Babb, Montana
Kade and Charlie, with their Dad Aaron at Leaning Tree Cafe in Babb, MT at the base of Glacier National Park – March 2013

Laboratory, Pennsylvania

Community Honor Roll for Veterans in Laboratory, PA

Large Wooden Trolls – Mt. Horeb, Wisconsin

One of dozens of HUGE trolls in Mt. Horeb, Wisconsin
Ahhh..trolls

Welcome to Louisiana

Welcome to Louisiana on US Hwy 61

Laughing Ladies Cafe – Salida, Colorado

Laughing Ladies Cafe – Salida, Colorado – love the name and the sign

Langdon Wind Energy Center – Langdon, North Dakota

Langdon Wind Farm Info Center near Langdon, ND
Silo and Wind Turbine near Nekoma, ND

Little Big Horn National Monument – Crow Agency, Montana

Grave markers of the US Calvary Soldiers that died at the Battle of Little Big Horn in Little Big Horn National Monument in Montana

Lizard Lick, North Carolina

Lizard Lick, North Carolina
Lizard Lick Towing mural on sign outside of towing place
Lizard Lick lizard on top of gas station

Lucille Ball Birthplace – Jamestown, New York

Lucille Ball Birthplace
Jamestown Banner advertising Lucille Ball Festival

Landry and Lombardi – NFL Coaching Icons – Dallas, Texas and Green Bay, Wisconsin

Legendary Dallas Cowboy Coach Tom Landry (At Cowboys Stadium)
Legendary Green Bay Packers Coach Vince Lombardi (At Lambeau Field)

Longaberger Baskets – Newark, Ohio

Amaree, Solomon and Seth at Longaberger Basket HQ in Newark, OH Fall 1999

Lynn’s Paradise Cafe – Louisville, Kentucky

Unfortunately, this place closed down around 2010 or so.

Sumoflam at Lynn’s Paradise Cafe
Legs on walls at Lynn’s Paradise Cafe

Lovesick Falls – Ontario, Canada

Lovesick Falls in Ontario

Little Italy – Cleveland, Ohio

Little Italy Historic District in Cleveland
Mayfield Road and Random Road, by the little park in Little Italy

Lopatapillar – Butterfly House – Chesterfield, Missouri

Grandkids play on the 30 foot long “Lopatapillar”, created by artist Bob Cassilly at the Butterfly House in Chesterfield, Missouri

Logan’s Shoe Shop Neon Sign – Denton, Texas

Logan’s Shoe Shop Neon, Denton, TX

Lusk, Wyoming

US 20 East out of Lusk, WY
Old Lusk Drive-In Theatre Marquee
Covered Wagon Motel in Lusk, Wyoming

Little River Cafe – Oregonia, Ohio

The Little River Cafe in Oregonia, OH is most easily reached by bike. It is literally on the side of the trail. The road to Oregonia is way out of the way.

Troy Landry – Swamp People icon – Pierre Part, Louisiana

Sumoflam and Troy Landry from Swamp People

LSA Burger Company – Denton, Texas

LSA Burger Company Neon, Denton, TX
Texas Instruments, a unique sculpture at the LSA Burger Co., in Denton
Album Counter at LSA Burger Co.

Lewistown, Montana

Golden Statue of Liberty in Lewistown, Montana
Deer grazing in the snow in Lewistown, Montana
Eagle I saw when driving by Lewistown, Montana (my very first Bald Eagle sighting/photo)

Lund Theatre – Viborg, South Dakota

Lund Theatre – Viborg, South Dakota

If you like what you see, you may want to check out my book: Less Beaten Paths of America: Unique Town Names, available on Amazon.  My second book, Less Beaten Paths of America: Quirky and Offbeat Roadside Attractions, will be available in late April or early May 2018. Click on the photo below for more details or to get a copy of the book.

Books 1 & 2

 

Louisville and Jeffersonville: Ohio River Sisters

Jeffersonville, Indiana
Jeffersonville, Indiana

Two different cities and a shared river and bridge.  In September 2013 one of my daughters and her friends needed some assistance getting to Louisville and had some business to take care of.  So, with camera in hand, we were off and they did their stuff while I drove around Louisville and then across the river to Jeffersonville.  Here are a few the things I saw in a three hour jaunt thru two towns….

Louisville as seen from across the Ohio River in Jeffersonville, IN
Louisville as seen from across the Ohio River in Jeffersonville, IN

This stretch of the Ohio River is the widest and deepest part (about 23 feet) of the Ohio River.

Louisville Slugger headquarters - Louisville, Kentucky
Louisville Slugger headquarters – Louisville, Kentucky

A drive down West Main Street in downtown Louisville offers a number of interesting sights.  You pass by the Art and Museum District of town.  Perhaps the biggest and most interesting site is the amazing Giant Louisville Slugger Baseball Bat at the Louisville Slugger Museum & Factory. The bat replica is actually not made of wood.  It is a 120 foot tall steel bat that weighs over 68,000 pounds. The Big Bat is an exact-scale replica of Babe Ruth’s 34-inch Louisville Slugger bat.

The Big Louisville Slugger Bat in downtown Louisville
The Big Louisville Slugger Bat in downtown Louisville
Closeup of Louisville Slugger Big Bat seal
Closeup of Louisville Slugger Big Bat seal

Ironically, just a mere three blocks away is another “Big Bat”.  This one is located at Caufield’s Novelty Shop and is a huge monstrosity of a hanging vampire bat.  They obviously want to capitalize on the “novelty” factor!

Big Bat at Caufield's Novelty in Downtown Louisville
Big Bat at Caufield’s Novelty in Downtown Louisville

Another business on Main Street, just a couple of doors down from the Louisville Slugger Museum is an advertisement for Kentucky Mirror and Paint Glass with a Giant Baseball going through a Painted Window…

Giant Baseball breaking a Window in downtown Louisville
Giant Baseball breaking a Window in downtown Louisville

Not to be outdone, there is the guy there that could actually use the giant bat and ball and probably fight off that vampire thingy… yes, a giant gold replica of Michelangelo’s “David” statue is a right there on main.

Giant David statue with Louisville Slugger bat in Background
Giant David statue with Louisville Slugger bat in Background
Closeup of David...without the bottom half....
Closeup of David…without the bottom half….

This statue was created by Turkish artist Serkan Ozkaya and was commissioned to be created in Istanbul, shipped to New York and then to Louisville. It certainly must be the largest representation of a male’s complete anatomy in Kentucky and perhaps even the U.S. (See this photo for details if you dare).  The statue is at the 21c Museum Hotel in Louisville, which is a unique contemporary art museum coupled with a boutique hotel. The 21c Museum is North America’s only museum dedicated to collecting and exhibiting contemporary art of the 21st century. The Museum is open free of charge 24 hours a day, seven days a week. More than twenty special exhibitions and installations have been organized by the 21c Museum since its opening in 2006.

21c Hotel Art Car Limo
21c Hotel Art Car Limo
Detail of tile work on the Art Limo
Detail of beadwork on the Art Limo
Pink Penguins can be seen all around the WC21 building
Pink Penguins can be seen all around the 21C building

Learn more about the 4 foot tall Pink Penguins of 21C in this Southern Living article.

Louisville Mural by Bryan Todd
Louisville Mural by Bryan Todd

Mural Artist Bryan Todd completed this giant “Louisville Mural” earlier in 2013. (see article about it).  Around the downtown area and the Highlands district there are other art works…wall murals, street art, etc.

Mural by Louisville artist Noah Church, painted in 2008
Mural by Louisville artist Noah Church, painted in 2008
More of the Noah Church mural in Louisville, KY
More of the Noah Church mural in Louisville, KY

The mural above is a classic piece painted on a retaining wall near Mark’s Feed Store and Ear X-Tacy in Louisville.  Noah has painted a number of murals, many inside cafes and shops around Louisville.  You can see an interview with him here on a mural he was working on in Philadelphia. Following are some detail shots of his whimsical mural.  I have tried to find the story on this one but to no avail…

Detail of Noah Church Mural in Louisivlle
Detail of Noah Church Mural in Louisville
Flying Pig in Noah Church's mural in Louisville
Flying Pig in Noah Church’s mural in Louisville
Duck Head Detail of Noah Church mural
Duck Head Detail of Noah Church mural
Noah Church Mural in Louisville, KY
Noah Church Mural in Louisville, KY
Detail of Noah Church mural in Louisville.  Not sure who all of these folks are...
Detail of Noah Church mural in Louisville. Not sure who all of these folks are…

Another amazing mural can be found at the Artist & Craftsman Supply shop on Barret Avenue.  Just a couple of blocks from the original Lynn’s Paradise Cafe, you can see this huge wall mural from their parking lot. It was painted by Louisville artist Chris Chappell with spray paint (check out a cool time lapse of the work here).

Front entry of Artist and Craftsman Supply store in Louisville with amazing mural artwork
Front entry of Artist and Craftsman Supply store in Louisville with amazing mural artwork by Chris Chappell of Louisville
A detail of the Chappell Mural (and yes, I strategically took this so the tree would look like hair!)
A detail of the Chappell Mural (and yes, I strategically took this so the tree would look like hair!)
Detail of Chappell Mural in Louisville, KY
Detail of Chappell Mural in Louisville, KY
More detail of the Chris Chappell mural in Louisville
More detail of the Chris Chappell mural in Louisville

I found another nice mural on the side of Old Town Liquors on Bardstown Road.  This one is more classic, but nice. Painted by Louisville artists Byron Roberts and Gary Bennett in 2002, it was partially funded by the City of Louisville.  Roberts says of the project “I got my inspiration by standing on a porch in the neighborhood and it presents a perspective of looking inside out.”

Detail of Old Town Liquors mural painted by
Detail of Old Town Liquors mural painted by Louisville artists Byron Roberts and Gary Bennett in 2002
Another detail of the mural at Old Town Liquors in Louisville
Another detail of the mural at Old Town Liquors in Louisville
Detail of Old Town Liquors mural by
Detail of Old Town Liquors mural by Byron Roberts and Gary Bennett
Detail of piano portion of mural on Old Town Liquors in Louisville
Detail of piano portion of mural on Old Town Liquors in Louisville

And a few other odds and ends of art I came across just driving around in Louisville:

Took mural on Ace Hardware store near Bardstown Road in Louisville
Took mural on Ace Hardware store near Bardstown Road in Louisville
Planets mural
Planets mural in Louisville
Some unique street I came across
Some unique street art I came across

Then, in a few places downtown I came across this little guy…apparently somebody’s “tag”

Funny face painted in a number of spots around Louisville
Funny face painted in a number of spots around Louisville

And, to go along with the two “Big Bats” noted earlier, on the other end of Main Street I ran into a Big Batman!

Batman mural in Louisville on Main Street
Batman mural in Louisville on Main Street

Across the street from Batman is the Louisville Slugger Field that has a statue of famed Dodgers shortstop and Louisville native “Pee Wee” Reese.  I remember watching him with Dizzy Dean in the 1960s as they announced the New York Yankees games on CBS.

Pee Wee Reese statue at Louisville Slugger field in Louisville
Pee Wee Reese statue at Louisville Slugger field in Louisville by Louisville artist Raymond Graf

Another unique statue off of main was what I think was an Alice in Wonderland rendition

Alice in Wonderland?
Alice in Wonderland?

While in Louisville I wanted to get a couple of nice shots of the landmark building of Louisville, the Aegon Center building, which is both the tallest and the most noteworthy and recognizable building in Louisville.  It was built in 1993 (I remember well as I was living in Louisville at the time) and is 549 feet tall with 35 floors.

Aegon building - Louisville's tallest building
Aegon building – Louisville’s tallest building
Aegon building dome
Aegon building dome

From Louisville I ventured over the Ohio River into Indiana on the George Rogers Clark Memorial Bridge, that was opened in 1929. The bridge spans over 5700 feet over the river and is one of five bridges from Louisville to Clarksville/Jeffersonville.  I had really never visited Jeffersonville or Clarksville.  My main intent was getting a broad view of Louisville from across the river, but I also was fortunate to see a number of interesting things on the Indiana side of the river….

Clark Memorial Bridge from Louisville to Clarksville and Jeffersonville, IN
Clark Memorial Bridge (US 31) from Louisville to Clarksville and Jeffersonville, IN

On the other side of the river is the colorfully unique Southern Indiana Visitor Center

Southern Indiana Visitor Center - Clarksville, IN
Southern Indiana Visitor Center – Clarksville, IN

Also on this side of the bridge is Water Tower Square…

Water Tower Square in Clarksville, Indiana
Water Tower Square in Clarksville, Indiana

The Clark Memorial Bridge (also referred to as the 2nd Street Bridge in Louisville) has some cool old Art Deco (as if from Superman or Batman) cement pylons. Actually, these columns are identical to each other on each of their respective sides of the bridge. The only differences between the Indiana and Kentucky columns are the state names engraved on the column, as well as each side has their own version of the carved plaque.

Big Entry Pillar on Indiana side of Clark Memorial Bridge
Art Deco Pylon on Indiana side of Clark Memorial Bridge
Art Deco Plaque on Indiana side of bridge
Art Deco Plaque on Indiana side of bridge
Pylon on Kentucky Side of the bridge
Pylon on Kentucky Side of the bridge

Clarksville, Indiana was once a home site to George Rogers Clark (older brother to William Clark of Lewis and Clark fame), and was founded in 1783. It is the oldest American town in the Northwest Territory (the Territory Northwest of the Ohio River). The town is also home to the Colgate clock (seen above behind the water tower), one of the largest clocks in the world. The Falls of the Ohio State Park, a large fossil bed, are also just a short jaunt from the bridge.

Welcome to Clarksville, IN
Welcome to Clarksville, IN
Falls of the Ohio State Park in Clarksville, IN
Falls of the Ohio State Park in Clarksville, IN
Giant Colgate Clock in Clarksville, IN
40 foot tall Giant Colgate Clock in Clarksville, IN

Louisville and the associated Indiana communities—Jeffersonville, Clarksville, and New Albany—all owe their existence as communities to the falls, as the navigational obstacles the falls presented meant that late 18th Century and early to late 19th Century river traffic could benefit from local expertise in navigating the 26-foot drop made by the river over a distance of two miles.

The Falls of the Ohio and the fossil beds along the river
The Falls of the Ohio and the fossil beds along the river
The Fourteenth Street Bridge - a railroad bridge crossing the Ohio River
The Fourteenth Street Bridge – a railroad bridge crossing the Ohio River

The Fourteenth Street Bridge (also known as the Ohio Falls Bridge) was built in 1868 by the Louisville Bridge and Iron Company and was operated for many years by the Pennsylvania Railroad, giving the company its only access to Kentucky. Ownership of the railroad and the bridge passed on to Penn Central and later Conrail, which then sold the line from Louisville to Indianapolis, Indiana to the Louisville and Indiana Railroad, the current bridge owner.

Second Street Bridge as seen from Jeffersonville, IN with Louisville in the background
Second Street Bridge as seen from Jeffersonville, IN with Louisville in the background

Along the Falls is a statue of Lewis and Clark

Lewis and Clark meeting at the Falls of the Ohio
Lewis and Clark meeting at the Falls of the Ohio

Meriwether Lewis met William Clark (younger brother of General George Clark) in 1803. Together they recruited the “Nine Young Men from Kentucky” that formed the core of the Corps of Discovery. Meriwether Lewis and his party left Pittsburgh on August 31st 1803, reaching Louisville on October 14th where he was met by William Clark.  At their handshake upon this meeting the Lewis and Clark Expedition was born.  (see more detailed history here).

Another view of Lewis and Clark meeting
Another view of Lewis and Clark meeting

Over the years I have driven hundreds of miles across the U.S. and have traced the many paths of Lewis and Clark, even to Astoria, Oregon where their final western destination ended at Fort Clatsop. I have been to L & C sites in Nebraska, Montana, Missouri, Idaho and more.  But this is where it all started!!  Here is a map f their entire route.

Lewis and Clark Exhibition Route

After the visit to Clarksville, I headed to Jeffersonville to see what may be there.  To my delight, I discovered a series of floodwall murals, similar to what I have seen in other river communities.

Bench in Jeffersonville, IN
Bench in Jeffersonville, IN

Turns out that the 12 murals depicting the history of Jeffersonville were painted by Robert Dafford and his crew.  This project began in 2007 and was completed in 2012.  Ironically, I had seen his mural works in previous visits to Point Pleasant, WV, Paducah, KY and Portsmouth, OH. (see Paducah work here and the Point Pleasant work here). Dafford apparently has his photorealistic mural art in over 200 locations around the world.

Robert Dafford murals on the floodwall in Jeffersontown
Robert Dafford murals on the floodwall in Jeffersontown
Schimpff's Candy Store - one of 12 floodwall murals by Louisiana artist Robert Dafford
Schimpff’s Candy Store – one of 12 floodwall murals by Louisiana artist Robert Dafford
Band Concert in Town Square - one of 12 floodwall murals painted by Robert Dafford
Band Concert in Town Square – one of 12 floodwall murals painted by Robert Dafford and his team
The Howard House - one of 12 floodwall murals in Jeffersonville
The Howard House – one of 12 floodwall murals in Jeffersonville
A River Scene mural in Jeffersonville by Robert Dafford
A River Scene mural in Jeffersonville by Robert Dafford
A mural depicting Riverboats on the Ohio in Jeffersonville, IN by Robert Dafford
A mural depicting Riverboats on the Ohio in Jeffersonville, IN by Robert Dafford

Just a few blocks away is an entirely different scene.  The Industrial Terrorplex, a massive haunted house and “horror complex” created using state of the art Hollywood effects, offered up some surprises as I rounded the corner.  A couple of huge gargoyles were waiting on the fencepost to pounce down on me.

Gargoyle on fence at Industrial Terrorplex in Jeffersonville, IN
Gargoyle on fence at Industrial Terrorplex in Jeffersonville, IN
Another Industrial Terrorplex gargoyle waits to pounce on someone
Another Industrial Terrorplex gargoyle waits to pounce on someone

The gargoyles were enough to scare me back across the river to pick up my daughter and her friends and make our way back to Lexington.  Along the way I did see a more pleasant statue…Thomas Jefferson said a nice hello as did a few ducks.

Thomas Jefferson statue in Jeffersonville, IN
Thomas Jefferson statue in Jeffersonville, IN
Ducks say hello by the Ohio River
Ducks say hello by the Ohio River
Back to Kentucky over the bridge
Back to Kentucky over the bridge