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A Quirky and Offbeat Weekend in Cincinnati

The Singing Mural - Cincinnati

The Singing Mural – Designed by C.F. Payne

The first week of April 2014 provided a great fun time for my wife and I as we went to Cincinnati for a weekend getaway.  The main reason was to see my good friend Antsy McClain perform with a new “Trailer Park Troubadours” band that included amazing Aussie musician Pauly Zarb and the fabulous finger picking virtuoso Pat Kirtley and his brother.  We decided to make a weekend of it and visit a few places around Cincy that we have not seen yet.

Cincinnati Skyline

Cincinnati Skyline

Our first stop in town was a place that I have wanted to visit for quite a while.  Called the “Mushroom House,” it is truly one of the quirkiest places in the city.  The Mushroom House is located in the Hyde Park District of the city at the corner of Erie Ave. and Tarpis Ave.  It was created by architect/artist Terry Brown (who died in a car accident in Texas in 2008).  As a professor of Architecture and Interior Design at the University of Cincinnati, Brown created the building with the help of university students from 1992 to 2006.

The Mushroom House in Hyde Park area of Cincinnati

The Mushroom House in Hyde Park area of Cincinnati

The house was built using a variety of materials including wood, colored glass, shell, ceramics, and various metals.  Care was taken to craft these materials into irregular shapes like those found in nature.  Following are a few shots of the house I took.

Mushroom House front side

Mushroom House front side

Mushroom House Chimney

Mushroom House Chimney

Mushroom House side wall

Mushroom House side wall

Mushroom House back side

Mushroom House back side

Sumoflam at the Mushroom House in Cincinnati

Sumoflam at the Mushroom House in Cincinnati

One more view of the Mushroom House

One more view of the Mushroom House

From the Mushroom House we made our way to the Over-the-Rhine area of Cincy.  Over-the-Rhine (OTR) has been around since the 1780s and encompasses 362.5 acres of the original German community. The majority of structures are two-, three-, and four-story brick or stone edifices erected in the last half of the 19th century for residential and commercial uses.  All types of architectural styles can be found including Greek Revival, Italianate, and Queen Anne. The area was once one of the largest German-American neighborhoods in the United States.

Historic buildings in the Over-the-Rhine district

Colorful historic buildings in the Over-the-Rhine district

Over-the-Rhine is also home of the Findlay Market.  The Market is touted as Ohio’s oldest continuously operated public market  and is considered one of Cincinnati’s most cherished institutions.

Findlay Market, Cincinnati

Findlay Market, Cincinnati

Findlay Market is home year-around to about two dozen indoor merchants selling meat, fish, poultry, produce, flowers, cheese, deli, and ethnic foods. On Saturdays and Sundays from April to November the Market also hosts a thriving farmer’s market, dozens of outdoor vendors, numerous street performers, and lots of special events.  We got there a little late for the farmer’s market, but had a nice time shopping in the crowded indoor market.

Findlay Market indoor shopping

Findlay Market indoor shopping

We love spices and were thrilled to see a “Gourmet Spice” shop…  Colonel De Gourmet Herbs and Spices has an amazing variety of spices and mixed herbs and spices.  We couldn’t resist the temptations.

Spicing it up at Findlay Market's "Colonel De" Shoppe

Spicing it up at Findlay Market’s “Colonel De” Gourmet Spice Shoppe

Spices Galore!

Spices Galore!

Colonel De's Gourmet Herbs and Spices

Colonel De’s Gourmet Herbs and Spices

We also found some unique Mediterranean pastries, some unique Olive Oils, vinegars and more.  One can find fresh meat, fish, vegetables and lots of other wonderful goodies.

Sumoflam at Findlay's Market in the Over-the-Rhine District of Cincinnati

Sumoflam at Findlay’s Market in the Over-the-Rhine District of Cincinnati

Frank's Fish & Seafood in Findlay Market

Frank’s Fish & Seafood in Findlay Market

All around the neighborhood there are murals and wall art.  Those who follow my blogs know how much I enjoy seeing these great works of art.  There are actually murals all over the city thanks to the ArtWorks organization.  A partial photo listing of many of the great works, including their locations, can be seen here.

Murals on wall near Findlay Market

Murals on wall near Findlay Market represent different shops

Mural representing Findlay Market

Mural representing Findlay Market

Sunflower Wall mural near Findlay Market parking lot

Sunflower Wall mural near Findlay Market parking lot

The most unique mural we saw was a huge one on the side of a building on Race Street called “The Migration of Tradition.” It is a beautiful work made with tiles and paint. It was designed by Tina Westerkamp, another Cincinnati artist.

"The Migration of Tradition" by Tina Westerkamp on Race St. in Cincinnati

“The Migration of Tradition” by Tina Westerkamp on Race St. in Cincinnati

Detail of "The Migration of Tradition"

Detail of “The Migration of Tradition”

All of the shopping and looking piqued our appetites (and it was already 3 PM), so we sought for a local place that offered some vegan faire.  We found a place called Myra’s Dionysus, a small place with an eclectic menu.  They had a variety of Mediterranean Cuisine as well as some other entrees, many of which are vegan.

Sumoflam at Myra's Dionysus in Cincinnati

Sumoflam at Myra’s Dionysus in Cincinnati

Myra's Chalkboard Menu

Myra’s Chalkboard Menu

Inside Myra's - small but clean

Inside Myra’s – small but clean

My meal at Myra's Dionysus - a pesto fettucine, some bread and hummus.

Our appetizer at Myra’s Dionysus – sesame noodles, pita and some tabouli

After our meal we took a drive down the Central Parkway so we could see the mural I had long wanted to visit.  Called “The Singing Mural,” this mural represents the community coming together in celebration of the arts.  It was designed by nationally renowned Cincinnati artist and illustrator C.F. Payne and completed in 2011.  At 25 feet tall and 135 feet long, it is Cincinnati’s largest mural and features some famous faces including Elton John, Bach, Sesame Street’s Grover, Cab Calloway, Beverly Sills, Mr. Rogers and even “Mr. Redlegs.”

Cincinnati's "The Singing Mural" (detail) by C.F. Payne

Cincinnati’s “The Singing Mural” (detail) by C.F. Payne

Another detail of "The Singing Mural"

Another detail of “The Singing Mural”

From the mural it we headed across the river to Hebron, Kentucky to our hotel and then back north to Harrison, Ohio where we would watch the always quirky and fun Antsy McClain and his friends perform.  We visited with them before the show — got to see Antsy’s new grandchild, got to see Pauly (who has been performing in Europe for the past year) and then Pat.

Looking at Antsy's new granddaughter - a real cutie!

Looking at Antsy’s new granddaughter – a real cutie!

Hanging with my Aussie mate Pauly Zarb, who came to the states for a few shows and then back to England

Hanging with my Aussie mate Pauly Zarb, who came to the states for a few shows and then back to England

Kentucky musician Pat Kirtley was on hand to help Antsy.  Pat is an amazing guitarist.  I have known him for about 4 years.

Kentucky musician Pat Kirtley was on hand to help Antsy. Pat is an amazing guitarist. I have known him for about 4 years.

AntsyCincy

Antsy McClain performing live in Cincinnati

After Antsy’s amazing show, Julianne and I returned to the hotel for a good night’s rest (needed!!).  The next morning (late), we headed to Cincinnati’s Northside area for a breakfast brunch at a small eclectic place called Melt. They have an awesome variety of dishes including quite a few vegan and vegetarian dishes.  The food was fabulous!!!

Melt in Cincinnati

Melt in Cincinnati

Great Vegan Brunch at Melt

Great Vegan Brunch at Melt

Melt Cafe

Melt Cafe – Cincinnati

One of Melt's Menu Boards

One of Melt’s Menu Boards

After breakfast we took a drive around the Northside… more murals and a great Graffiti wall reminiscent of what I saw in Toronto a few years ago.

Large Mural on side of building representing the Northside district

Large Mural on side of building representing the Northside district

Artist at work on Graffiti wall in Northside

Artist at work on Graffiti wall in Northside

Colorful Graffiti wall in Northside of Cincinnati

Colorful Graffiti wall in Northside of Cincinnati

More colorful graffiti in Northside

More colorful graffiti in Northside

Graffiti everywhere - very colorful

Graffiti everywhere – very colorful

Sumoflam at Northside graffiti walls

Sumoflam at Northside graffiti walls

A few blocks away was another giant mural on the side of a building.  It too was unique and really stood out….

Tall mural on side of a building in Cincinnati's Northside

Tall mural on side of a building in Cincinnati’s Northside

Sadly, all things mus come to an end.  After a drive around the Northside, it was back on the road south to Lexington.

Rabbit Hash General Store

Travels Along the Length of the Ohio River: Pt 2 – Cincinnati to Cairo

Ohio River

The Ohio River is one of America’s biggest rivers. It is not the longest river by any means, but it is one of the widest rivers and also one of the deepest. It stretches from Pittsburgh down to West Virginia along the Kentucky/Ohio border, the Kentucky/Indiana border, part of Illinois and all the way down until it feeds into the Mississippi River near Cairo, Illinois.  Part 1 of my report covered travel along the river from its beginnings in Pittsburgh, PA all the way to the outskirts of Cincinnati. Part 2 will cover the remainder of the river as it flows along the Kentucky, Indiana and Illinois borders and then to its confluence with the Mississippi River.

Ohio River as it flows through Cincinnati, OH

Ohio River as it flows through Cincinnati, OH

Cincinnati is the third largest city in Ohio and the 25th largest city in the United States by metropolitan population and is located at the confluence of the Licking River and the Ohio River.   It became known as the Queen City after Henry Wadsworth Longfellow referred to it as the “Queen of the West” in his poem “Catawba Wine.”

The Ascent at Roebling's in Cincinnati

The Ascent at Roebling’s Bridge in Covington, KY

As one enters the Cincinnati are from most directions, they will not be able to miss the unusual building called “The Ascent“, which was designed by Daniel Libeskind, one of the world’s most prominent architects. The building stands 293 feet tall, 22 stories (including one 19 floors of luxury condominiums) and ends in a sloped spiral roof.  But it is not the only unique building in the area.  Also on the Kentucky side of the Ohio River is an out of this world house called “The Futuro House” in Covington, located on a hill overlooking Cincinnati on the west side of Interstate 71/75,  This hill also offers some amazing views of the city. The Futuro has inhabited it’s location on the hill since 1976.

The Futuro House in Covington, KY

The Futuro House in Covington, KY

Detail of Futuro House

Detail of Futuro House

Beam Me Up Scotty at the Front Door of Futuro House

Beam Me Up Scotty at the Front Door of Futuro House

From the hill you can get an awesome of view of the skyline of the city as well as a couple of the city’s other unique buildings,

Cincinnati Skyline

Cincinnati Skyline and bridges over the Ohio River

The old Union Terminal in Cincinnati, now the Museum Center

The old Union Terminal in Cincinnati, now the Museum Center

The Union Terminal was built in 1933. One of the last great train stations built, Union Terminal has become one of the iconic symbols of Cincinnati.

The Radisson hotel in Covington...a round building

The Radisson Hotel (formerly the Cincinnati Riverfront) in Covington…a round building – with a revolving restaurant

Below is an interesting video about the round hotel….and the 360 Dining restaurant at the top of it, which is the largest revolving restaurant east of Las Vegas.  It is considered to be one of the top 100 romantic restaurants in the United States.

Obviously, I could write four or five posts about Cincinnati, so I’ll only mention one other spot in town…a must see…the Cincinnati Zoo. I have visited there twice and it’s one of the better zoos in my opinion. Here are a couple of photos.

The Cincinnati/Covington area has a number of bridges that cross over the Ohio. Perhaps the most famous is the John A. Roebling Suspension Bridge which spans 1,057 feet across the river. At the time it was opened in December 1866, it was considered to be the world’s largest suspension bridge.

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John A. Roebling Suspension Bridge

Additionally, there are eight other bridges between Newport or Covington and Cincinnati, including a unique touristy pedestrian bridge from Newport affectionately called the “Purple People Bridge”. Officially called the Newport Southbank Bridge, this 2,670 foot bridge connects the Newport area, which includes an IMAX Theater, the famous Newport Aquarium and more, to Cincinnati.

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Purple People Bridge

From Cincinnati, the best route to take along the river is probably the River Road which is Kentucky Highway 8 and then continue to head west on that.  Hwy 8 will eventually turn south and just follow the river. This road takes one right past the Cincinnati – Northern Kentucky airport and on down the river past I- 275, which crosses over the river near the confluence of the Little Miami River and the  Ohio River.

From that point you are at Kentucky Hwy 20. You can pretty much follow the river,  sometimes from a distance,  but other parts follow right along the river. Eventually, the road runs through the town of Hebron, the home of the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport.

Sign at Rabbit Hash Road

Sign at Rabbit Hash Road

Continue on the same road until the river and then head south  From there Hwy 20 will continue a few miles more until it runs into Kentucky Hwy 18. Then, continue south on Kentucky 18 towards Rabbit Hash, Kentucky.  To get there, Hwy 18 will turn into Hwy 338 which runs for a few miles until E. Bend Rd.  Just before the highway changes, you will see Rabbit Hash Road and you’ll go down that road  into the small village of Rabbit Hash. This is one of the must see locations along the entire length of the Ohio River!! There is a wonderful old store, an antique shop, some historical markers, and many posters of the current mayor of the town, which is a dog. From Rabbit Hash looking across the Ohio River into Indiana, you can see the big casino resort of Rising Sun, Indiana.

Welcome to Rabbit Hash, KY

Welcome to Rabbit Hash, KY

Rabbit Hash General Store

Rabbit Hash General Store

The town itself is unique, has a wonderful name, and some unique stores. And the mayor is a dog! But the views of the river or also spectacular from Rabbit Hash.

Lucy Lou, Mayor of Rabbit Hash

Lucy Lou, Mayor of Rabbit Hash

View of Rising Sun, Indiana

View of Rising Sun, Indiana

Heading south out of Rabbit Hash you’ll get back onto Kentucky Hwy 338 and follow that until it turns into Beaver Road which is still Hwy 338. Following Beaver Road, you will eventually find your way into Big Bone Lick State Park. This is a unique park in that they house a number of bison. But they’ve also found a number of prehistoric dinosaur bones in this park.

Big Bone Lick State Park, Kentucky

Big Bone Lick State Park, Kentucky

One of a number of bison at Big Bone Lick State Park

One of a number of bison at Big Bone Lick State Park

Just for fun you may want to continue down Hwy 338 towards US Hwys 127 and 42. When you hit that junction, you will be in Beaverlick, Kentucky. This was the home of the Beaver Lick Trading Post. The community was established as a fur trading site between 1780 and 1820. A post office was established at Beaver Lick in 1853 with John Tucker its postmaster. Beaverlick was spelled as one word by 1900.

Beaver Lick Trading post

Beaver Lick Trading Post – Now Closed

From Beaverlick, you will turn right on US one 27/42 and continue south west which will take you to a big bend in the Ohio River and at the Hwy 42 and 127 split and you’ll stay right on US Hwy 42.  Following Hwy 42 right along the river will take you into the Kentucky town of Warsaw. The town is home to the Gallatin County Court House which was built in 1837.  An addition was built onto it in 1868 and the Court House was remodeled in 1939.  Today it stands as the oldest Court House in the state of Kentucky in continuous use.

Gallatin County Court House in Warsaw, KY

Shortly after Warsaw, you can cross the Florence – Warsaw bridge that crosses over the Ohio River. You will want to take this because it will crossover and then you can go west inn to Indiana towards the town of Vevay, Indiana (and Switzerland County). This date unique little town is dotted with wonderful giant wall murals and other oddities. Definitely worth a visit.

One of many wall murals in Vevay, Indiana

One of many wall murals in Vevay, Indiana

The drive west on Indiana State 56, also known as the Ohio River scenic Highway, is a beautiful drive. It will eventually get you into Madison, Indiana. There is another old bridge (the Milton-Madison Bridge) there that will cross into Kentucky if you decide to go that direction or you may continue west on the Indiana side.

If you decide to cross the river, you can cross and then head back east just a bit into Carrollton, Kentucky where there’s quite a bit of history. When you cross the river, you are right in Milton, Kentucky and then just get on Kentucky 36 E. towards Carrollton.

Carrollton, KY

Carrollton, KY

Before crossing over the river, you may also want to visit Clifty Falls State Park just west of Madison. This is a very scenic state park with beautiful and tranquil waterfalls.

On the Kentucky side you would continue from Milton down US 421 to Bedford, and then down US 42 which eventually gets back down along the river and heads towards the Louisville area.

Louisville, Kentucky

Louisville, Kentucky

I’ve already written some very nice posts about the Louisville, Jeffersonville, Clarksville area of Kentucky and Indiana. There is a great deal to see in this area on both sides of the river. Following are just a couple of photographs from the area of the you more unique places, but check this post out to see a much more detailed overview of the entire area.

World's largest Louisville Slugger Bat in downtown Louisville

World’s largest Louisville Slugger Bat in downtown Louisville

Meriwether Lewis meets John Clark at the Falls of the Ohio in Clarksville, IN

Meriwether Lewis meets John Clark at the Falls of the Ohio in Clarksville, IN

Jeffersonville, Indiana Visitors Center

Jeffersonville, Indiana Visitors Center

One of the many floodwall murals of Jeffersonville, Indiana

One of the many floodwall murals of Jeffersonville, Indiana

Out of Louisville you can proceed SW on US31W towards West Point or can proceed out of Clarksville through New Albany and then along the river on Indiana 111.

Personally, I have not been along this portion of the river. It meanders north, almost hitting I-64 in Indiana (near Leavenworth, IN). From Leavenworth you can go west on Indiana 62 to Sulphur and then follow Indiana 66 south to Derby, which sits on the river as it bends nearly 90° southward. Following 66 you eventually get in Cannelton, and then north to Tell City (Perry County, IN) and eventually into Troy.

Sunset Park Floodwall Mural in Tell City, IN

From Troy you can continue along the river on 66 or, if you wish a fun detour, head west on Indiana 70 to 245 and go north a few miles to Santa Claus, Indiana. Though not officially a river town, it is close enough for an excellent detour!

Santa Claus, Indiana Post Office

Santa Claus, Indiana Post Office

Giant Santa Claus Statue in Santa Claus, Indiana

Giant Santa Claus Statue in Santa Claus, Indiana

Back on Indiana 66 you can continue along the river to US 231 and cross over the bridge into Kentucky and then follow 231 west into Owensboro, one of the bigger cities along the river. Or, if you wish, you can remain on Indiana 66 into Evansville, another of the big cities on the river.  From there, the river once again meanders it’s way south and west passing towns like Shawneetown, IN,  Henderson, KY, and a number of small towns.

Paducah, Kentucky

Colorful building fronts of Paducah, Kentucky

The next must stop location is in Paducah, KY. While here one can see the amazing flood wall murals,,the National Quilt Museum and more. The town is also at the confluence of the Tennessee River and the Ohio.

Lewis and Clark Statues with Sacajawea and some Indians in Paducah

Lewis and Clark Statues with Sacajawea and some Indians in Paducah

Part of Flood Wall Murals in Paducah

Part of Flood Wall Murals in Paducah

Old Church in Paducah

Old Church in Paducah

From Paducah you can cross the river on US 45 into Brookport, IL. Follow US 45 past Fort Massac State Park and then into Metropolis, IL, another must stop town along the river.

Welcome to Metropolis, IL

Welcome to Metropolis, IL

Metropolis is the home of the giant Superman statue, a superman museum, giant Superman mural and another giant statue at a grocery storekeeper the outskirts of town.

Sumoflam with Superman in Metropolis, IL

Sumoflam with Superman in Metropolis, IL

Superman Mural in Metropolis, IL

Superman Mural in Metropolis, IL

Giant Grocer Statue in Metropolis, IL

Giant Grocer Statue in Metropolis, IL

On the Kentucky side, the last town you see is Wickliffe, which is actually on the Mississippi River just south of the major confluence of the Ohio as it flows into Mississippi. The town of Cairo, IL actually is at this confluence and is the official end point of the journey along the Ohio.

Bridge over Mississippi River at Cairo, IL

Bridge over Mississippi River at Cairo, IL

Great River Road at Cairo...where the Ohio River meets the Mississippi River

Great River Road at Cairo…where the Ohio River meets the Mississippi River

tui-snider-unexpected-texas-books

New Book on Texas Travel: Tui Snider – Unexpected Texas

Tui Snider - author of "Unexpected Texas" (courtesy of Tui Snider)

Tui Snider – author of “Unexpected Texas” (courtesy of Tui Snider)

Throughout my time as a travel blogger I have had the opportunity to correspond and exchange notes with many other travel bloggers who are also find of the offbeat and quirky. One of those with whom I have worked with often is Tui Snider, from Azle, Texas.

Tui is a freelance writer and travel blogger specializing in offbeat sites, overlooked history, cultural traditions, and quirky travel destinations. Her articles and photos have appeared in BMIbaby, easyJet, Wizzit, Click, Ling, PlanetEye Traveler, iStopover, SkyEurope, and North Texas Farm and Ranch magazines, among others. She also wrote the shopping chapter for the “Time Out Naples: Capri, Sorrento, and the Amalfi Coast 2010” travel guidebook. Unexpected Texas is her first book.

Unexpected Texas excerpt (courtesy of Tui Snider)

Unexpected Texas excerpt (courtesy of Tui Snider)

First off, I am honored to have been asked to be a part of her “Blog Tour” and to help interested travelers find another valuable guide for seeing some of the more unusual and fun parts of our great country. (Also, some lucky viewers will won some nice prizes….see below for details!!) I have had a chance to peruse this book and it is really chock full of splendid places on back roads you never heard of. Having traveled 1000s of miles of Texas backroads myself, I know that this will likely be Tui’s first book, but not last, on the wonders of Texas.

Unexpected Texas Cover features the famous Cowboy Hat adorned Eiffel Tower in Paris, Texas (photo courtesy of Tui Snider)

Unexpected Texas Cover features the famous Cowboy Hat adorned Eiffel Tower in Paris, Texas (photo courtesy of Tui Snider)

Some of the places, such as the Paris, Texas Eiffel Tower that adorns her cover are places I have been.

 

Sumoflam at Eiffel Tower in 2007 (photo by Sumoflam Productions)

Sumoflam at Eiffel Tower in 2007 (photo by Sumoflam Productions)

Looking up at Eiffel Tower (photo by Sumoflam Productions)

Looking up at Eiffel Tower (photo by Sumoflam Productions)

For Tui, travel is a mindset. Her motto is “Even home is a travel destination,” and she believes that “The world is only boring if you take everyone else’s word for it.” She has worn a lot of hats in her life – literally – and is especially fond of berets. Her first book, “Unexpected Texas” is a guide to offbeat and overlooked places within easy reach of the Dallas – Fort Worth region of North Texas.

The Nutt House Hotel in Granbury Square, one of the locations covered in Tui Snider's book.

The Nutt House Hotel in Granbury Square, one of the locations covered in Tui Snider’s book.

Tui provides a nice overview of the quirky, offbeat and even scary places around north Texas, sharing often overlooked travel tips for places within a day’s drive of Dallas and Fort Worth. Some of the quirkier chapters include details on how to visit the:

  • Gravesite of an alleged space alien.
  • Courthouse displaying an embalmed lizard in a velvet-lined casket.
  • Statue of Jesus wearing cowboy boots.
  • Museum commemorating the lynching of Santa Claus.
  • Life-sized wax replica of Da Vinci’s Last Supper.
  • Building made entirely of salt.
  • 65 foot tall Eiffel Tower replica.
  • Petrified wood cafe.
  • World’s smallest skyscraper.
  • Only Michelangelo painting in America.
The Old Douglas Hotel in Mineral Wells, 1930s hotel to the stars (and Bonny and Clyde). Covered by Tui Snider in her book (photo by Sumoflam Productions)

The Old Douglas Hotel in Mineral Wells, 1930s hotel to the stars (and Bonny and Clyde). Covered by Tui Snider in her book (photo by Sumoflam Productions)

Personally, I have driven hundreds of miles of roads in Texas and visited over 100 cities and towns, including a few of the places Tui covers in her book, such as Mineral Wells and the famous Douglas Hotel, where it was rumored that Bonnie and Clyde had stayed numerous times. I have also been to the Fort Worth Stockyards, Granbury, Denton, the Fossil Rim Animal Park and more. But I have barely scratched the surface in terms of the number of places Tui details in this great book!

Pecos Bill, the giant longhorn for photo ops at the Fort Worth Stockyards (photo by Sumoflam Productions)

Pecos Bill, the giant longhorn for photo ops at the Fort Worth Stockyards (photo by Sumoflam Productions)

As an author, Tui now has a page of her own on Amazon

You can also find Tui all around the web. Feel free to drop by and say say hi:

Tui Snider’s Offbeat & Overlooked Travel Blog

Tui Snider’s Facebook Author Page

Tui Snider’s awesome Instagram Page

Tui’s Pinterest Page

Sumoflam LOVES visiting Texas!!

Sumoflam LOVES visiting Texas!!

Enjoying the Ride on the Back Roads of America

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